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Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:28 am

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?




Yah a case against obtaining a college level education is bad if women seek it because then they become independent and won’t need men thus limiting the options men have of having sex and reduces the population.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:35 am

Nades wrote:
So basically moving things and anything that can be transferred to a database or production line?

I have a doubt as to the level on unemployment this will cause. Someone, somewhere will need to maintain all these machines.

I think during the industrial revolution people were worried about a job massacre occuring. Instead it created more jobs than took apparently.

I feel whatever might replace a job today might follow the same procedure.



Self service has drastically reduced the amount of check out chicks though.
There’s always going to be jobs in cleaning and nursing.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:38 am

[quote="Fnord"]These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?[/quote

]


I’m not sure that many solutions are sustainable or just rushed quick fixes. They need to start encouraging women to do trades as women have the highest unemployment rate. Many women I know that have two degrees don’t even have drivers licences!



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:39 am

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?



Other countries just need to legalise brothels.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:41 am

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?



Some men get erectile dysfunction if a woman obtains a college level education. Bad for family. Bad for society. Bad for religion.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:49 am

:wink:

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?


Eh some trades make more money without college education but probably more physically taxing. Whereas if you just stick it out for a couple of extra years at uni at least you’ll be at a massive advantage for other unrelated jobs you go for. You’ve already done 12 years for free what’s another four or three?



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:51 am

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?


Unless you enjoy living below poverty line and not being able to be healthy then yeah not getting a college education is an awesome life. Guess you’ll be less threatening to other people if you’re unemployed,uneducated.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:53 am

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?



In Australia to work as a secretary you need tafe diplomas. Same with paralegal you need a 4 year uni degree. I’m assuming that to be a waitress will require people to have more than a certificate 4. More will be expected such as to make coffee, ect.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Joined: 15 Oct 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

27 Oct 2021, 6:55 am

Fnord wrote:
These 11 jobs are expected to shrink most by 2028:

 1) Assemblers and fabricators, including team assemblers.
 2) Retail salespersons.
 3) Office clerks, general.
 4) Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical and executive.
 5) Customer service representatives.
 6) Cashiers.
 7) Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers.
 8) Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks.
 9) Postal service mail carriers.
10) Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants.
11) Waiters and waitresses.

Source:
 This MLive News Article 

These are all entry-level positions that usually require only a high-school diploma.  Does anyone want to present a case against obtaining a college-level education?



Don’t need to finish high school to be a cashier or waitress.



Fnord
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27 Oct 2021, 8:57 am

Did you ever stop to think that you could have consolidated your last nine posts into one?



Sabreclaw
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27 Oct 2021, 10:53 pm

Fnord wrote:
badRobot wrote:
STEM itself doesn't make you immune to unemployment. STEM just correlates with ability to constantly learn the whole time you work, as soon as you stop learning, you are left in the dust. This mindset is what should be adopted in high school education and other fields.
Yes, "Never stop learning" is the mantra.

In a technological society, a STEM degree betters the odds of getting a job than a HASS degree, and any degree is far better at increasing the odds of acquiring employment than no degree at all.

If ours was a philosophical society instead, the situation between STEM and HASS degrees might be reversed; but having no degree at all would still minimize one's chances for employment.


Unfortunately a lot of people don't have the aptitude for STEM. It just requires a certain logical and abstract way of thinking that many people don't have. I'm a mature-age student studying CS who comes from years of manual labor and I'm running rings around some of these kids fresh out of school simply because I get it in a way that they don't. I also genuinely enjoy programming, learning new mathematical concepts and finding ways to apply them to solve problems. A lot of the other students just find it boring. They're never going to do well in a STEM career, and quite frankly there's nowhere near enough STEM jobs available anyway. Getting past the entry-level bottleneck is extremely difficult for many.



Itendswithmexx
Velociraptor
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Gender: Female
Posts: 455
Location: Australia

28 Oct 2021, 1:36 am

Fnord wrote:
Did you ever stop to think that you could have consolidated your last nine posts into one?



