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orbweaver
Snowy Owl
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27 Jun 2022, 1:34 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
ThisTimelessMoment wrote:
HighLlama wrote:
I
I think it's probably more an NT view that autistic people don't get metaphors because autistic people may take those metaphors literally. But don't autistic people also tend to make what are considered "unusual" metaphors or similes? It seems to me like, because of different thinking and communicating styles, there are probably different styles of metaphor between NT and ND. Autistic people often make connections


I agree with this. I often use metaphor but seldom the stock standard ones that NTs use that are just so over used and boring. I use metaphor a bit like the author Tom Robbins. NTs have trouble understanding these metaphors as well. Or at least they have to think about it, which they don't with the stock standards. I often get a weird look. Or the blankness of incomprehension.


What youre saying is that you "avoid cliches". Which is what any good writer should do.

I try to do that as well. In fact...I avoid cliches like the plague! I wouldnt touch a cliche with a ten foot pole! I wouldnt use a cliche ...if ya PAYED me to! :D

Joking aside though...avoiding cliches is good in text. But in spoken conversation it can be a handicap to avoid them, because, as you say, in conversation folks 'get' the cliche expression quickly, and are thrown if you make up some new novel turn of phrase on the spot.


If anything, I've actually gone back to using very very little slang when I have to interact with strangers/in mixed company/work dealings, because I can't keep track of what slang terms are being deprecated anymore. It's happening too fast and I'm not involved enough with young people's internet spaces to keep track of it all. I've seen people lose their careers and social circles in recent times because of something they said that was taken out of context, or twisted to mean something else. I have to treat using a lot of slang in mixed company as what Temple Grandin calls a Sin of the System. (I also do not openly discuss politics, sex, or religion around anyone but 1) my autism spaces and 2) private spaces.)

It's funny how I'm acting even more autistic here, but it's what we Jews call a Fence Around the Law.


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NotHolyRomanOrAnEmpire
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27 Jun 2022, 2:06 pm

orbweaver wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
It's more annoying when people assume that just because I'm on the spectrum it means I'm not going to understand any metaphors. Like one time when I was at school I was talking to a therapist or something like that, and we were on the topic of shyness and she used the phrase "coming out of your shell", and she asked if I knew what that meant before continuing, expecting me to take it literally. I said that I did know what it meant and that I didn't need it explaining to me. I was 15.


Being talked to like that is why I don't even really tell anyone outside of my social circle that I'm autistic. I don't even want my health providers to know, and I will never transfer the records over.


I avoid telling people for the same reason. The standard list of symptoms you see in explanations of autism doesn’t match how a lot of autistic people actually act. It gets very irritating when people keep making assumptions about you that aren’t true, especially when they underestimate your abilities or understanding. And yes, I’m reluctant to tell health providers as well. I find they’re more condescending to you than most people are when autism is mentioned.



orbweaver
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27 Jun 2022, 5:35 pm

NotHolyRomanOrAnEmpire wrote:
orbweaver wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
It's more annoying when people assume that just because I'm on the spectrum it means I'm not going to understand any metaphors. Like one time when I was at school I was talking to a therapist or something like that, and we were on the topic of shyness and she used the phrase "coming out of your shell", and she asked if I knew what that meant before continuing, expecting me to take it literally. I said that I did know what it meant and that I didn't need it explaining to me. I was 15.


Being talked to like that is why I don't even really tell anyone outside of my social circle that I'm autistic. I don't even want my health providers to know, and I will never transfer the records over.


I avoid telling people for the same reason. The standard list of symptoms you see in explanations of autism doesn’t match how a lot of autistic people actually act. It gets very irritating when people keep making assumptions about you that aren’t true, especially when they underestimate your abilities or understanding. And yes, I’m reluctant to tell health providers as well. I find they’re more condescending to you than most people are when autism is mentioned.


I've gotten clocked as Aspie, but it's always by people who know Aspies or are Aspies themselves.

Telling medical providers won't actually get me anything. I can advocate for myself. I've been able to get by *this* far. I've been able to navigate medical and legal situations without knowing I'm autistic, so they're not going to start now. I'm able to go to doctor's appointments, advocate for myself in medical settings, and advocate for other people, and the latter (as someone who has to do so for aging parents who increasingly aren't, themselves, taken seriously) requires I be taken seriously.

If I had greater support needs, and they impacted my health care experience, then it would be one thing. I find health/dental procedures a bit more traumatic than some others do but I can manage it, and seeing what I've seen of people with even a mental health diagnosis besides autism on their record, and their experience with health care (such as being told a serious condition is just anxiety/"it's in your head") it's not at all worth the risk.


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Erewhon
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05 Jul 2022, 11:53 am

If it concerns a metaphor that relates to my own behavior, i generally understand the metaphor quite quickly. I also think that walking with your head in the clouds is a strongly autism-related metaphor.
In my opinion, everyone lives with their head in the clouds, i even think that the moment you realize/accept that you watch the world with your head in the clouds, that you have a better view than the people who think they have a crystal-clear view of reality. For me, a metaphor is like a pair of glasses through which I see clearly.


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srcode
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05 Jul 2022, 12:11 pm

Metaphors make sense to me.
In metaphor, there is a logic to it.
I can vision the correlation among vocabularies in a well-structured article.

What I am confused about most is when people joke about something.

For example,
if my manager tells me "tell that customers to f**k off and leave",
I will have a hard time if he really wants me to do it or if it is just a way of expressing his frustration.

Many times, when normal people talk, what they say doesn't match what they intend to say.
But, metaphor matches their intention and the logic behind it.



Moloko
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05 Jul 2022, 3:42 pm

I understand metaphor, simile, idioms, etc. but I think much of this is because of my special interest in literature. I realized at a point that I was overteaching my children idioms that they just "got," whereas I had to do a special study to understand the meaning of.



funeralxempire
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05 Jul 2022, 4:01 pm

I didn't really understand metaphor, simile and other figurative language until I started listening to more hip-hop in my late teens/early 20s.


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orbweaver
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05 Jul 2022, 7:09 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
I didn't really understand metaphor, simile and other figurative language until I started listening to more hip-hop in my late teens/early 20s.


Based on the fact that all the autists I know IRL "get" jokes and metaphor and love puns and wordplay, I have to wonder if 1) we are basing our stereotypes about autists off of child autists, and 2) traits that say more that the person is isolated from exposure to popular culture and peers, than that they're specifically autistic


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CarlM
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12 Aug 2022, 9:46 pm

It's all about the idea that autistic adults don't matter. They take kids of certain age and the autistic ones do much worse in some cognitive areas. That's because they have a DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY. It's doesn't mean they can't catch up in these areas later.


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orbweaver
Snowy Owl
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13 Aug 2022, 4:32 pm

CarlM wrote:
It's all about the idea that autistic adults don't matter. They take kids of certain age and the autistic ones do much worse in some cognitive areas. That's because they have a DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY. It's doesn't mean they can't catch up in these areas later.


I relate to this because the main way I experience my autism narrative is as someone who was socially/emotionally "behind." But having caught up a lot in my 30s+, now people just see an adult. It's actually much harder to convince people I'm autistic now. In my teens and 20s, I was obviously odd, but later, I just seemed like an intelligent working adult who had some emotional/relational problems.


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