Lilith - First Wife of Adam - Origins of the Demon Queen

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Honey69
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18 Mar 2023, 8:42 pm



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1EKccz ... =ESOTERICA


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techstepgenr8tion
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18 Mar 2023, 10:27 pm

I'm getting the sense overall, especially now courting a Draconian / Qliphotic current now for the better part of five years (moved into that one slowly because I wanted to know WTH I was doing before I fully engaged) and a lot of interesting things are hitting me:

Lilith vs. Eve, nature in the raw vs. nature domesticated, such as the move to the agricultural revolution.

From the above:

- Prima Materia or 'virgin substance'.
- The 'black womb of Lilith' being analogous to the primal chaos of possibility, something that people can experience in meditative states as the void (her and Lucifer could perhaps be seen as sub-ins for what Crowley does with Nuit and Hadit).
- From Prima Materia you might say she best maps to 'The High Priestess' in The Tarot although you do see her as well showing up in Strenghth/Lust.

As far as I can tell gods and goddesses in a way are, like the tarot, 'arcanum' which means symbol sets that frame a set of observed rules for cosmic activity. My guess is that they'd be best classed in this regard as both fractal and transpersonal entities (someone who actually does a good job of talking about transpersonal entities in his five-part 'The Trolls Under The Bridge" on The Stoa is Evan McMullen - who I interestingly enough had the luck of being on a Youtube discussion panel with once several years ago).

They seem to have an interesting vantage point in our information ecology but it's hard to tell sometimes whether their shapes and characters are indeed contrived or 'cooked to order' for cultural needs or whether, to some degree, they're 'revealed' or 'discovered' in the way mathematics is. It's probably a bit of both because you'll notice a lot of gods and goddess fill similar functions across cultures and their similarities seem to set up in accordance with the 'real world' phenomena or paradoxes they were set up to govern or place a navigable / conscious face on.


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18 Mar 2023, 11:05 pm

Where's Twizty when he's needed?


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18 Mar 2023, 11:13 pm

Lilith - the first wife of Frasier.


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18 Mar 2023, 11:41 pm

Quote:
Historically, the figure of Lilith first appeared in a class of wind and storm demons known as Lilitu, in Sumer, circa 3000 BC (c. 7000 HE).  Corresponding versions of the demon were found in ancient Babylonian culture, eventually influencing the demonology of medieval Rabbinic Judaism.  Lilith would become a part of Jewish lore as a night demon and was later adopted into Christianity as a "screech owl" in the King James version of the Bible.

Two primary characteristics are found in ancient and medieval legends about Lilith:

1. she was seen as the incarnation of lust, causing men to be led astray

2. she was viewed as a child-killing witch, who strangled helpless neonates.

These two aspects of the Lilith legend seemed to have evolved separately, in there is hardly a tale where Lilith encompasses both roles.

Lilith's first appearance was as a class of Sumerian storm spirits called Lilitu. The Lilitu were said to prey upon children and women, and were described as associated with lions, storms, desert, and disease.  Early portrayals of lilitu are known as having Zu bird talons for feet and wings.  Later accounts depict lilitu as a name for one figure and several spirits.  Similar demons from the same class are recorded around this time frame.  Lilu, a succubus, Ardat lili ("Lilith's handmaid"), who would come to men in their sleep and beget children from them, and Irdu lili, the succubus counterpart to Ardat lili.  These demons were originally storm and wind demons, however later etymology made them into night demons.

Babylonian texts depict Lilith as the prostitute of the goddess Ishtar.  Similarly, older Sumerian accounts state that Lilitu is called the handmaiden of Inanna or "hand of Inanna".  The texts say that "Inanna has sent the beautiful, unmarried, and seductive prostitute Lilitu out into the fields and streets in order to lead men astray."

Identical to the Babylo-Sumerian Lilitu, the Akkadian Ardat-Lili and the Assyrian La-bar-tu presided over temple prostitution.  Ardat is derived from "ardatu," a title of prostitutes and young unmarried women, meaning "maiden".  Like Lilith, Ardat Lili was a figure of disease and uncleanliness.

Lilith is also identified with ki-sikil-lil-la-ke. a female being in the Sumerian prologue to the Gilgamesh epic.  Ki-sikil-lil-la-ke is sometimes translated as "Lila's maiden", "companion", "his beloved", or "maid", and she is described as the "maiden who screeches constantly."

The earliest reference to a demon similar to Lilith and companion of Lillake/Lilith is on the Sumerian king list, where Gilgamesh's father is named as Lillu.  Little is known of Lillu (or Lilu, Lila) and he was said to disturb women in their sleep and function as an incubus.

