Leaving a Stable Job to Pursue a Better Career?

Page 1 of 1 [ 10 posts ] 

Sabreclaw
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Dec 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,970

27 Aug 2020, 4:31 pm

Now under normal circumstances this would be a no-brainer, but things don't always work the same way for us.

Right now I'm working as a gardener at a retirement village. I mostly work by myself but do chat with the residents here and there. They have pretty low standards for being impressed - as a young person so long as I'm not sleeping on the job and spitting toxic venom everyone thinks I'm great. The pay is low, but liveable. It's a very stable job that I could spend my whole life at.

However, I'm yearning for greener pastures. I want to make something of myself, go back to University to earn a degree and break into white collar work. As someone with high-functioning autism, I have to wonder if this risk is worth it? I'll be six years older than most of the other undergrads so joining clubs and the like to improve social skills may be awkward and creepy.

Basically I risk a comfortable but unsatisfying life. I'll be hard pressed to find a job this comfortable in the future should my attempt to upgrade fail, and I can't help but feel I'm just fooling myself into believing I could succeed professionally. I'm scared I'll be throwing away the best life I could have by chasing an unrealistic goal. Does anyone have thoughts on this? Or this sort of thing in general?



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 78,513
Location: Queens, NYC

28 Aug 2020, 2:17 pm

In this time of COVID, there is only one choice, in my opinion:

Keep the stable job.



Jiheisho
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 21 Jul 2020
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,507

08 Sep 2020, 11:31 pm

Being a little older and having a goal will help you in college. You will find your own crowd. Don't worry about others.

The degree is going to help, but it also depends on the degree. Where do you want to work? Private sector? Government?

Just search for "soil" (assuming you like a field associated with gardening) give a number of hits with the Feds: USAjobs Soil conservation

About a stable job that will last for a long time, well, I have been in places that have folded. Nothing is certain. You might be able to get your degree locally or online so you can continue working.

Personally, I wish I planned my training and education out a bit more. I did go to college at 20, but waited a long time for my Masters. I also wish I thought of training as I moved through my life. There are so many option to learn that it is really great.



Lunella
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Mar 2016
Age: 31
Gender: Female
Posts: 996
Location: Yorkshire, UK

12 Sep 2020, 7:22 pm

Keep the stable job as your bill paying job, outside of that look for other things to do like buying and selling or something else.

A smart way to do it is get a bill paying job you don't have to do anything in like a security guard position and from this you can do other work or manage your own business off a phone or a laptop. You can end up making a hell of a lot of money this way if you can find something.

Don't give up a really cushy job like that unless it's for something seriously good. Don't give that up over something minor like boredom.


_________________
Fish & Chips tho


idntonkw
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

Joined: 29 Apr 2020
Age: 34
Posts: 477
Location: Boston

12 Sep 2020, 10:53 pm

maybe evening of part time classes toward a degree or a certificate?



Sabreclaw
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Dec 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,970

19 Sep 2020, 7:45 am

Lunella wrote:
Keep the stable job as your bill paying job, outside of that look for other things to do like buying and selling or something else.

A smart way to do it is get a bill paying job you don't have to do anything in like a security guard position and from this you can do other work or manage your own business off a phone or a laptop. You can end up making a hell of a lot of money this way if you can find something.

Don't give up a really cushy job like that unless it's for something seriously good. Don't give that up over something minor like boredom.


It isn't "boredom". It's a combination of factors. The job is dead-end with no transferable skills, on top of physically demanding and isolating. Constant sweating and sun exposure is terrible for my skin so it's going to age me really quickly. Plus there's zero intellectual or social/networking development from this job. Apart from a modest income I've gained nothing and lost everything.

My soul is being utterly crushed by this. I'm not the typical blokey tradie like most other working class guys I meet. I'm a nerd. I have an aptitude for mathematics and logic, along with a creative side that yearns for advancement. It's ruined my social prospects as well because I don't fit in with the working class and the middle class turns their noses up to those without degrees and career success.

The only reason I'm asking this question at all is because I'm facing this terrifying reality that while my life has stagnated I've grown into a proper adult and lost all the safety nets and opportunities I had just a few years ago. And yet I'm still young enough that I have a very, very long life of regret ahead of me.



