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Joe90
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19 Feb 2014, 1:12 pm

On every social anxiety/social phobia test I have done or site I have read, the topic of public speaking always pops up somewhere, and I never quite know what to put or what it actually means. Does it mean standing in the middle of a shopping mall with a microphone in front of you, saying a speech about some sort of charity fund-raising festival or something? If it is, I find that rather far-fetched to specifically mention.
Or can a lot of things come under it, for example, talking to friends in public, or anxiety of strangers hearing you talk to friends in public, stuff like that?


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Vince
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19 Feb 2014, 1:24 pm

Joe90 wrote:
On every social anxiety/social phobia test I have done or site I have read, the topic of public speaking always pops up somewhere, and I never quite know what to put or what it actually means. Does it mean standing in the middle of a shopping mall with a microphone in front of you, saying a speech about some sort of charity fund-raising festival or something? If it is, I find that rather far-fetched to specifically mention.
Or can a lot of things come under it, for example, talking to friends in public, or anxiety of strangers hearing you talk to friends in public, stuff like that?

Public speaking is for example making a speech, acting, doing standup, emceeing, getting up and talking in front of class, et.c.. Basically anything where there's an audience listening. It's pretty loosely defined, but overheard one-on-one conversations in public do not count. Fear of public speaking means fear of all or most forms of public speaking. If you're just afraid of for example doing standup but cool with giving a lecture, that doesn't count, as it's too specific.


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thewhitrbbit
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19 Feb 2014, 2:58 pm

Pretty much speaking to a group of people.

I find it quite fun and enjoyable because it involves much less 1 on 1 and study of subtle body language ques.



Joe90
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19 Feb 2014, 3:42 pm

I do have trouble with speaking up in meetings like at work, if that counts. If there's a lot of us in a meeting, I tend to sit there quietly, unless specifically spoken to, then I will give an appropriate response.

Although my social phobia has increased since I left school (I'm not sure if I had social phobia at school or not, though I was very shy), I don't get as embarrassed entering a meeting at work when everybody's already seated and I happen to be the last one in, but that used to be the one thing that made me extremely embarrassed and anxious of when I was at school; being the last to enter a classroom, even though all the kids were just as familiar to me at school as all my work colleagues are to me at work. Also if I had to give a presentation at school in front of the class, with or without other kids, I used to get really shaky and worked up inside, but I wouldn't so much now as an adult. Sometimes I feel a little nervous, but I can ignore those feelings and try to feel confident and excited instead.


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19 Feb 2014, 3:49 pm

Public speaking is an extreme sport for an aspie.

I have been known to do it while talking about my special interest to about 100 people at once in a lecture.


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Who_Am_I
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19 Feb 2014, 6:25 pm

It means things like giving speeches and lectures.

Quote:
Public speaking is an extreme sport for an aspie.


I actually find it considerably easier than conversation. :)


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jedaustin
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19 Feb 2014, 7:26 pm

Joe90 wrote:
On every social anxiety/social phobia test I have done or site I have read, the topic of public speaking always pops up somewhere, and I never quite know what to put or what it actually means. Does it mean standing in the middle of a shopping mall with a microphone in front of you, saying a speech about some sort of charity fund-raising festival or something? If it is, I find that rather far-fetched to specifically mention.
Or can a lot of things come under it, for example, talking to friends in public, or anxiety of strangers hearing you talk to friends in public, stuff like that?

It means you have a captive audience :)
I wish to God someone had forced me to go to Toastmasters when I turned 18. I've been in 10 years now...I've done things I never thought I was capable of. I get more from the impromptu part of Toastmasters though (Table Topics); it really helps.