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structrix
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16 Sep 2021, 9:22 pm

I have been at my job a very long time but the place where I work has recently begun to take seriously the employee yearly reviews. I normally scrape by with communication skills, initiative and teamwork usually bringing me down. As such my anxiety is through the roof for my review on Monday. I always feel in my mind I am okay or doing better but my supervisor never agrees. My nerves are a mess. Any advice? :?:


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I am an Aspie!
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kraftiekortie
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16 Sep 2021, 10:46 pm

I would try to have fun this weekend, to keep your mind off the review.

I sense you will do all right in the review.

I wish you excellent luck.



shortfatbalduglyman
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17 Sep 2021, 8:55 am

This could be a good or bad idea:

Try writing down a list of your accomplishments

And then write down things that the boss might tell you, you did wrong. And write a response to them.

But sometimes it is not possible or reasonable to know how to justify your actions. Especially in real time.

Precious lil "people", inside and outside of work, have had the nerve to wrongfully accuse me of all sorts of things.

And they all got away with it.

They acted like I had to be perfect at all times, to their satisfaction. Otherwise any response from them is completely justified.

They made a mountain out of a molehill.

They wrongfully accuse me of things, and I can't prove otherwise. Nor should I have to.

When they do something they think is good, they grossly exaggerate it's positive value.



But of course my advice might be bad in your situation

Every situation is different



structrix
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17 Sep 2021, 9:06 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I would try to have fun this weekend, to keep your mind off the review.

I sense you will do all right in the review.

I wish you excellent luck.


Thank you for that. I am going to try and distract myself as much as I can. But, my stomach definitely is in flip-flops.



structrix
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17 Sep 2021, 9:14 am

shortfatbalduglyman wrote:
This could be a good or bad idea:

Try writing down a list of your accomplishments

And then write down things that the boss might tell you, you did wrong. And write a response to them.

But sometimes it is not possible or reasonable to know how to justify your actions. Especially in real time.

Precious lil "people", inside and outside of work, have had the nerve to wrongfully accuse me of all sorts of things.

And they all got away with it.

They acted like I had to be perfect at all times, to their satisfaction. Otherwise any response from them is completely justified.

They made a mountain out of a molehill.

They wrongfully accuse me of things, and I can't prove otherwise. Nor should I have to.

When they do something they think is good, they grossly exaggerate it's positive value.



But of course my advice might be bad in your situation

Every situation is different


Our evaluation system is a pretty formal system. We fill out and rate ourselves in several areas and if anything we can highlight areas of accomplishment. If we got letters of appreciation or thanks I can upload those too. Then once I submit my part she goes in and gives her rating and comments for each area such as competence, job knowledge, teamwork, etc. Then we have a meeting. That meeting is what I have on Monday. So basically we go through her comments and I can hear more in detail and challenge any disagreement with her rating. Notoriously the more areas an autistic person would have more difficulty are the areas that she normally downgrades. For example: telling me to SMILE more (I'm a secretary) or being more helpful. All stuff that I have improved on and continue to improve on but it's still always an issue.