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Is this a woman’s rights issue?
Yes: 91%  91%  [ 31 ]
No: 9%  9%  [ 3 ]
Total votes : 34

cyberdad
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16 Jul 2022, 9:44 pm

Twilightprincess wrote:
Why is this the responsibility of Democratic women?


There is collective responsibility (not just democrat women) but for many the question remains "where were they" when all this came down?



beady
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16 Jul 2022, 9:52 pm

Thanks for this thread.

Have any local political leaders led any petitions or events?

I'm working on joining locally but have hurdles to get through first.



kraftiekortie
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17 Jul 2022, 6:03 am

What got Roe Vs Wade overturned were anti-abortion measures passed by the states, then successfully challenged through the state Courts of Appeals.

Then the sponsors of those anti-abortion measures appealed further to the Supreme Court, which ruled in their favor.

It was the judicial process that did this. The Democrats could do nothing, since this wasn’t a legislative process.

If the Senate were 60/40 in favor of the Democrats, a law could be passed to offset the Supreme Court decision. The House has made an attempt, but the Senate won’t pass the attempt.



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17 Jul 2022, 8:34 am

cyberdad wrote:
Twilightprincess wrote:
Why is this the responsibility of Democratic women?


There is collective responsibility (not just democrat women) but for many the question remains "where were they" when all this came down?


The persecuted can only do so much to protect themselves; it's for the community to provide the rest. I am recovering from workplace PTSD due to gender discrimination. My husband is avoidant due to childhood violence and racial discrimination. Many women have learned helplessness (and the like) and many men don't step up as allies. In my mind the electoral process failed also ---- that post-vote step ---whatever it is called-- was supposed to keep out unfit leaders. What a sham. ------It seems we all need a dose of empowerment.



IsabellaLinton
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17 Jul 2022, 12:25 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
The Democrats could do nothing, since this wasn’t a legislative process.

If the Senate were 60/40 in favor of the Democrats, a law could be passed to offset the Supreme Court decision. The House has made an attempt, but the Senate won’t pass the attempt.



I wasn't referring to RvW specifically.
I'm referring to politics in general.
People seem to expect too much of elected officials and partisan politics.
I agree with peaceful protest or getting involved in local government / causes.
Some of the posters here should run for state or federal positions.
Leaving it to others and hoping to be heard, seems futile imo.



kraftiekortie
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17 Jul 2022, 3:49 pm

For most people, grass roots is the way to go.

I doubt that someone like Franklin Roosevelt would be elected today.



Ettina
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18 Jul 2022, 5:42 pm

I felt glad that children have better protection. My rights as a woman should not include a license to kill someone because their existence is temporarily inconvenient to me.



SharonB
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24 Jul 2022, 10:54 am

Ettina wrote:
I felt glad that children have better protection. My rights as a woman should not include a license to kill someone because their existence is temporarily inconvenient to me.

Like anything, rights can be abused (as they too often are). I agree that for "temporary inconvenience" is abuse of a right. The right remains relevant in substantial ways and the current laws (and people's experiences/thinking) are too black and white. Why don't politicians consult studies about the effect of war and poverty on pregnancy and health, infertility and rape, etc? Start there to protect people: child and parents - PEOPLE ---and animals... and the environment... awww, shucks, so much in this world... Remember in L.A. Story when the lead character drives to his neighbor's house? Sigh. I'm not sure if it's my Autism or my personality but I "do things the hard way". I am not one to take advantage of conveniences; the opposite could be said of me. I have high standards, but realize that so many others don't ---- so the line for "reasonable" responsibility is very subjective ----come to think of it, as is life-threatening (and I've had three life-threatening pregnancies ---would a Republican and Democratic disagree while I lay fevered or "mildly" hemorrhaging?).



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27 Jul 2022, 3:19 pm

Ettina wrote:
I felt glad that children have better protection. My rights as a woman should not include a license to kill someone because their existence is temporarily inconvenient to me.


Embryos aren't the same thing as babies or children.

This has nothing to do with protecting children, and if anything, it means worse protection for pre-teen girls who have had their period and could get pregnant. Their bodies usually are not ready to carry a pregnancy to term at such a young age...Yet some states and politicians are fighting to force them to do just that.


