Question for Previously Stubborn Parents

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sieneken
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08 Oct 2014, 9:06 pm

Hi!
I'm learning a lot about non-NT topics lately (sorry about the earlier confusion with NT and non-NT!). Also I've been on the fence about getting a proper diagnosis for a young one.

Are there any parents who were previously determined to fight any non-NT diagnosis, but have had a change of heart about the issue?

What was the "thing" that did it for you? I don't want to push the issue too much for family member, but if getting proper diagnosis and proper treatment is vital then I might have to become more active.

Can you help me understand? He's in pre school right now.



Last edited by sieneken on 09 Oct 2014, 5:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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09 Oct 2014, 12:37 am

What do you mean by an NT diagnosis? A non-diagnosis of autism in a child you strongly suspect to be on the spectrum?

If you mean you have an undiagnosed child who you strongly suspect to have autism, I would do everything possible to make that child's caregiver see reason and get a diagnosis; it's the only way that child is ever going to receive the help they need, and the earlier they get it, the better. It is generally accepted among the medical and autistic community that the earlier you get a diagnosis, the better your chances for success in the future (eg independent living, effective social and emotional adjustment, etc.)


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Sethno
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09 Oct 2014, 3:30 am

I also wonder what you mean.

Are you aware that "NT" means "neuro-typical", that is to say (sorry if this offends anyone) "normal"?

Or are you trying to make some point by using "NT" in place of "autism/autistic"?


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guzzle
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09 Oct 2014, 4:25 am

sieneken wrote:
Hi!
I'm learning a lot about NT topics lately. Also I've been on the fence about getting a proper diagnosis for a young one.


OK. I'm on the waiting list for ASD testing but am definitly not NT myself wether I turn out to be ASD or not... I have an 11-yr old DD with HFA diagnosis.

Quote:
Are there any parents who were previously determined to fight any NT diagnosis, but have had a change of heart about the issue?


By the age of 7 the NT world had declared DD hyper, unfocused, lazy and stubborn.
Had I towed their line she would most likely have an ADHD diagnosis if nothing else by now.
But something happened when she was 9 that led me to having her tested for ASD.
And I turned out to be right.
The NT world has had a change of heart in my case. Not all of them have gotten their head around it yet though despite her having been diagnosed 2 years back. Even my own mother finds it hard to deal with.

Quote:
What was the "thing" that did it for you?

There was a kid in the college canteen many years ago. He had a thing with my motorcycle cycle jacket and helmet. He always wanted to touch the jacket and put the helmet on. One day I let him put the helmet on. Bad choiche :roll: His coach got involved and in the end explained he was autistic.
The 'thing' that did it with DD for me was one time she answered a question that caused a flashback to the kid in college. I had her tested and 7 months later she had a HDA diagnosis.

Quote:
Can you help me understand?


I'm one for cultural relativism. No idea on the situation in the US and since we left the UK before DD started school I can't even speak for that. But here in Belgium you would call an idiot a nutter so to speak.
There is a whole stigma about mental health. There is a pathological need to conform unlike I have ever felt in the UK. And if you can't you must be simple. Unless you are very clever. And then it's allright. DD is clever enough, in her own way.
I have had a massive blow up with the school system lately. Turns out they view DD's psycho-social and academic development as going hand in hand. Been telling them for years she wasn't 'school ripe'. Anyway, they came around to my logic and DD can now do another year of primary before she makes the move to secondary education and we can focus on psycho-social development as that really needs some tweaking to prepare her for the social skills she will need in secondary.

Belgium is a means to an end for us. DD rides horse. Has done for 6.5yrs now. It's her special interest. She has just started lessons in ground exercises too, the basics for Natural Horsemanship. I'm hoping it will help her build a new confidence. It's all about the future and finding a way that will give her enough skills to pay her bills when we're not around anymore.

Edited to elaborate...and typos

Quote:
I don't want to push the issue too much for family member, but if getting proper diagnosis and proper treatment is vital then I might have to become more active.


Not sure in how far you can 'make' a parent get a diagnosis. If I am reading this right this is not your own child you are referring to?



sieneken
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09 Oct 2014, 5:31 pm

Thank you for your responses.

I'm fairly certain he has something and the neighbors aren't quiet about it either. When I did know his father for like a day, he had similar facial characteristics, but to me it was all just facial features passed from the dad.

And yes it's hard to put in a statement that someone is non- NT. Now that he is in school, what happens when the label goes on the school record? Is there any way to raise a non-NT person 'under the radar'? Can we find the same treatments? I live in California and I know it pains his mom too, but these are the things that scare conservtive christian latin mothers who aren't even keen on most medical practices. It's sort of against her beliefs, and I just know it's going to hurt someone whatever choice we make. And I shouldn't even be the one pushing this. But nobody else is getting through!