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KanyeWestFan
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24 Dec 2016, 1:59 am

how are you at your job? you good? you bad? how does your autism/asperger effect you?

I am a cart pusher at walmart which I like and I am decent at it but I hate the extra like having a walkie talkie for communication which isn't easy for me, its very difficult because even when I am giving 100% try to pay attention, I still don't and the social anxiety with having to talk on it.



PurpleOctober
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24 Dec 2016, 2:41 am

I worked in customer service from the ages of 18 to 26. I now work as a direct care professional at a residential treatment facility for children and adolescents. I love my job, and the fact that I don't have to fake smile at annoying, demanding people and get treated like a worthless peon is wonderful.

I get overloaded at work frequently. My medication (Seroquel XR) was recently increased, which has cut down on my reactions. When I hit sensory overload, I get extremely agitated and annoyed, and I tend to get snippy and harsh; sometimes on clients, but most often towards other staff. It's easy for sensory overload to occur in my job, because I work with kids who like to scream, cry, swear, or just talk your ear off while all those other things are happening. I think that I am decent at my job. Not amazing, but definitely not terrible. There are days that are super hard and days that are easier, in regard to my Asperger's. I try to take a break every shift, and if I start having problems related to my AS, I use mindfulness as much as possible to try and help. Other than the sensory overload, my social and communication difficulties pop up a lot. I don't interact naturally with people my age, and it shows. I come off as awkward, bossy, sometimes arrogant, naive, and weird. I am looking into resources to help deal with that aspect of myself, at least in the workplace.

Oh, and I carry a walkie too, and I HATE IT. It has to be clipped to my shoulder and it accesses the entire campus, so I have staff from six units across campus yakking in my ear all day. And I hate talking on it, it makes me socially anxious. Not to mention the fact that I have to repeat myself constantly and I really, really hate repeating myself.


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Autism Spectrum Disorder (Asperger's) and Bipolar II Disorder.

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JakeASD
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24 Dec 2016, 2:59 am

Over the past four weeks, I have been working as an apprentice business administrator for the NHS. Everyone in my team is extremely friendly and understanding, but I have already had two meltdowns.

Although my apprenticeship only lasts for a year, I am of the view that I will struggle to complete it. Communication is simply too difficult for me, especially when I am overstimulated and anxious. In the coming weeks, my employers will be expecting me to collect calls from patients. I have no idea how I will manage to do this.


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Joe90
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24 Dec 2016, 3:15 am

I work as a cleaner in a care home. Sometimes I find it stressful, and also tiresome.

I fit in well there, so that is the best thing about being there. Otherwise, it's not really the job I'd choose to do. Cleaning around old people with Dementia is harder than you think, believe me.

Sometimes I feel avoidant cleaning a room with a resident sitting in, particularly if they have visitors too. I feel quite shy and awkward, and I can't really clean the room as effectively.
Also I am easily distracted, and sometimes I want to do multiple rooms at the same time, which obviously is impossible. (That is ADHD).


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Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


Kiprobalhato
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24 Dec 2016, 4:52 am

i'm unemployed right now, but i was working from july up until two weeks ago so i suppose i can still comment...

my job title was "dishwasher", but really it should've been "dishwasher and dishfetcher, plus kitchen janitor and fetcher pr whatever item we need in the downstairs walk in fridge that we were too negligent to bring up"

i imagine that's what all of us who had that job did, though.

needless to say, i got very frustrated at the times where it was a busy night and our entire small supply of saucepans and was soiled, alongside other back-of-house materials and cooks are bugging me to cycle them all through again (by hand), while i have tubs stacked ceiling-high with dirty dishes from the front-of-house waiting for the stuff in the dishwashers to finish cleaning so i can cycle those through, and a server comes up to me to explain how i need to grab the other european country-sized bus tubs from the front of the house. our establishment was laid out weirdly.

this goes double, if i was on my own that night, a situation i often found myself in the beginning of my tenure there, when we had just opened and were still hiring, and near the end of my tenure when we were cutting hours.