Yeah but I thought of those after I hit send. Sorry too late.



Itendswithmexx
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28 Oct 2021, 1:39 am

Sabreclaw wrote:
Fnord wrote:
badRobot wrote:
STEM itself doesn't make you immune to unemployment. STEM just correlates with ability to constantly learn the whole time you work, as soon as you stop learning, you are left in the dust. This mindset is what should be adopted in high school education and other fields.
Yes, "Never stop learning" is the mantra.

In a technological society, a STEM degree betters the odds of getting a job than a HASS degree, and any degree is far better at increasing the odds of acquiring employment than no degree at all.

If ours was a philosophical society instead, the situation between STEM and HASS degrees might be reversed; but having no degree at all would still minimize one's chances for employment.


Unfortunately a lot of people don't have the aptitude for STEM. It just requires a certain logical and abstract way of thinking that many people don't have. I'm a mature-age student studying CS who comes from years of manual labor and I'm running rings around some of these kids fresh out of school simply because I get it in a way that they don't. I also genuinely enjoy programming, learning new mathematical concepts and finding ways to apply them to solve problems. A lot of the other students just find it boring. They're never going to do well in a STEM career, and quite frankly there's nowhere near enough STEM jobs available anyway. Getting past the entry-level bottleneck is extremely difficult for many.



Yah even if you go for a survival job that doesn’t relate to your degree the fact that you have a degree demonstrates that you are reliable, hard working, and smart and puts you at a massive advantage compared to other applicants who don’t have one. So you’ll be first priority for most jobs so that’s a yay so I don’t think it’s a hard life when you’re born with a decent brain to use. Does it hurt to think? I have no idea what it’s like to be smart. Is it exhausting like running marathons?



Sabreclaw
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28 Oct 2021, 3:54 am

Itendswithmexx wrote:
Sabreclaw wrote:
Fnord wrote:
badRobot wrote:
STEM itself doesn't make you immune to unemployment. STEM just correlates with ability to constantly learn the whole time you work, as soon as you stop learning, you are left in the dust. This mindset is what should be adopted in high school education and other fields.
Yes, "Never stop learning" is the mantra.

In a technological society, a STEM degree betters the odds of getting a job than a HASS degree, and any degree is far better at increasing the odds of acquiring employment than no degree at all.

If ours was a philosophical society instead, the situation between STEM and HASS degrees might be reversed; but having no degree at all would still minimize one's chances for employment.


Unfortunately a lot of people don't have the aptitude for STEM. It just requires a certain logical and abstract way of thinking that many people don't have. I'm a mature-age student studying CS who comes from years of manual labor and I'm running rings around some of these kids fresh out of school simply because I get it in a way that they don't. I also genuinely enjoy programming, learning new mathematical concepts and finding ways to apply them to solve problems. A lot of the other students just find it boring. They're never going to do well in a STEM career, and quite frankly there's nowhere near enough STEM jobs available anyway. Getting past the entry-level bottleneck is extremely difficult for many.



Yah even if you go for a survival job that doesn’t relate to your degree the fact that you have a degree demonstrates that you are reliable, hard working, and smart and puts you at a massive advantage compared to other applicants who don’t have one. So you’ll be first priority for most jobs so that’s a yay so I don’t think it’s a hard life when you’re born with a decent brain to use. Does it hurt to think? I have no idea what it’s like to be smart. Is it exhausting like running marathons?


I don't have the degree yet. I'm just finishing my first year and have two to go. I don't know about people respecting degrees. In my country, Australia, at least in the areas I've lived, a lot of people find degrees to be a sign that you're impractical and can't handle hard work. Better to leave it off the resume at a lot of places.

