Page 1 of 2 [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

firemonkey
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,906
Location: Calne,England

10 Oct 2021, 5:43 am

There's the temporary high of getting a good score on a high range IQ test and letting people know(boasting,bragging, ego boosting) and then the rapid dive into 'imposter syndrome'. The negative self judgement. That sooner or later I'll be outed as a ' fraud'.


_________________
Support mental health research
Please support mental health research
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/


Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


1986
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 28 Mar 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 393

10 Oct 2021, 7:22 am

Why don't you allow yourself to "feel good" about getting that score? Indefinitely so.

Sounds to me like you've internalised some negativity about yourself, probably stuff other people told or implied in the past, and now repeat it to yourself even in the absence of the source.

I'm in a creative field and often do stuff just for fun. 99% of the time that work could be criticised as "subpar" in one way or another, but I allow myself to feel happy and proud of the things I do, because why not? The world's going to do its best to try to bring you down, no need to do it yourself.

It might also be good to not fall into the trap of "boasting", etc. If you like taking IQ tests, why don't you take one, note the score, and then never tell anyone about it? Just do it for yourself and your own pleasure.



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 78,477
Location: Queens, NYC

10 Oct 2021, 7:25 am

Yeah….temporary highs (even nondrug ones) can lead to a permanent (nondrug) high.

Allow yourself to feel good about a high score. Make yourself some pasta and sauce to celebrate.



firemonkey
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,906
Location: Calne,England

10 Oct 2021, 8:08 am

1986 wrote:
It might also be good to not fall into the trap of "boasting", etc. If you like taking IQ tests, why don't you take one, note the score, and then never tell anyone about it? Just do it for yourself and your own pleasure.


I belong to several high IQ FB groups. I'm a lot less self assured than other members; who on average are around 30 years younger and much better educated. It's not unusual to post the scores you get.

The boasting is 'false bravado' . A desperate counterpoint to the myriad of things I'm utterly useless at.

Also I'm feeling a bit down due to a tumble I had on Thursday when I banged my head on a bedroom wall. For some reason I've had quite a lot of pain in my left leg since then. (S) daughter says its very probably muscular pain . I've been dosing up on p/ks - 4 hour gaps between doses


_________________
Support mental health research
Please support mental health research
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/


Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


firemonkey
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,906
Location: Calne,England

10 Oct 2021, 8:18 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Yeah….temporary highs (even nondrug ones) can lead to a permanent (nondrug) high.

Allow yourself to feel good about a high score. Make yourself some pasta and sauce to celebrate.


Just had some sushi my (s)daughter got me yesterday when she did the weekly grocery shop for me.I like fish & seafood. Rice is OK. Is sushi one of the most overrated snacks/meals you can have though? Admittedly Sushi from a UK supermarket may compare badly to what you can get in the States.


_________________
Support mental health research
Please support mental health research
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/


Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


theprisoner
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Jan 2021
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 877
Location: Britain

10 Oct 2021, 8:27 am

I always new i was smart, but its always good to have a outside authority provide supporting evidence. There's many aspects of intelligence, it's not a monolith, there's, mathematical, logical, visual-spacial, kinetic, linguistic, (social?). To get any kind of decent result you have to be somewhat good in a few of these, even though you may fail miserable in other areas.


_________________
AQ: 27 Diagnosis:High functioning (just on the cusp of normal.) IQ:131 (somewhat inflated result but ego-flattering) DNA:XY Location: UK. Eyes: Blue. Hair: Brown. Height:6'1 Celebrity I most resemble: Tom hardy. Favorite Band: The Doors. Personality: uhhm ....(what can i say...we asd people are strange)


Double Retired
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Jul 2020
Age: 67
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,970
Location: U.S.A.

10 Oct 2021, 10:17 am

Well, if high enough and in a form they find accepatable, I hope you consider joining Mensa. You should fit right in. And...despite what so many people think...it's not an organization to talk about how high your IQ is (that would be boring since all members have one).


_________________
When diagnosed I bought champagne!
I finally knew why people were strange.


SharonB
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,026

10 Oct 2021, 12:59 pm

firemonkey, my reactions are similar to yours. I'm seemingly never satisfied, except those temporary highs before I drop the other shoe on myself. I had a lot of shoes dropped on me as a child, so if I don't drop it on myself, my experience is that somebody else will and it hurts. I would like to stop being afraid of dropping shoes and enjoy. Thankfully I parent my children differently - so they can enjoy these things. I don't drop shoes on them (much). Wishing you can go back and enjoy the moment some more. Appreciate the goodness in that for you.

