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firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 3:38 am

From as far back as I can remember I've been the cognitive equivalent of the person that bats >.310 in the minor league but <.230 in the major league. Is it due more to the ASD or the schizophrenia/schizoaffective? I'm not at all sure.


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klanka
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22 May 2022, 3:43 am

co-morbidity? I have asd but did farily well on exams. If that type of cognition is what you mean?



firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 4:36 am

klanka wrote:
co-morbidity? I have asd but did farily well on exams. If that type of cognition is what you mean?


I'm an autistic + sz/sz-a person. I blew hot and cold when it came to exams. Based on what my father told me,a few years I underperformed significantly at school.

What I'm talking about is the practical practical use of intelligence. I basically suck at it. I'd be up 's**t creek without a paddle', as my late wife would've put it, without the help and support I get. That's contrasted with being a member of several high IQ groups. They're more to do with vanity, getting a short lived ego boost and having something I'm not totally crap than actually doing anything useful IRL.


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aajiplanet
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22 May 2022, 6:19 am

No, buddy.



firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 6:29 am

San Francisco. Many years ago, as a child, I lived at 3922 Clay street , near the Presidio.


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Edna3362
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22 May 2022, 6:45 am

I don't understand your original post. Because I didn't get the reference. I don't know what major and minor leagues mean.

So I'll just refer to your second post -- about how you're contrasted with high IQ yet doesn't translate to practical.


While I'm not one of it, I don't think or believe that you're alone with that.

As an aspie, certainly not alone.
It's a pattern I observed around this forum; particularly those whose comorbidities include dyspraxia in general, if not those with VIQ>>PIQ profiles.

Related to your comorbidities (schizophrenia/schizoaffective), I'm not sure. Maybe. Maybe likely.


Double exceptionalities (those with gifted IQs and while also has any form of disability at the same time) can lean those profiles on more certain extremes -- in cases where one's disability outweighs their high IQ or giftedness.

Usually due to poor accomodations of either or both of an individual's case of untreated/unmanaged disability and poorly nurtured/neglected giftedness.

Typically related to mental health in general, or
cases of conflicting strengths and weaknesses, or cases of crippling overspecialization, or any of those at the same time and complicated.

Lastly... Giftedness actually needs special education for a reason.
Not every high IQ kid becomes an equally high overachiever.

Without cases of double exceptionality, it's to do with upbringing and environment.
Unless the high IQ kid is rich, or is also equally high EQ -- then it won't attain the same high achiever status.

Giftedness is actually the cohort of the rich.
Poor people with giftedness would likely just as suceptible to inherit their otherwise average to low IQ and poverty level ways of survival strategies of living in their respective society if left alone.

But I don't think that's how it is in your case.
So double exceptionality it is.


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firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 6:51 am

Edna3362 wrote:
I don't understand your original post. Because I didn't get the reference. I don't know what major and minor leagues mean.





Baseball. :)


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Dillogic
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22 May 2022, 6:59 am

I went downhill when Schizophrenia started up when it came to schooling. Before then, I'd do very well in school without trying. So, for me, Autism probably didn't affect much with schooling, other than maybe making me perform less than I did due to not really focusing on the work, even though I still did well.

A high IQ is pretty good for Schizophrenia in the end, even if a lot is taken from you. Functioning seems to be better due to higher levels of insight. It seems to have helped me anyway, and I was diagnosed far, far later than I should have been due to such (only "officially" in 2020).

So no, you're not alone.



firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 7:11 am

I wouldn't say my father was/is ultra rich. He had a fairly good career working for the Foreign office. Good enough to warrant a 'Who's who' entry. Retired as the diplomatic equivalent of a 2 star general. Compared to most I had a privileged upbringing.


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Edna3362
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22 May 2022, 7:34 am

firemonkey wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
I don't understand your original post. Because I didn't get the reference. I don't know what major and minor leagues mean.





Baseball. :)

A known sports by name thanks to American media, yet not a very big and known sport from where I came from. :oops:

In which minor leagues mean as a student, while major leagues mean as an adult dealing with societal affairs? :?:

Double exceptionality certainly applies.

It's clear that you got high IQ networks.
But do you also have an ND network in your younger days to go along with that?



I really wonder...
If there really is such thing as a double exceptionalities network that emphasizes on neither extremes -- and are generally "moderately functioning" in case to case basis instead of just extremes of overachievers and underachievers, independent high fliers self-accomodators and dependents needing networks of caregivers.

Why not the neither and both?.. :|
Just a thought.


Anyways.
If a gifted student is left alone, also even without the case of double exceptionalities...

Since they hadn't had to work very hard in their studies in their younger days, they ended up not building habits related to studying.

The need to deal with stress and pressure and how to cope with it, the need to come up and work with solutions instead of just pops in their head, the practice of asking for help...


It's a common pitfall in students who never have to work hard with their grades but ends up terrible at work.
One doesn't need to have high IQ or double exceptionality for that. It's how many gifted students becomes ex-gifted students.

Even I fell on such pitfall myself.
No academic issues for me from kinder to college with very negligent habits.

And I'm still playing catch up related to emotional and social development needed in the working world.
Partially autism, partially lack of practice and habit that supposed to prepare me for employment.

I understand wanting to do it in a brute force manner of achieving things. More so as a child and teenager.
But I gotta turn back from such idea and way of living, because it didn't work out.

I fell due to ignoring puberty alone and tried to brute force that -- imagine how serious mental illness would do to me with the same approach instead.


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naturalplastic
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22 May 2022, 8:10 am

I am sorta like that. A member of mensa. Good with book smarts, but weaker on practical day to day stuff. Though not totally helpless. Am an aspie. But dont have the other comorbids you have.



firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 8:14 am

Way back My first school in Bangkok urged my parents to get me tested as they thought I might have what we now call cerebral palsy. That was c1962/1963. I was 5/6 years old. The assessment at Great Ormond street showed that I wasn't. Possible alternatives weren't explored.

Even before the onset of SMI I struggled socially/ was clumsy and badly co-ordinated/had EF difficulties(disorganised and messy)/ was introverted then as a teenager became severely social phobic.

Image


I fit the 3rd group best.


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firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 8:45 am

naturalplastic wrote:
I am sorta like that. A member of mensa. Good with book smarts, but weaker on practical day to day stuff. Though not totally helpless. Am an aspie. But dont have the other comorbids you have.


It was only a few years that my father told me that tests being used in San Francisco in the mid 1960s placed my IQ near the 150 mark. He later gave a more precise 147. That was pre teen. Tests devised and /or normed by a psychometrician in the last few years place it from 142.4 to 153.6. It's reckoned the average person will get 10-15% of questions on a high range test right. I get about 73% verbal 52% numerical and 35% spatial high range questions right. As a single figure, using several methods of calculating it, 147/148 is the result that occurs most frequently i.e over 90% of the time . So not top notch brilliant, but not shabby either.

I've lost count of the number of times I've been treated as lazy or a PITA because I couldn't do nearly as well at y as I had x.


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firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 9:12 am

147- 148 iare by averaging the scores. Using https://assessingpsyche.wordpress.com/2 ... eir-parts/ and separating those psychometrician tests into fluid and crystallised gives a range of 150 to a 159.


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naturalplastic
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22 May 2022, 2:10 pm

I was just over the cutoff line to join mensa at 130. You would qualify with room to spare. So if youre going by IQ numbers I would be a knuckle dragging chimp compared to you.



When I was eight I knew all of the planets and their characteristics, but I could barely ride a two wheel bike.



firemonkey
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22 May 2022, 10:07 pm

I was 13 when I learnt to ride a 2 wheel bike


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