despite all that...i never had a meltdown, never had a shutdown or anything similar, never broke anything in anger, hardly ever complained and managed to get along with pretty much everyone. i did raise my voice when put under pressure to those that probably didn't deserve it, but i never became any more confrontational probably because of my AS.

i was told i was very good at my job, and it was often my responsibility to train newcomers to the dish pit. dishwashers were notoriously short lived/transient at my workplace and i was one of only two employees from july who managed to stick around until the christmas parry in december, a few days before i left. they told me i was "easy to deal with" and a "cakewalk", compared to other dishwashers, and employees in general. in contrast to one of the other dishwashers who often had shifts with me, who ragequit one day, got in a fight with the sous chef and smashed a light fixture outside

i looked at the cooks, who were at least, just as busy as i was during rush hour, and doing much more complex work involving much multitasking as well, and then looked at the (temporary) consultant/head chef who often treated them like disobeying kids when stuff started to get sent back and i became immensely relieved when i realized i was not in their shoes. i mean, my job was a lot of work, but it was a lot of simple work. i think i would have definitely crumbled much faster if i had been a line cook, and i assume many other aspies could relate. i definitely have much more respect for cooks after this experience.

cleaning up at the end of the day when everyone's gone, while meaning literal mountains of tasks to do if i'm on my own, was strangely calming, because i know that there is nothing left in the front of the house to take care of as nothing is going out. and if all the dirty stuff is in the room, i have a very clear picture of what i have to do before quitting time at the end of the night (or worst case scenario, early morning), which is much better, to me, than the uncertainty and constant stream of the rush hour. i'd like it even better, too, if i didn't worry so much about losing precious time when hooking up my phone to stream my favorite tunes.

left on good terms, was probably the unofficial "shift coverer" for those in my position until i finally grew the balls to tell them to piss off when they called me with NO notice on my days off and asked me to work when i'd already made plans, which happened often. i guess they were just seeing how far they could take me for a walk.

the food is good, too.


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וזה הכל אהובי, זה הכל.


ArielsSong
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24 Dec 2016, 5:05 am

In every job I've had, I've been excellent at the job. Without sounding arrogant about it, hopefully. Aside, that is, from a cleaning job I did for a short while.

However, I'm a lot worse with the workplace politics.

In customer service roles, I was always commended for my excellent customer service. In most jobs I was the only one that genuinely cared about the customers, and they could always tell. But, in those kind of environments there never seemed to be much space for the 'quiet outcast' like I was. Workplaces where members of staff had lots of chance to talk were very, very cliquey.

More recently my jobs have been office based. In those I've always been exceptionally fast and efficient, and great at what I've done. But in one job that did cause difficulty because another member of staff was jealous and did all that she could to 'catch me out' and make me look bad. In addition, I tend to power through and then need breaks quite frequently. Just a minute or so, nothing much. I could work at least two times as quickly as others on my team, but needed occasional breaks for a minute just to sort of 'reset' myself and continue. I was told after I left the job that management hated this and I was only not disciplined for it because I worked so well and so quickly. I understand, they don't want to see someone pulling their phone from their pocket every half hour or going onto Facebook in work time, but at the time I hadn't been aware that it was an issue and I also didn't know that I was autistic and that this could have been an accommodation in the workplace

Where I have always struggled in every job I have, has been with changing tasks. I have never coped well with someone moving me from one task to another - I'm best left in peace to get on with things. And I don't cope well with micromanagement - I find my own ways of doing things, and they work for me, and if the end result is the same then I hate being told how to get there.

I couldn't cope with my office job for those reasons. It caused me a lot of stress. I had a long-term plan to go self-employed anyway, but brought it forward because I struggled so much in the workplace. Since being self-employed, I've had more freedom to do things 'my way' (and even more so, since being diagnosed).

If I ever went back to work, it would be in a light, 'mindless' supermarket or fast food job, or similar. Though not cleaning, because I am utterly useless at that.



izzeme
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24 Dec 2016, 5:28 am

I am a software tester, although i also sometimes test other things.
I am quite good at it, and i think that my asperger/autism actually helps me: the increased attention to detail and the ability to do pretty much the same thing for hours on end are heavily desired in my field.