I once had a picture of myself in a (very good) swan dive that I put up by my computer to give myself a boost.



firemonkey
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,906
Location: Calne,England

10 Oct 2021, 3:04 pm

Double Retired wrote:
Well, if high enough and in a form they find accepatable, I hope you consider joining Mensa. You should fit right in. And...despite what so many people think...it's not an organization to talk about how high your IQ is (that would be boring since all members have one).


Unfortunately they wouldn't be acceptable, as they come from non proctored high range IQ tests. The conservative, knee-jerk, reaction to such tests is that they lack validity. However several professors etc have their scores listed on the World genius directory, either from proctored or high range tests. Scores are ranked by highest score obtained, which is quite ridiculous when my score is higher than these people. All of whom are much more intelligent than me.

Dr Eick Sternhagen Fields of education: Economy, Latin, ev. theology, Doctorate in Latin of late Middle Ages, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster – WWU, University of Münster, Germany.

Dr Manahel Thabet The youngest – and only – Arab with a PhD in Financial Engineering, she writes research papers on quantum mathematics. Her work to revolutionize our understanding of math and physics is poised to earn her a second PhD, at the age of 32.

Dr Donato Stolfa Nutritionist Biologist Specialized in Human Nutrition

Dr Jeremy Saget Weightless Flight Surgeon
ZeroG Instructor
United Nations rotary wing Aeromedical Evacuations Flight Surgeon

Dr Bishoy Goubran Bishoy Goubran, MD. Is a clinical researcher in the field of Behavioral and Cardiovascular medicine. Bishoy’s research line is in psychosomatic medicine

Dr Daniel Piersee Doctor of Pharmacy in Pharmacy @ University of Iowa

Dr Jawdat Wehbe Cardiologist - electrophysiologist · Heart and vessels




It's just that my peak score is higher than their peak scores, but taken overall I'm nowhere near their level. NB Potential vs consistency


_________________
Support mental health research
Please support mental health research
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/


Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


firemonkey
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,906
Location: Calne,England

10 Oct 2021, 3:12 pm

SharonB wrote:
firemonkey, my reactions are similar to yours. I'm seemingly never satisfied, except those temporary highs before I drop the other shoe on myself. I had a lot of shoes dropped on me as a child, so if I don't drop it on myself, my experience is that somebody else will and it hurts. I would like to stop being afraid of dropping shoes and enjoy. Thankfully I parent my children differently - so they can enjoy these things. I don't drop shoes on them (much). Wishing you can go back and enjoy the moment some more. Appreciate the goodness in that for you.

I once had a picture of myself in a (very good) swan dive that I put up by my computer to give myself a boost.


Some people are very resilient and get over being bullied as a child and/or teenager with relative ease. Others aren't so resilient. I fall into the latter group. My self belief and self confidence is gossamer thin.


_________________
Support mental health research
Please support mental health research
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/


Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 8,731
Location: ᜆᜄᜎᜓᜄ᜔

11 Oct 2021, 2:06 am

Ah, yes.
I have a lot of highs as a child.
I have a lot of it, too, as a teenager.

Mini wins and one upping.
Winning parlor games, winning arguments, outscoring in tests, outscoring in records, being in favored of, being agreed on...

In truth, this 'temporary high's are at it's core, an automatic 'comparison of who had it better/worse?' that the ego mind plays.

Resilience is just one.
Being resilient meant being able to take a hit.
Having priorities meant knowing how to dodge it.

I'm not a resilient person. However, I know where my priorities lie.

And then are other factors --
Being able to detach meant being able to let go and not let it affect you.
And then there's humbleness, which meant to having little to no need to compare and play the silly head game.

I'm not a humble person. However, I'm learning how to be able to be detached.


Well, I tried to drop the whole temporary highs thing on my way in adulthood. Trying not to be dependent on said highs.
But my SPED teacher had told me that it is sometimes needed in order to cope every hits of mistakes and faults of everyday interactions.

But I'd rather choose something more long term. So I choose untangling myself from my past -- this is not resilience nor a form of denial, this is a form of resolution.
So the memory of highs and lows would stop hitting me on the face whenever it comes up.

And it took me some years. Some memory needed years, some don't.

To prevent it from happening all over again, I have to learn to be detached -- it's not a form of numbing, but a form of internalization that do not end up in a form of weight being lugged around or a form of injury.

It's not easy for me.
One would had to know and acknowledge oneself emotionally -- and I dislike being emotional and had a habit of ignoring it.
Yet I'm getting there.

I'm still not a resilient person. Yet compared to many aspies, I had it a bit easier.
I was able to process certain emotions, solve it and move on entirely.