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SharonB
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28 Jul 2022, 9:03 am

Sweetleaf wrote:
This has nothing to do with protecting children, and if anything, it means worse protection for pre-teen girls [...] Their bodies usually are not ready to carry a pregnancy to term at such a young age...Yet some states and politicians are fighting to force them to do just that.

I have a friend who almost died at 18 or 19 from preeclampsia; Dr. Google say "In teenage population, preeclampsia has a prevalence twice as high as that in adult population." Pregnancy is not for the faint of heart. In fact, I liken it to war experience for the 10% of us who have significant complications. In order to deal with my trauma related to pregnancy (loss) I used techniques recommended for war veterans with PTSD.



beady
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29 Jul 2022, 6:00 pm

Ettina wrote:
I felt glad that children have better protection. My rights as a woman should not include a license to kill someone because their existence is temporarily inconvenient to me.


I do not believe an undeveloped fetus is a baby yet. I think an accurate boundary is the time when there is a high probability of neonatal viability.

I do not agree that pregnancy is a temporary inconvenience - not for millions of people who have endured painful complications, Caesarean section, tearing, incontinence, death, and the myriad of issues that many women are left with after birthing a baby.

It’s disturbingly ironic that the same people who want to force women to have a child they do not want will also let immigrants die at the hands of brutal governments they are trying to escape, won’t feed, house, decently educate, or give healthcare to the millions of children in our country who are living in poverty, let alone the ones that wallow in the foster care system.
Why would they think they are saving a life when they fully intend to ignore its needs after its born?



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12 Aug 2022, 7:22 am

I’m Autistic and Got a Tubal Ligation. The Overturn of Roe v. Wade Will Hurt Disabled People like Me

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On June 24, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade effectively stripping the constitutional right to abortion access after 50 years. The new precedent saw many of our worst fears finally come to fruition, sparking justifiable outrage and immediate protests across the country.

Now that the legality of abortion and reproductive healthcare lies with individual states, disabled and neurodivergent people are among the most vulnerable.

I am autistic and, at the age of 21, after a year of fighting for it, I successfully underwent tubal ligation surgery. Here’s why I did it—and why the Court’s decision to overturn Roe will ultimately hurt other disabled and neurodivergent women and nonbinary people like me.

A tubal ligation, sometimes known as tubal sterilization, is a surgical procedure in which the fallopian tubes are either cut, tied, blocked or removed all together as a way to permanently prevent the person from getting pregnant. Usually, in bodies assigned female at birth, one of two ovaries releases at least one egg every month. Then, for the next few days after the release, the egg moves through the fallopian tubes, waiting for sperm to fertilize it. Tubal ligation cuts off the path for sperm to get to the ovaries, thus preventing fertilization. However, it does not cause the usual menstrual cycle to stop.

The birth control pills I was (and still currently am) on to prevent pregnancy, are only about 91 percent effective. Their main purpose is regulation of my menstrual cycle and lessening the pain of my period cramps. I started researching other methods of birth control that were more permanent in 2016 and eventually discovered tubal ligation on the Planned Parenthood website. After looking into tubal ligation, as well as other methods of birth control, I decided it was the best option for me.

While I hadn’t previously given sterilization serious consideration, I always knew I never wanted kids. Since I had been on birth control pills since I was 16, was single and was a lesbian, I didn’t think that this kind of procedure was appropriate for me at that time. And prior to 2016, Obama’s presidency and the seeming guarantee of Roe gave me a feeling of security in my reproductive rights—a feeling that suddenly ended on Nov. 8, 2016, with the election of Donald Trump. Over the next several years, seeing his constant attacks on women’s reproductive rights, I started to worry for the future of my own health and decided to take my future into my own hands.

The average age for a woman to get a tubal ligation is 33 years old. At the time, I was only 20. When I told my parents, my mom told me it was “the most mature decision I have ever made.” My dad, on the other hand, was on edge about his 20-year-old daughter getting this kind of procedure done. Ultimately, though, he got on board and still supports my decision to this day.

Unfortunately, doctors with whom I talked about performing the procedure raised other concerns. Since I was only 20 years old and autistic, there was concern that I didn’t know what I was doing and that, in 20 years, I could possibly regret it and sue the hospital—their words, not mine. Many also believed that since I was single, openly gay and not sexually active, there was no real rush or point to get the surgery done at that time.