Dave_T
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24 Dec 2016, 5:41 am

I do book heritage digitization, reprinting of old books and documents, every job is different and its link to what I love, computing and photoshop, everyone mainly leaves me alone as I have headphones in and zoned out working on solo projects.

My other jobs where I was apart of teams where all nightmares.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 144 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 66 of 200


Kiprobalhato
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24 Dec 2016, 6:05 am

izzeme wrote:
I am a software tester, although i also sometimes test other things.


what other things do you test?


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MjrMajorMajor
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24 Dec 2016, 6:26 am

I work in manufacturing, and have been praised often for my attention to detail. My coworkers think I'm half deaf because I can't filter out background noise well (even with earplugs). It's a smaller company with its own internal politics, but I just keep to myself and do my job. :shrug:



IstominFan
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24 Dec 2016, 7:26 am

I work at my local public library, and I love it. I am currently working in reference, shelving books, shelf reading and doing various duties I'm asked to do. I like the reference department because it fits my skills. I hope that these new activities can someday lead to a full time job.



Hippygoth
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24 Dec 2016, 8:03 am

At the moment I have a part-time admin job. It's the first one I've ever been able to hold down for more than six months. I mostly work alone but I really like the people there when I do see them. They don't seem to mind my 'quirks' and are very accommodating.

Sometimes I have some difficulties, though, like when they wanted me to change the way I processed invoices. I didn't understand what they wanted me to do or why and it got quite unpleasant. All sorted now though.

I love this job - it's not just admin; I get to use two of my particular interests, so I fit the job just as well as it fits me. :) I might make mistakes but I feel valued there - I've never had that before in a job.



CockneyRebel
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24 Dec 2016, 8:39 am

I have a part time job that I love. I'm a greeter at the TD Bank and I also do other things like filing and putting papers in order. I also make crafty decorations to put up around the bank for different holidays. I'm very good at my job.


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24 Dec 2016, 9:46 am

I'm good at my job. Autism typically helps as details are very important at my job.

I had someone supervise me recently and she gave me a lot of appreciation for being calm all of the time and responding to children's misbehavior with the same facial expressions I do for other interactions. She said that skill can't be taught.

I'll be leaving it soon to be a stay at home mom (of kids in school), but not because of autism.


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So you know who just said that:
I am female, I am married
I have two children (one AS and one NT)
I have been diagnosed with Aspergers and MERLD
I have significant chronic medical conditions as well


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24 Dec 2016, 9:47 am

I was *really* awful when trying to wait tables. I was truly terrible at that. I never made it more than a week.

But, for jobs I loved...I made them work. I convert most of my talking to adults at my job to text/email/written format.


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So you know who just said that:
I am female, I am married
I have two children (one AS and one NT)
I have been diagnosed with Aspergers and MERLD
I have significant chronic medical conditions as well


IstominFan
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24 Dec 2016, 10:36 am

I was fortunate that all of my jobs have involved use of the written word in some form:

In 1994, when I was 29-30 years old, I worked as an English and reading instructor at the junior college level. The preparation was easy for me, but listening to students' excuses as to why they didn't have their work done was a pain. Also, I was a bit nervous speaking in front of a class, but Toastmasters helped me with that a lot.

Between 1996-1999, I did freelance writing and editing and also wrote some books of my own. None of them were published, but I kept busy.

Between 1991-2001, I was a proofreader for my local newspaper. I loved the work, but not the political philosophy of the office. My co-workers were of a very nihilistic mindset, which was very depressing.

From 2002 to the present, I have been working at the library. Definitely the best environment and the nicest people I have ever worked with. Politically, I would say they are evenly split in terms of party affiliation, but all are very kind and positive.

I am hoping to get a full time job, either at the library or in some other discipline that fascinates me, such as working in some capacity in a medical or legal office. I have long been fascinated by medical topics and I would be very interested in working in that discipline someday.