If I'm a resilient person, I'd still able to carry the damnable weight and lug it around with a limp, while being pelted around with pebbles.

No, rather I wanna know how to get the whole thing off my back, rid of the damn limp, catch those pebbles and throw it back.

And I'm good at directing my own emotional priorities.
However, it is not without flaw. I still misperceive, or be caught in a moment, or that emotions are simply too fast and sudden.


Yes, this is weird talk. Except not -- it's really how I think about this sort of topic.



As for your case?
I don't have any advice.

Only that emotions are messy. Memories are funny. And the ego and the idea of self is weird.


Had this been like 10+ years ago, I'd be able to relate.
Minus the imposter syndrome -- mine instead is just filled with pride and indignation, frustration and anger over guilt and shame.


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).


DuckHairback
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Jan 2021
Age: 42
Gender: Male
Posts: 545
Location: Dorset

11 Oct 2021, 6:49 am

firemonkey wrote:
There's the temporary high of getting a good score on a high range IQ test and letting people know(boasting,bragging, ego boosting) and then the rapid dive into 'imposter syndrome'. The negative self judgement. That sooner or later I'll be outed as a ' fraud'.


Perhaps its something to do with the knowledge that your highs are unearned?

I'm not saying that a high IQ isn't something to be happy about, but it's a fluke of genetics that some of us have high IQs. We didn't work for it. So does a good result in an IQ test really have any value? Can we justifiably feel proud of it? Similarly should someone with a naturally symmetrical face feel proud of a photograph of themselves that people find beautiful?

If someone were to use their high IQ to produce something, like a book or a mathematical or scientific reasoning - something that required an investment of significant effort as well as the possession of a natural 'gift' - then maybe the creeping self-doubt would be easier to shake off?



QuantumChemist
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,548
Location: Midwest

11 Oct 2021, 8:48 am

DuckHairback wrote:
If someone were to use their high IQ to produce something, like a book or a mathematical or scientific reasoning - something that required an investment of significant effort as well as the possession of a natural 'gift' - then maybe the creeping self-doubt would be easier to shake off?


I quite agree. It would be proof that the high IQ score was not a fluke. That process could involve inventing something that changes the world, even if in just a small way. Do not expect it to automatically happen though, as it requires effort to unlock the potential that may exist there.

A very high IQ really only means that you possibly have more tools to use in your mental toolbox. The mental tools need to be used on occasion to keep them from becoming rusty with the passage of time. How you use those tools is up to you. That is why some of the highest scoring IQs tend to do jobs that many do not expect them to be doing.

Something to consider if you want to keep your mental tools sharp:

https://enhancingbrain.com/careers-that ... ighest-iq/



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 78,477
Location: Queens, NYC

11 Oct 2021, 8:52 am

IQ is more a predictor of potential, rather than of achievement.



firemonkey
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,906
Location: Calne,England

11 Oct 2021, 9:19 am

DuckHairback wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
There's the temporary high of getting a good score on a high range IQ test and letting people know(boasting,bragging, ego boosting) and then the rapid dive into 'imposter syndrome'. The negative self judgement. That sooner or later I'll be outed as a ' fraud'.


Perhaps its something to do with the knowledge that your highs are unearned?

I'm not saying that a high IQ isn't something to be happy about, but it's a fluke of genetics that some of us have high IQs. We didn't work for it. So does a good result in an IQ test really have any value? Can we justifiably feel proud of it? Similarly should someone with a naturally symmetrical face feel proud of a photograph of themselves that people find beautiful?

If someone were to use their high IQ to produce something, like a book or a mathematical or scientific reasoning - something that required an investment of significant effort as well as the possession of a natural 'gift' - then maybe the creeping self-doubt would be easier to shake off?



There might indeed be something to that. I'm very much against the politically right wing attitude of rich= worked hard vs poor = lazy. I use the term 'genetic lottery'. I can congratulate someone on getting a good score, but that doesn't make he/she,in my mind, a better person than someone who got a lower score.

I've not done anything great with my intelligence. Spent the last 20 years spreading mental health and other,news to better inform people.That's required dedication, and a little effort, rather than brainpower. Greatest individual act putting my late half aunt in contact with her father's family.

A lot of the self doubt


_________________
Support mental health research
Please support mental health research
http://www.mentalhealthresearchuk.org.uk/
http://mcpin.org/
https://www.mqmentalhealth.org/


Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 78,477
Location: Queens, NYC

11 Oct 2021, 9:30 am

It's not like you've done NOTHING.....

You've accomplished things, my friend.