introversion, extraversion, ambiversion, and autism

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rainbowbutterfly
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15 Sep 2009, 3:52 am

When I've done some reading about autism, I read that most autistic people are either moderately or highly introverted. Also, other autistic people have told me the same. On this website I've seen mostly introverted people, with just a few extraverts. Another autistic person told me that the few autistic people that are extraverted are extraverted to a huge extreme.
Out of curiosity, to what extent is this information based on real facts? Do you guys think that these conclusions could have also been drawn from a lack of knowledge on autism?
Are there any of you that are diagnosed with autism that are either ambiverted (in between introversion and extraversion), or only slightly introverted or slightly extraverted?



nara44
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15 Sep 2009, 5:13 am

rainbowbutterfly wrote:
When I've done some reading about autism, I read that most autistic people are either moderately or highly introverted. Also, other autistic people have told me the same. On this website I've seen mostly introverted people, with just a few extroverts. Another autistic person told me that the few autistic people that are extraverted are extraverted to a huge extreme.
Out of curiosity, to what extent is this information based on real facts? Do you guys think that these conclusions could have also been drawn from a lack of knowledge on autism?
Are there any of you that are diagnosed with autism that are either ambiverted (in between introversion and extraversion), or only slightly introverted or slightly extraverted?


Autists are introverted extroverts :D
seriously, this term can be a bit misleading when dealing with autism because many of us don't talk or interact much which gives the impression of us being withdrawn or living in a bubble but on the other hand we attract lot of attention and tend to sense the world to the point of having like no skin at all because we are totally "outside"
i think that lots of the misunderstanding and misinterpretations that's makes are life so difficult stem from applying NT perceptions or preconceptions to ourselves because compare to NT we are outer than out
that's why we tend to get flooded or overwhelmed when forced to live by NT rules
Therapist tries to draw us out of the shell but when u try to pull someone who has no shell to begin with out of his not existing shell he dies
in short
it's the biggest,commonest mistake to apply NT terms to autists



wildgrape
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15 Sep 2009, 7:49 am

It seems to me that your question might be open to some confusion or misinterpretation because of the differing connotations of introversion and extroversion. In familiar usage, the terms are frequently used to describe those who, in social situations, are either shy and withdrawn or talkative and outgoing. In psychology, introversion is "the state of or tendency toward being wholly or predominantly concerned with and interested in one's own mental life" and extroversion is "the act, state, or habit of being predominantly concerned with and obtaining gratification from what is outside the self" (both per Merriam-Webster).

Based on the psychological definitions, I am extremely introverted. The essence of my life takes place within my beautiful mind. I currently live in relative isolation in sublime nature and require almost no social interaction for personal fulfillment. On the other hand, when in society (and I had a very successful career) I am not at all shy, and relatively talkative and assertive. Unlike many here who find it far easier to communicate on this board than in direct conversation, it is less pleasant for me to write this stuff down that it would be to speak it because I think very well while conversing.

Based on my experience, I wonder if those autists deemed extroverts are merely not at all shy, and are in fact introverted according to the psychological definition.



Last edited by wildgrape on 15 Sep 2009, 11:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

ChangelingGirl
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15 Sep 2009, 10:19 am

I conside rmyself moderately introverted. HowThey however tend hoever, I know some Aspies who are extraverts. They however tend to socialize in a stereotyped way, like constantly greeting others overenthusiastically.



buryuntime
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15 Sep 2009, 12:59 pm

What's the difference between moderately and highly introverted? When you say highly it's as if it's actually a bad thing, or a problem. Can it be?



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15 Sep 2009, 3:11 pm

^ Nothing wrong with being introverted. I in fact envy introverts because they seem so good at entertaining themselves...

Being an aspie extrovert is weird, it is like you have a whole bunch of aspie traits that have developed in the brain but for some reason the social instinct is still there. So you end up sitting with a group, but unable to understand the behaviours people are displaying and you can only talk to the group by talking about your interest, or telling a long story. And it feels the same to address a group as to address one person. You can socialise with people but you somehow always stay outside the group dynamic, as an outsider, and people allow you to tag along (if you are lucky). It is very odd.


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fiddlerpianist
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15 Sep 2009, 4:11 pm

I consider myself to be either mildly introverted or ambiverted. I love going off on my own and exploring concepts, technology, music... for hours on end. Then again, I really, really enjoy expressing myself to other people once I figure something out and think it's worth sharing. If something upsets me in my life, I feel like I have to "talk it out" with 2 or more people, and then I feel better. I love having good friends over to my house and sharing my life with them. These are all strong extraverted tendencies. My NT wife thinks that I am probably more extraverted than she is.

I admit that sometimes I go out of my way to act "weird" in public just so I demonstrate how confident I am in being different. While people may wonder what world I'm living in, I think there is a certain amount of intrigue to the way I present myself that people aren't generally put off by that.

All of us (AS, NT, whatever) have introverted and extraverted tendencies. I think many autistic folk are told or assume that they are introverted, then they simply assume there are little to no extraverted tendencies. I suspect, therefore, that there are more extraverted tendencies among autistics than most people realize.

I think there is also a lot of "reactionary introversion," where someone tries to be extraverted and fails miserably at it. If this happens enough and at the wrong times in life, I suspect that this can turn into major social anxiety. When that happens, you don't really have an introvert; you have an extravert with no viable outlet. So they may end up looking like an introvert, not because they choose to be that way naturally, but because they choose to be that way because it is simply easier and safer.


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