↑ - All above from  This New World Encyclopedia Article 


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techstepgenr8tion
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20 Mar 2023, 9:29 pm

A video by the same guy discussing Plotinus's criticisms of Gnosticism that I'm finally watching after having it on my watch list for quite a while:


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20 Mar 2023, 9:41 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
Where's Twizty when he's needed?


I opened this thread for one reason and that was to see if TW1ZTY had posted and if not where the f**k is he :lol:


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21 Mar 2023, 12:22 am

Fnord wrote:
Quote:
Historically, the figure of Lilith first appeared in a class of wind and storm demons known as Lilitu, in Sumer, circa 3000 BC (c. 7000 HE).  Corresponding versions of the demon were found in ancient Babylonian culture, eventually influencing the demonology of medieval Rabbinic Judaism.  Lilith would become a part of Jewish lore as a night demon and was later adopted into Christianity as a "screech owl" in the King James version of the Bible.

Two primary characteristics are found in ancient and medieval legends about Lilith:

1. she was seen as the incarnation of lust, causing men to be led astray

2. she was viewed as a child-killing witch, who strangled helpless neonates.

These two aspects of the Lilith legend seemed to have evolved separately, in there is hardly a tale where Lilith encompasses both roles.

Lilith's first appearance was as a class of Sumerian storm spirits called Lilitu. The Lilitu were said to prey upon children and women, and were described as associated with lions, storms, desert, and disease.  Early portrayals of lilitu are known as having Zu bird talons for feet and wings.  Later accounts depict lilitu as a name for one figure and several spirits.  Similar demons from the same class are recorded around this time frame.  Lilu, a succubus, Ardat lili ("Lilith's handmaid"), who would come to men in their sleep and beget children from them, and Irdu lili, the succubus counterpart to Ardat lili.  These demons were originally storm and wind demons, however later etymology made them into night demons.

Babylonian texts depict Lilith as the prostitute of the goddess Ishtar.  Similarly, older Sumerian accounts state that Lilitu is called the handmaiden of Inanna or "hand of Inanna".  The texts say that "Inanna has sent the beautiful, unmarried, and seductive prostitute Lilitu out into the fields and streets in order to lead men astray."

Identical to the Babylo-Sumerian Lilitu, the Akkadian Ardat-Lili and the Assyrian La-bar-tu presided over temple prostitution.  Ardat is derived from "ardatu," a title of prostitutes and young unmarried women, meaning "maiden".  Like Lilith, Ardat Lili was a figure of disease and uncleanliness.

Lilith is also identified with ki-sikil-lil-la-ke. a female being in the Sumerian prologue to the Gilgamesh epic.  Ki-sikil-lil-la-ke is sometimes translated as "Lila's maiden", "companion", "his beloved", or "maid", and she is described as the "maiden who screeches constantly."

The earliest reference to a demon similar to Lilith and companion of Lillake/Lilith is on the Sumerian king list, where Gilgamesh's father is named as Lillu.  Little is known of Lillu (or Lilu, Lila) and he was said to disturb women in their sleep and function as an incubus.

↑ - All above from
 This New World Encyclopedia Article 

Though we often like to think the Judeo-Christian mythos is uniquely monotheist, it openly borrows elements from religions it considers to be untrue.


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21 Mar 2023, 3:37 am

RetroGamer87 wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Quote:
Historically, the figure of Lilith first appeared in a class of wind and storm demons known as Lilitu, in Sumer, circa 3000 BC (c. 7000 HE).  Corresponding versions of the demon were found in ancient Babylonian culture, eventually influencing the demonology of medieval Rabbinic Judaism.  Lilith would become a part of Jewish lore as a night demon and was later adopted into Christianity as a "screech owl" in the King James version of the Bible.

Two primary characteristics are found in ancient and medieval legends about Lilith:

1. she was seen as the incarnation of lust, causing men to be led astray

2. she was viewed as a child-killing witch, who strangled helpless neonates.

These two aspects of the Lilith legend seemed to have evolved separately, in there is hardly a tale where Lilith encompasses both roles.

Lilith's first appearance was as a class of Sumerian storm spirits called Lilitu. The Lilitu were said to prey upon children and women, and were described as associated with lions, storms, desert, and disease.  Early portrayals of lilitu are known as having Zu bird talons for feet and wings.  Later accounts depict lilitu as a name for one figure and several spirits.  Similar demons from the same class are recorded around this time frame.  Lilu, a succubus, Ardat lili ("Lilith's handmaid"), who would come to men in their sleep and beget children from them, and Irdu lili, the succubus counterpart to Ardat lili.  These demons were originally storm and wind demons, however later etymology made them into night demons.