I'm not "smart", I just happen to think in a very analytical manner that's well suited to maths and programming. Came with the trade-off that I'm terrible at socializing and relating to other people, and am riddled with depression and anxiety. My interests make me utterly uninteresting to most women as well. If I was smart I would have gotten my s**t together young instead of wasting my prime years doing bugger-all. The point is that a lot of people are incapable of ever pursuing a STEM career, so expecting them to do so is just ridiculous. What we need is to transition away from this idea of "work or starve", because there's going to be less and less work that actually needs to be done.



auntblabby
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28 Oct 2021, 4:12 am

the racket called american higher education has made it a very steep climb, financially, to get on board. one ends up with a lifetime of unreducible debt and, more often than not, no jobs that pay enough to change that. i am so glad i am much closer to the exit door than the entry door. i am glad i don't have kids that will have to negotiate this financial minefield of our american university education racket. a civilized nation would have the national ethos that businesses would step up to the plate and help out here, but they arrogantly just sit back with their arms folded across their chest and a sneer, do absolutely NOTHING and say "you must do all the work for us." AFAIC i wish a pox on all their houses, the university racket and the business racket. :x



Itendswithmexx
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28 Oct 2021, 6:41 am

Sabreclaw wrote:
Itendswithmexx wrote:
Sabreclaw wrote:
Fnord wrote:
badRobot wrote:
STEM itself doesn't make you immune to unemployment. STEM just correlates with ability to constantly learn the whole time you work, as soon as you stop learning, you are left in the dust. This mindset is what should be adopted in high school education and other fields.
Yes, "Never stop learning" is the mantra.

In a technological society, a STEM degree betters the odds of getting a job than a HASS degree, and any degree is far better at increasing the odds of acquiring employment than no degree at all.

If ours was a philosophical society instead, the situation between STEM and HASS degrees might be reversed; but having no degree at all would still minimize one's chances for employment.


Unfortunately a lot of people don't have the aptitude for STEM. It just requires a certain logical and abstract way of thinking that many people don't have. I'm a mature-age student studying CS who comes from years of manual labor and I'm running rings around some of these kids fresh out of school simply because I get it in a way that they don't. I also genuinely enjoy programming, learning new mathematical concepts and finding ways to apply them to solve problems. A lot of the other students just find it boring. They're never going to do well in a STEM career, and quite frankly there's nowhere near enough STEM jobs available anyway. Getting past the entry-level bottleneck is extremely difficult for many.



Yah even if you go for a survival job that doesn’t relate to your degree the fact that you have a degree demonstrates that you are reliable, hard working, and smart and puts you at a massive advantage compared to other applicants who don’t have one. So you’ll be first priority for most jobs so that’s a yay so I don’t think it’s a hard life when you’re born with a decent brain to use. Does it hurt to think? I have no idea what it’s like to be smart. Is it exhausting like running marathons?


I don't have the degree yet. I'm just finishing my first year and have two to go. I don't know about people respecting degrees. In my country, Australia, at least in the areas I've lived, a lot of people find degrees to be a sign that you're impractical and can't handle hard work. Better to leave it off the resume at a lot of places.

I'm not "smart", I just happen to think in a very analytical manner that's well suited to maths and programming. Came with the trade-off that I'm terrible at socializing and relating to other people, and am riddled with depression and anxiety. My interests make me utterly uninteresting to most women as well. If I was smart I would have gotten my s**t together young instead of wasting my prime years doing bugger-all. The point is that a lot of people are incapable of ever pursuing a STEM career, so expecting them to do so is just ridiculous. What we need is to transition away from this idea of "work or starve", because there's going to be less and less work that actually needs to be done.



“ people find degrees to be a sign that you're impractical and can't handle hard work. ”

How does that make sense lol? If you stick it out and do a four year degree that demonstrates that you’re able to keep up with the workload and have the intellect to be competent so I don’t get how that means you’re not a hard worker? What’s hard work to you? Do you mean manual labor? Impractical? Uh think it means your practical because valuing yourself and your education and your future is a sign of self respect and maturity so that’s very practical.