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Aspiegaming
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21 Jan 2022, 10:41 pm

While I've sobered up a bit, I need to get this off my chest. It's one thing to believe in something and have your beliefs challenged by people with different viewpoints and circumstances that try to test your faith in what you believe in, but have you ever tried it with things you don't believe in?

I was born and raised in a conservative family, but they don't know I have a couple liberal viewpoints in secret. I don't believe in trickle down. No matter what happens or what is said, I absolutely REFUSE to believe in trickle down. Ring wingers present me with all sorts of statistics and data or whatever they can find to get me to believe, but I keep telling them it's all a bunch of oligarchic bullcrap. Then they start hitting below the belt questioning and even insulting my intelligence. It's probably happened to you for something you believe in, but what about what you disbelieve in?

I am reminded of this Moral Orel episode where Orel encounters the special ed class at his school. The kids there weren't mentally handicapped, they just preferred science rather than the dominant fundamental protestant Christianity that runs the town of Moralton, Statesota.

That's me in the conservative world. Because I choose the exact opposite of trickle down economics, I get fit in with the mentally handicapped. Jokes on them. The trickle down ain't coming. I'd make a urine joke, but I'm too dark for that right now. The trickle down ain't coming.


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Last edited by Aspiegaming on 21 Jan 2022, 11:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

funeralxempire
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21 Jan 2022, 10:52 pm

You mean the working classes aren't enjoying their golden shower from the oligarchs and plutocrats?


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Sweetleaf
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21 Jan 2022, 10:54 pm

Well, it's good you don't believe in it, because its B.S.


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Sweetleaf
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21 Jan 2022, 10:54 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
You mean the working classes aren't enjoying their golden shower from the oligarchs and plutocrats?


They certainly aren't.


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funeralxempire
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21 Jan 2022, 11:01 pm

Sweetleaf wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
You mean the working classes aren't enjoying their golden shower from the oligarchs and plutocrats?


They certainly aren't.


But the media always tells me how great the economy is. Would they ever mislead us? 8)


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thinkinginpictures
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22 Jan 2022, 10:13 am

The trickle down effect is non-existent.

This is the evidence:

https://academic.oup.com/ser/advance-ar ... 61/6500315

Quote:
The last 50 years has seen a dramatic decline in taxes on the rich across the advanced democracies. There is still fervent debate in both political and academic circles, however, about the economic consequences of this sweeping change in tax policy. This article contributes to this debate by utilizing a newly constructed indicator of taxes on the rich to identify all instances of major tax reductions on the rich in 18 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries between 1965 and 2015. We then estimate the average effects of these major tax reforms on key macroeconomic aggregates. We find tax cuts for the rich lead to higher income inequality in both the short- and medium-term. In contrast, such reforms do not have any significant effect on economic growth or unemployment. Our results therefore provide strong evidence against the influential political–economic idea that tax cuts for the rich ‘trickle down’ to boost the wider economy.