Babylonian texts depict Lilith as the prostitute of the goddess Ishtar.  Similarly, older Sumerian accounts state that Lilitu is called the handmaiden of Inanna or "hand of Inanna".  The texts say that "Inanna has sent the beautiful, unmarried, and seductive prostitute Lilitu out into the fields and streets in order to lead men astray."

Identical to the Babylo-Sumerian Lilitu, the Akkadian Ardat-Lili and the Assyrian La-bar-tu presided over temple prostitution.  Ardat is derived from "ardatu," a title of prostitutes and young unmarried women, meaning "maiden".  Like Lilith, Ardat Lili was a figure of disease and uncleanliness.

Lilith is also identified with ki-sikil-lil-la-ke. a female being in the Sumerian prologue to the Gilgamesh epic.  Ki-sikil-lil-la-ke is sometimes translated as "Lila's maiden", "companion", "his beloved", or "maid", and she is described as the "maiden who screeches constantly."

The earliest reference to a demon similar to Lilith and companion of Lillake/Lilith is on the Sumerian king list, where Gilgamesh's father is named as Lillu.  Little is known of Lillu (or Lilu, Lila) and he was said to disturb women in their sleep and function as an incubus.
↑ - All above from
 This New World Encyclopedia Article 
Though we often like to think the Judeo-Christian mythos is uniquely monotheist, it openly borrows elements from religions it considers to be untrue.
The thing is not so much that the name 'Lilith' (meaning "Screech Owl") is mentioned only once in the Bible, but that an extra-Biblical superstition has grown around the name and wrongly attached to the Judeo-Christian traditions.


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funeralxempire
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21 Mar 2023, 9:50 am

RetroGamer87 wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Quote:
Historically, the figure of Lilith first appeared in a class of wind and storm demons known as Lilitu, in Sumer, circa 3000 BC (c. 7000 HE).  Corresponding versions of the demon were found in ancient Babylonian culture, eventually influencing the demonology of medieval Rabbinic Judaism.  Lilith would become a part of Jewish lore as a night demon and was later adopted into Christianity as a "screech owl" in the King James version of the Bible.

Two primary characteristics are found in ancient and medieval legends about Lilith:

1. she was seen as the incarnation of lust, causing men to be led astray

2. she was viewed as a child-killing witch, who strangled helpless neonates.

These two aspects of the Lilith legend seemed to have evolved separately, in there is hardly a tale where Lilith encompasses both roles.

Lilith's first appearance was as a class of Sumerian storm spirits called Lilitu. The Lilitu were said to prey upon children and women, and were described as associated with lions, storms, desert, and disease.  Early portrayals of lilitu are known as having Zu bird talons for feet and wings.  Later accounts depict lilitu as a name for one figure and several spirits.  Similar demons from the same class are recorded around this time frame.  Lilu, a succubus, Ardat lili ("Lilith's handmaid"), who would come to men in their sleep and beget children from them, and Irdu lili, the succubus counterpart to Ardat lili.  These demons were originally storm and wind demons, however later etymology made them into night demons.

Babylonian texts depict Lilith as the prostitute of the goddess Ishtar.  Similarly, older Sumerian accounts state that Lilitu is called the handmaiden of Inanna or "hand of Inanna".  The texts say that "Inanna has sent the beautiful, unmarried, and seductive prostitute Lilitu out into the fields and streets in order to lead men astray."

Identical to the Babylo-Sumerian Lilitu, the Akkadian Ardat-Lili and the Assyrian La-bar-tu presided over temple prostitution.  Ardat is derived from "ardatu," a title of prostitutes and young unmarried women, meaning "maiden".  Like Lilith, Ardat Lili was a figure of disease and uncleanliness.

Lilith is also identified with ki-sikil-lil-la-ke. a female being in the Sumerian prologue to the Gilgamesh epic.  Ki-sikil-lil-la-ke is sometimes translated as "Lila's maiden", "companion", "his beloved", or "maid", and she is described as the "maiden who screeches constantly."

The earliest reference to a demon similar to Lilith and companion of Lillake/Lilith is on the Sumerian king list, where Gilgamesh's father is named as Lillu.  Little is known of Lillu (or Lilu, Lila) and he was said to disturb women in their sleep and function as an incubus.

↑ - All above from
 This New World Encyclopedia Article 

Though we often like to think the Judeo-Christian mythos is uniquely monotheist, it openly borrows elements from religions it considers to be untrue.



It makes sense when one remembers that the Israelites were originally polytheists; El and Yahweh were initially distinct entities, Asherah was Yehweh's wife, etc.

Yahwism slowly evolved from a polytheistic faith, becoming first henotheist (elevating one god above others) and then later monolatrous (revering only one god while accepting the existence of others).

