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Mountain Goat
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01 Dec 2022, 6:10 pm

I really appreciate all your replies. Sorry that this tablet/internet does not like links. I am going to try again with links.
Truth is that when this thing landed, it nearly hit us as there was not more than about 12 to 15 ft from where we were standing and it was quite a thud as it hit on the stony lane.
We didn't see any aircraft nearby at the time. We honestly did not know where the thing had come from. Was only by deduction of all other possibilities as there was no one around and this had obviously fallen from a great height (A height ad angle/speed that was impossible that someone had thrown it by hand), so we could only conclude that it came from a great distance. (The scorch marks where it hit clay like mud (Part of the stony lane here before about a decace later the lane was tarmacked) showed that it was hot when it hit the lane as under the clay/mud parts there is a type of small bubbling effect but the rest is as smooth as glass though a dull black smooth rather like some sort of thing a jewel would be made out of? Jade? Is jade black? No idea!)

Anyway. It is interesting. Though about three quarters the size of a golfball or slightly larger, it weighs about the same as a golfball at a guess. Weighs like it is solid glass.

I hope this makes sense.

If it came from space, I wonder where it came from? If it came from the earth it must have been one massive blast to melt this like glass and to have come down from such a height that it was nearly vertical (About 80 degrees?). It could not be too much shallower of an angle as the hedges in those days were tall with growth on both sides and arching over the lane in some places back then.

Is all an interesting mystery!



naturalplastic
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02 Dec 2022, 6:44 am

It IS interesting.

A science book I had as a kid had photograph of a fat lady with a huge bruise on her side from...a meatloaf sized rock that fell through her roof and hit her while she was in bed. It was meteorite. So yeah. It coulda hit you guys.

Wales doesnt have very many erupting volcanoes. I dont think that it came from any earthbound local explosion (manmade or natural).

Frozen blobs of leaking hydrolic fluid sometimes fall of a commercial airliners, and will look like alien life forms hanging in trees.

But Ive never heard of small hot black objects falling off of airplanes.

So I would bet on it being a natural rock from space.

But yeah, maybe you can show it to an expert at a University or a museum.



Mountain Goat
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02 Dec 2022, 7:45 am

I think finding an expert is an idea. Shame this tablet is so restricting as I would like to photograph it.



Jakki
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02 Dec 2022, 8:15 am

Very. Lucky find Mountaingoat Someone has told me , that it being heavy for its size is a traditional characteristic for Meteors . Uhmmm… Either that or the sky is falling and stay away from areas in which the sky starts to fall :D


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Mountain Goat
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02 Dec 2022, 1:54 pm

Glad that they don't fall too often or we would have to all wear hard hats!



QuantumChemist
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12 Dec 2022, 8:29 am

I found a video that details how to test one in the field. A neodymium magnet can be used for the initial test.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Bhlbntm3-tE

The OP might have a non-metallic/non-stone one, which would be very rare in type. It would likely not be attracted to a magnet. Most of them are either nearly pure metallic or stony (contains iron).



Mountain Goat
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12 Dec 2022, 11:22 am

I want to click on the links but sadly I am using my Mothers tablet because mine started having issues in charging it. This tablet throws me out of Google (Its search engine) when I click on links. I hoped that it would not do that with a youtuble link but it just threw me out.
I have not tried it on a magnet as yet, but from the initial look of it, I would be surprized if it was metalic. Somewhere I have some of those powerful magnets (Fitted a few on some older model locomotives) but even if I cant find that type, I have magnets on pick-up tools for when one drops a spanner somewhere awkward, so I will try one of them.



naturalplastic
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13 Dec 2022, 10:05 am

QuantumChemist wrote:
I found a video that details how to test one in the field. A neodymium magnet can be used for the initial test.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Bhlbntm3-tE

The OP might have a non-metallic/non-stone one, which would be very rare in type. It would likely not be attracted to a magnet. Most of them are either nearly pure metallic or stony (contains iron).


WHAT?
There are meteorites that are neither metal nor stone? What else would a naturally occurring space object be made of?

Comets are mostly ice, but they dont hit the ground before melting (unless theyre so big that they do hit...and cause a mass-extinction).



Jakki
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13 Dec 2022, 10:31 am

Have written with Mountaingoat about this item that fell from the sky , making a absolute sonic boom sound
Before they discovered it . He did say some of it , looked semi translucent ,( I believe . Making me think of
Of quartz ???. 8O ??? Which is beyond my knowledge base . Regarding meteorites .)
But if in fact it is not a piece of poo from the space station or some such.. it sounds very unique.. And if all things
Concerning the rock ,written about is true .. It could be a very much one of a kind…. ( rare) finding .
Generally Aspies report just the facts. So am not inclined to doubt any of Mountaingoats observations . :|


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QuantumChemist
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13 Dec 2022, 7:58 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
QuantumChemist wrote:
I found a video that details how to test one in the field. A neodymium magnet can be used for the initial test.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Bhlbntm3-tE

The OP might have a non-metallic/non-stone one, which would be very rare in type. It would likely not be attracted to a magnet. Most of them are either nearly pure metallic or stony (contains iron).


WHAT?
There are meteorites that are neither metal nor stone? What else would a naturally occurring space object be made of?

Comets are mostly ice, but they dont hit the ground before melting (unless theyre so big that they do hit...and cause a mass-extinction).


Something like impure diamond could form in outer space. Yes, technically a stone, but not what many would consider that a meteorite could be made of. SiO2 can exist in space materials and forms glass when heated high enough. In crystalline form, it is called quartz on Earth. Semi metallic elements combined with non-metals can form some odd materials under extreme conditions. Basically anything from uranium down can be possibly found in space. It just happens that the majority of elements are metals, leading to the over abundance of metal meteorites. Our sun tends to stop at iron for its nuclear addition reactions, so heavier elements come from other sources.



IsabellaLinton
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13 Dec 2022, 8:04 pm

There was a meteor over Canada a couple of weeks ago.