While I understood their concerns, I knew fully in my heart and soul that this was the best option for me. I even presented to them letters from my therapist and psychiatrist, saying that I know what I am doing and that I should be able to get the surgery. It still took a year to find one who listened to us and was willing to perform the procedure. (The previous doctors who rejected me, despite the multiple letters, were men. The one who listened and ultimately agreed to do it was a woman.)

Though undergoing this procedure was my choice, I can’t ignore the historical precedent of forced sterilization of disabled women. This violent history of control was most recently highlighted with the case of Britney Spears, who was forced to have an IUD while under conservatorship.

Men have an extensive history of inappropriate involvement in women’s reproduction. Early in the 20th century, when the eugenics movement was gaining traction, many states established legislation allowing for the forced sterilization of disabled people. In a broad and discriminatory ruling written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, the Supreme Court affirmed forced sterilization statutes in an 8–1 vote in 1927.

Carrie Buck, the complainant in that case, Buck v. Bell, contested the necessity of her forcible sterilization. She had been brought in as a servant by a family, whose relative had sexually assaulted her, and they had labeled her as “feeble-minded.” The family had her committed to an institution where they intended to sterilize her in order to conceal the subsequent pregnancy. Justice Holmes wrote the majority opinion for the court:

”It is better for the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind.”

In the wake of that decision, over 70,000 people, most of them impoverished people of color, were forcibly sterilized between 1907 and 1945 as a result of the federal government’s pro-eugenic sterilization regulations. To this day, the Buck v. Bell decision has never been overturned, giving the courts and abusive conservators ultimate power over disabled women’s reproductive health.

There are a number of reasons why women undergo tubal ligation, but according to the University of Iowa Health Care, the procedure is mainly performed on women who are “absolutely certain she does not want to have children in the future.”

While I can’t speak to every individual reason and experience, here are six reasons why I personally chose to undergo a tubal ligation:

1. do not ever want to be pregnant.
2. Regardless of my sexual orientation, there was still a chance of becoming pregnant.
4. Lowering my risk of cancer.

A huge factor in my decision to undergo the procedure was reducing the chance of developing ovarian cancer in the future. My mom is a survivor of ovarian cancer and my family has a history of both breast and ovarian cancer; this risk played a large part in my decision to choose my tubal ligation. The procedure is associated with a nearly 30 percent reduction in the risk of invasive ovarian cancer, per one study.
5. Autism
At the time I decided to undergo the procedure and for many years after, one of the main reasons I didn’t want to have biological children was because I am autistic and didn’t want an autistic child. Multiple studies, supported by many autistic advocates like myself, support the belief that autism is genetic.

There aren’t any studies (at least from what I was able to find) on the likelihood of a child being autistic if at least one of the biological parents is also autistic. (I would’ve thought there’d been more information on this, as autistic people are barred from donating eggs and sperm, respectively.)


Today, I am 26 years old. It has been five years since my surgery. To this day, I do not regret getting my fallopian tubes removed.

I can’t tell what the future will be, but I can say this: It’s probably the most cathartic thing I have ever done for myself and I couldn’t be more happy to have done it.

Being pro-choice doesn’t just mean supporting the right to abortion for cisgender, able-bodied, neurotypical women. Pro-choice also includes disabled women and our choice of reproductive healthcare. The overturn of Roe v. Wade has taken that away—and it’s only likely to get worse.


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29 Aug 2022, 12:13 am

I feel for all the women out there. This country is ran by privileged sociopaths. It took me this long to wake up. I already knew in my twenties lot of people are sick and don't care but I didn't realize it was this bad until Trump got elected.


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29 Aug 2022, 12:21 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
I hate to say but I saw this coming when governments wanted to mandate vaccines.

People should always have autonomy of their bodies when it comes to medical choice and intervention.



Yrs, people should choose if they would rather die young if they get Covid. I honestly wouldn't mind dying young, I don't want to be an elder and become vulnerable and weak and ending up house bound because of mobile issues. I like my freedom and being able do do things around the house and yard and being able to drive safely.


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