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zeldapsychology
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27 Jan 2011, 1:10 pm

I am not returning to campus until the Fall but am still debating on mentioning my diagnosis of AS to the teacher. I believe looking at that past mistake not understanding social cues and saying stuff I shouldn't etc. made me fall into the trap of messing up and such. Since I'm not sure about that stuff still and am now worried over making more mistakes when returning to campus life do you think I should tell my teachers? I don't have sensory issues as other Aspies as much my main concern is saying something I shouldn't. I'm still debating on whether mentioning it is a good idea or not. What are your thoughts?



Andie09
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27 Jan 2011, 2:09 pm

I never tell professors...or anyone...unless there is a good reason, but then again, I'm a very private person. Has saying things you feel are out of place been a serious issue in the past? If you think that its going to hinder your academic success in the class, then maybe it would be best to talk with your instructors. Keep in mind though that not everyone will be understanding and some might not even know what having ASD means.

My school has a disabilities office that is amazing. They notify the instructors prior the the start of the semester of disabilities and any extra services you may need (extra test time, excused absences for med reasons, etc). Do they have anything like this at your school? That would probably be the most ideal route.



zeldapsychology
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27 Jan 2011, 2:35 pm

Good point. Being enthsiastic in class and not understanding cues at the time (such as you packing your tote bag) I waited until the teacher came out and said "Hey I have to go." before getting up to leave. (Not realizing/understanding that cue) of g2g. I understand my social errors now so that's good. Honestly though having Asperger's for me is like having a drug issue (you have to stay away from clubs/friends to keep from drinking for example.) Me I have feel I'll have to force myself to be normal/understand cues that I don't fully grasp and try not to be so excited for the course material. So I see it as being a huge challenge vs. before (while I did have those issues) I didn't see them and wasn't bothered since I never knew/gave AS any thought at the time.



Jonsi
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27 Jan 2011, 2:56 pm

I'll let them know that I have Asperger's and apologize ahead of time if I miss a cue or two. They'll usually understand and be welcoming of the fact.



Mindslave
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27 Jan 2011, 5:08 pm

I've usually let them know. It seems to work for me. They are more understanding of my eccentricities when I tell them as opposed to when I don't. But this might be because of how I act compared to other people on and off the spectrum. Then again, maybe not. All I know is that it usually does more good than bad.