Anxieties over Ba'al and apostasy recorded in the older portions of the OT are a reflection of a pre-monotheistic era.

Ironically, Ba'al (aka Belu, Bel, Belis, Belus, etc) was the original death and rebirth god, although it's Anat (possibly the sister or/and wife of Ba'al) who slays Mot (death).


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21 Mar 2023, 10:00 am

^ Excellent points!

I didn’t realize that you were interested in ancient Bible lore.


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21 Mar 2023, 10:17 am

Twilightprincess wrote:
^ Excellent points!

I didn’t realize that you were interested in ancient Bible lore.


Not so much biblical lore as mythology, not that the two can be separated from each other. :P


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21 Mar 2023, 10:34 am

funeralxempire wrote:
Twilightprincess wrote:
^ Excellent points!

I didn’t realize that you were interested in ancient Bible lore.


Not so much biblical lore as mythology, not that the two can be separated from each other. :P

Very true. :lol:


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22 Mar 2023, 12:08 am

Fnord wrote:
RetroGamer87 wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Quote:
Historically, the figure of Lilith first appeared in a class of wind and storm demons known as Lilitu, in Sumer, circa 3000 BC (c. 7000 HE).  Corresponding versions of the demon were found in ancient Babylonian culture, eventually influencing the demonology of medieval Rabbinic Judaism.  Lilith would become a part of Jewish lore as a night demon and was later adopted into Christianity as a "screech owl" in the King James version of the Bible.

Two primary characteristics are found in ancient and medieval legends about Lilith:

1. she was seen as the incarnation of lust, causing men to be led astray

2. she was viewed as a child-killing witch, who strangled helpless neonates.

These two aspects of the Lilith legend seemed to have evolved separately, in there is hardly a tale where Lilith encompasses both roles.

Lilith's first appearance was as a class of Sumerian storm spirits called Lilitu. The Lilitu were said to prey upon children and women, and were described as associated with lions, storms, desert, and disease.  Early portrayals of lilitu are known as having Zu bird talons for feet and wings.  Later accounts depict lilitu as a name for one figure and several spirits.  Similar demons from the same class are recorded around this time frame.  Lilu, a succubus, Ardat lili ("Lilith's handmaid"), who would come to men in their sleep and beget children from them, and Irdu lili, the succubus counterpart to Ardat lili.  These demons were originally storm and wind demons, however later etymology made them into night demons.

Babylonian texts depict Lilith as the prostitute of the goddess Ishtar.  Similarly, older Sumerian accounts state that Lilitu is called the handmaiden of Inanna or "hand of Inanna".  The texts say that "Inanna has sent the beautiful, unmarried, and seductive prostitute Lilitu out into the fields and streets in order to lead men astray."

Identical to the Babylo-Sumerian Lilitu, the Akkadian Ardat-Lili and the Assyrian La-bar-tu presided over temple prostitution.  Ardat is derived from "ardatu," a title of prostitutes and young unmarried women, meaning "maiden".  Like Lilith, Ardat Lili was a figure of disease and uncleanliness.

Lilith is also identified with ki-sikil-lil-la-ke. a female being in the Sumerian prologue to the Gilgamesh epic.  Ki-sikil-lil-la-ke is sometimes translated as "Lila's maiden", "companion", "his beloved", or "maid", and she is described as the "maiden who screeches constantly."

The earliest reference to a demon similar to Lilith and companion of Lillake/Lilith is on the Sumerian king list, where Gilgamesh's father is named as Lillu.  Little is known of Lillu (or Lilu, Lila) and he was said to disturb women in their sleep and function as an incubus.
↑ - All above from
 This New World Encyclopedia Article 
Though we often like to think the Judeo-Christian mythos is uniquely monotheist, it openly borrows elements from religions it considers to be untrue.
The thing is not so much that the name 'Lilith' (meaning "Screech Owl") is mentioned only once in the Bible, but that an extra-Biblical superstition has grown around the name and wrongly attached to the Judeo-Christian traditions.
Yeah, I've encountered a lost of Christian belief that's not actually in the Bible.

Many times I've heard the story of How Noah tried to warn the people that a flood was coming and urged them to board the Ark. The people mocked him until it was too late. This is mentioned nowhere in the Bible. Noah was given specific instructions to allow 8 people onto the Ark, not anyone who asked to come aboard.

Another example that will be particularly relevant to this discussion (one that you have probably heard of before) is how the serpent went from just being a serpent to Lilith disguised as a serpent to Satan who transformed himself into a serpent (mentioned nowhere in Genesis).

They have added so many things to the Christian narrative in recent times that I believe Christianity as it is now is a modern religion larping as an ancient one. The current version of Christianity has existed for less years than Alaska has been a state.


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