The Grand Inquisitor
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Aug 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,321
Location: Australia

19 Sep 2020, 10:32 pm

I relate to much of what you've said.

I too am working a stable low-paid working-class dead-end job with very minimal social prospects (basically everyone else at my work is a middle-aged man), and I also wish to break into a more white-collar industry. I also am more of a nerd than a hands-on sort of person, and I feel like I'm selling myself short here, but I'm also hesitant to risk a change that might not work out.



Sabreclaw
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Dec 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,970

20 Sep 2020, 1:01 am

The Grand Inquisitor wrote:
I relate to much of what you've said.

I too am working a stable low-paid working-class dead-end job with very minimal social prospects (basically everyone else at my work is a middle-aged man), and I also wish to break into a more white-collar industry. I also am more of a nerd than a hands-on sort of person, and I feel like I'm selling myself short here, but I'm also hesitant to risk a change that might not work out.


White-collar work here requires a degree or connections. Most people make their connections through University. I'd be less concerned about going back if I was younger, but at my age (24) trying to become friends with my classmates who'll mostly be 18/19 is definitely going to be weird. Poor social skills + being old is not a good combination.

It was my lack of social life that lead to the depression in the first place. What breaks my heart is knowing all the social clubs I could have joined the first time I went to Uni to fix that problem, but I just locked myself away at home playing video games, which is how I ended up as an outcast in high school to begin with.

I just can't get over how quickly I got old. I was only meant to take a brief break from university to sort out my mental health. Somehow that stretched out for years.



The Grand Inquisitor
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Aug 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,321
Location: Australia

20 Sep 2020, 9:31 pm

Sabreclaw wrote:
The Grand Inquisitor wrote:
I relate to much of what you've said.

I too am working a stable low-paid working-class dead-end job with very minimal social prospects (basically everyone else at my work is a middle-aged man), and I also wish to break into a more white-collar industry. I also am more of a nerd than a hands-on sort of person, and I feel like I'm selling myself short here, but I'm also hesitant to risk a change that might not work out.


White-collar work here requires a degree or connections. Most people make their connections through University. I'd be less concerned about going back if I was younger, but at my age (24) trying to become friends with my classmates who'll mostly be 18/19 is definitely going to be weird. Poor social skills + being old is not a good combination.

It was my lack of social life that lead to the depression in the first place. What breaks my heart is knowing all the social clubs I could have joined the first time I went to Uni to fix that problem, but I just locked myself away at home playing video games, which is how I ended up as an outcast in high school to begin with.

I just can't get over how quickly I got old. I was only meant to take a brief break from university to sort out my mental health. Somehow that stretched out for years.

Yeah, my lack of a love life caused me to be quite depressed, and that combined with not being very organised or motivated led to me not getting assignments in on time and ultimately being excluded from the university course I was taking. In hindsight, the course I was doing wasn't going to get me a job anyway, but I didn't know what I wanted to do after high school, so I kinda panicked and just picked something I thought might be interesting because I didn't know what else to do.

I don't think being 5 or 6 years older than your classmates would be all that big of a deal honestly. You might have done better socially if you were the same age as peers (or it might not matter) but either way, the main focus while you're there is getting the qualifications you need to get into your desired industry.

I know what you're saying about getting older quickly. In only a few years, societal expectations about where you should be at in life seem to change dramatically.



Christian_Warrior
Butterfly
Butterfly

User avatar

Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 12

20 Sep 2020, 11:03 pm

idntonkw wrote:
maybe evening of part time classes toward a degree or a certificate?

Yeah I agree with that. If it is possible you should look into continuing your job (maybe with reduced hours) while going to university. How many semesters did you take before you dropped out? If it wasn't that many, I would recommend starting at a community college (especially with everything being online at least until next spring) then going to a state school. As far as being 24, I don't see that as a problem. At the community college I went to there were middle aged moms, retired people, young people, people who were going back after several years, every age demographic. At the university I transferred to it was rarer to see older people but there was a 40-year I knew who was there. Also since the time I graduate (2011) it is increasing common for people to come back after several years or start in their mid-life. As far as clubs I can't speak with much expertise on that. I can tell you though from my interactions with young people (I am 32 so I consider being in 20s as young) that being 24 is not a big deal. When you are a kid a 6 year age gap is a big deal but once you reach adulthood it really stops being a big deal.