article on medication, but ignores sensory issues

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AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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25 Apr 2012, 12:58 pm

“Understanding Medications for Autism Spectrum Disorders,” EmaxHealth, Denise Reynolds RD on March 26, 2012.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/1506/understa ... -disorders

It’s all from the outside looking in. It is all seemingly with the goal of making the child appear normal. Yes, that is one goal but certainly not the only goal. And I really think engagement, not conformity, is such a better way to go.

Quote:
‘ . . . Most often, there is a “trial and error” type of approach. . . ’
Now, this part is good. This approach I think is to be embraced. Everyone’s biochem is just a little different.

Quote:
‘ . . . Stimulant medications such as Ritalin (methylphenidate) . . . Side effects include nervousness and restlessness, difficulty falling or staying asleep, . . ’
This is not so good. This seems likely to increase sensory issues.

This is an ABC News segment on Carly and her family
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNZVV4Ciccg&feature=share[/youtube]:25 “ . . . when you can’t sit still because your legs feel like they are on fire, on it feels like a hundred ants are crawling up your arms.”



Speech by Temple Grandin
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgEAhMEgGOQ[/youtube]4:50 Sensory problems are often ignored. And she uses the examples, how can you socialize if you can’t stand being in a restaurant or at a sporting event?
14:20 She wasn’t allowed to stim at the table. She was allowed to stim during rest period after lunch.


I think I'm fortunate in that I have relatively mild to moderate sensory issues compared to a lot of other people. Even so, for me, I think stimming helps to relieve sensory issues, as well as relieve built-up tension. This second part I’m definite about.



FredOak3
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25 Apr 2012, 2:08 pm

I would go freaking bonkers if I couldn't Stim.

My parents tried to stop me when I was younger and I just developed different ones.

It is calming, it sometimes just has to be done or I'll just become so irritated.



Sweetleaf
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25 Apr 2012, 2:10 pm

I think trying to make someone appear normal on the outside, is the worst approach to mental health that has ever existed.


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25 Apr 2012, 3:19 pm

Stimulant meds help reduce some of my ADHD symptoms. They alse reduce my sensitivity to noise (which is a good thing).



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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25 Apr 2012, 7:38 pm

Sweetleaf wrote:
I think trying to make someone appear normal on the outside, is the worst approach to mental health that has ever existed.
I agree.



btbnnyr
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25 Apr 2012, 10:22 pm

AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
Sweetleaf wrote:
I think trying to make someone appear normal on the outside, is the worst approach to mental health that has ever existed.
I agree.


I agreegree.



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26 Apr 2012, 1:58 am

Stimulant medication decreases all my sensory issues. I depend on it in crowded noisy places. It always makes me want to be social. I'm talkative but can focus enough to be able to work on my social skills.


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OddDuckNash99
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26 Apr 2012, 10:58 am

I have severe sensory issues, and I have to take a stimulant for my chronic fatigue/hypersomnia. I take Daytrana, because it's a transdermal patch and releases a low, constant dose at all times. It's the only stimulant that has both worked for my hypersomnia AND not caused panic attacks (which I keep under control with Anafranil). But my bad experiences with stimulants never increased sensory issues. They certainly increased my restlessness, irritation, and anxiety/panic, but the sensory issues never were different.


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lundygirl
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26 Apr 2012, 11:11 am

btbnnyr wrote:
AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
Sweetleaf wrote:
I think trying to make someone appear normal on the outside, is the worst approach to mental health that has ever existed.
I agree.


I agreegree.


Me too.



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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06 May 2012, 6:16 pm

The DSM-IV definition for plain 'ol regular autism does not include sensory issues.

The website for the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
http://www.aacap.org/cs/autism_resource ... _on_autism <-- about two thirds of way

For me, the obvious conclusion, or let's say the obvious initial starting point to start asking questions is that the people on the committee which came up with this definition (which probably has all the normal failings of any committee) did not really talk to many people on the spectrum, now did they?



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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06 May 2012, 6:38 pm

FredOak3 wrote:
I would go freaking bonkers if I couldn't Stim.

My parents tried to stop me when I was younger and I just developed different ones.

It is calming, it sometimes just has to be done or I'll just become so irritated.

And how would parents know that stimming is part of the solution and not part of the problem, unless we tell them?

For example, we have this:

"Practice Guidelines, AAP [American Academy of Pediatrics] Releases Guidelines on identification of Children with autism Spectrum disorders," Carrie Armstrong, Am Fam Physician, 2008 Dec.
http://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1201/p1301.html <-- about third down
“REGRESSION
“Approximately 25 to 30 percent of children with ASDs begin to say words but then stop speaking, often between the ages of 15 and 24 months. Regression of skills in children with ASDs may also include loss of gestural communication and social skills. Regression can be gradual or sudden, and it may occur in the setting of subtle preexisting developmental delays or atypical development.”

And I don't know why approximately 1 out of 4 or 1 out of 3 autistic kids stop talking. And I could see how this would scare the sh.t out of a parent.

But, it is a separate issue from stimming, which I really think and feel is generally positive.

For me, it's kind of tension release and/or zen centering and/or refreshing activity which I can then continue with the rest of my day.

I like to squeeze, twist, shake a soft T-shirt as I imagine sports or movie scenes, and sometimes I kind of make sounds of explosions, sometimes I don't. And yes, this is embarrassing. But for the sake of parents and other people, I think it's worth talking about.

I have a college degree, have worked as a retail manager, am unemployed now. And stimming is a positive to my life, not a negative. I also like to talk to myself, and that too is a positive. In fact, I like having the house to myself where I will have it to myself for a while, and that way I can talk to myself, feeling more confident that I won't be overheard.

So, I might stim, do intellectual work, stim, do intellectual work, etc. And I feel the whole session is more productive than if I was trying to stay statue still like I might at work.

I remember in high school, my slightly younger sister experimented with ripping up paper to release stress as she watched TV. (which is probably how she put it into words before anyone really knew anything about the spectrum)

My mother, my sister, and me, all three of us are probably on the spectrum. My father is the odd person out.



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06 May 2012, 6:50 pm

AardvarkGoodSwimmer,

It does have sensory stuff in the DSM-IV-TR; it's in the expanded text. It's just not a diagnostic criterion. It will be in the DSM-5 though.

In regards to medication to help sensory stuff, any "downer" will help (CNS depressant), but they come with their own problems.



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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06 May 2012, 7:30 pm

Okay, I will be open to sensory issues being talked about in the expanded text. A link would help.

I personally don't struggle with sensory issues much. My mother toe-walks and I think might deal with other sensory issues.

My big issues are loneliness and sometimes struggles with depression. And also economic exclusion, sure would be nice to have job which pays middle-class income. So, if a person is slightly different, then he or she will be slightly excluded? no, it don't quite work that way


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And the fact that sensory issues are not discussed in the main definition of DSM-IV I think we can continue to use as an example that the medical community does not really listen, does not consider us as people on the Asperger's-Autism Spectrum to be full partners. I mean, what if there was this glaring an ommision in a main medical reference book, say in discussing diabetes?

Yes, there is not enough respectful conversation and respectful communication between those of us on the spectrum and medical professionals, primarily from their side.



Evinceo
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06 May 2012, 10:57 pm

Stimulants make me less social, more able to complete work. I haven't noticed an effect on sensory issues, if any. The best treatment for noise sensitivity is hearing protection, I can't really speak to other sensory issues.