What about ASD can't U find online that yr desperate 2 know?

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Elgee
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22 May 2022, 11:58 am

Is there anything about ASD that you're desperate to know but can't find online? I'm curious about what others here are seeking info on but can't find.

For instance, I couldn't find much on whether or not an autistic preschool boy could get misdiagnosed with something else. I found one good article on this, just one. He could get misdiagnosed with ADHD or SPD.

There's other things I've googled but can't find formal information.



Joe90
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22 May 2022, 12:13 pm

I'd like to find out more information on diagnosed people who are very ashamed and embarrassed of their autism and spend their whole lives hating themselves for having autism. All I find is information for parents of newly diagnosed children.

Also I'd like to read up more about lives of already diagnosed teenage girls with autism and how they cope with school - but UK information, not American. But it just comes up with information on how to notice signs of autism in teenagers or how to get a teenager diagnosed. I just want to compare my teenage life to how other autistic teens managed through secondary school.

There's so much information on adults getting diagnosed and all that, like it seems more common to go through childhood without knowing you have autism unless you're severe, and I feel like the only girl with only mild ASD who got a diagnosis in childhood.


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DanielW
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22 May 2022, 12:14 pm

ADHD and SPD are often co-morbid with ASD, so it doesn't need to be a misdiagnosis. Surely you've been able to find that much out online.

If you are concerned, you can always check the DSM or ICD (or both) rather than play Dr. Google.



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22 May 2022, 12:43 pm

What is empathy without social skills.
Quote the last 4 words, and goggle can't answer.
Except my own previous posts from this very forum and a random thread from reddit because of a well placed order of words. :lol:

What is the basis of executive functions without regulation?

Autistics without anxiety disorders/getting stuck to mental health issues/severe trauma/phobias.

ND cases without comorbidities in general.

The difference between autistics from UK and US, and autistics from SEA or my country's region and socioeconomic status in general.

What is the basis of 'subtle sensitivities' related to autism.

A few scenarios that matches mine;
autistics that do not startle easy, autistics who don't believe autism means being a social loser, autistics who cannot afford routines, autistics who lived without psych meds...
And a few more I cannot enumerate.

Varying questions about autistic hyperlexia, but without high verbal IQ and precocious reading.

The line between alexithymics who lives in chaos, constant confusion, poor discernment and cluelessness -- from alexithymics who lives in stoicism model of awareness, order, rationality, discipline and productivity.


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Elgee
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22 May 2022, 1:09 pm

DanielW wrote:
ADHD and SPD are often co-morbid with ASD, so it doesn't need to be a misdiagnosis. Surely you've been able to find that much out online.

If you are concerned, you can always check the DSM or ICD (or both) rather than play Dr. Google.


If a preschool boy has all three (ASD, ADHD and SPD), but was diagnosed with only ADHD and SPD, and the parents were told he doesn't have ASD, then his ASD was missed. The others were properly diagnosed, but not the ASD.



Fnord
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22 May 2022, 1:13 pm

I would like to find statistics on the number of people on the autistic spectrum who were misdiagnosed before the mid-1990s with ADD/ADHD, Mental Retardation, Schizophrenia, or just plain old laziness.



IsabellaLinton
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22 May 2022, 1:26 pm

I'd like to know more about the experiences of autistic single parents. (Not to be confused with "autism parents"). :eew:



Pteranomom
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22 May 2022, 2:29 pm

Well of course he could get misdiagnosed; people get misdiagnosed all the time. What are you looking for in particular? Misdiagnosis rates or things he could get misdiagnosed with?



DanielW
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22 May 2022, 2:59 pm

Elgee wrote:
DanielW wrote:
ADHD and SPD are often co-morbid with ASD, so it doesn't need to be a misdiagnosis. Surely you've been able to find that much out online.

If you are concerned, you can always check the DSM or ICD (or both) rather than play Dr. Google.


If a preschool boy has all three (ASD, ADHD and SPD), but was diagnosed with only ADHD and SPD, and the parents were told he doesn't have ASD, then his ASD was missed. The others were properly diagnosed, but not the ASD.


My point was how do you know he has ASD if its not been diagnosed? If he doesn't meet the diagnostic criteria, or doesn't meet it yet...he doesn't technically have it.

Since this boy does have ADHD and SPD, he will likely receive support services and if it follows that if ASD is in fact still suspected it can be tested for.



Pteranomom
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22 May 2022, 3:25 pm

I want to know how to convince my son to try new foods and that the baby isn't so bad.



Elgee
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22 May 2022, 3:53 pm

DanielW wrote:
Elgee wrote:
DanielW wrote:
ADHD and SPD are often co-morbid with ASD, so it doesn't need to be a misdiagnosis. Surely you've been able to find that much out online.

If you are concerned, you can always check the DSM or ICD (or both) rather than play Dr. Google.


If a preschool boy has all three (ASD, ADHD and SPD), but was diagnosed with only ADHD and SPD, and the parents were told he doesn't have ASD, then his ASD was missed. The others were properly diagnosed, but not the ASD.


My point was how do you know he has ASD if its not been diagnosed? If he doesn't meet the diagnostic criteria, or doesn't meet it yet...he doesn't technically have it.

Since this boy does have ADHD and SPD, he will likely receive support services and if it follows that if ASD is in fact still suspected it can be tested for.


He's my nephew. At 3 he was only diagnosed with a speech delay (wasn't talking; only noises) and nothing else. At five he still didn't have conversational capacity; just fragmented sentences or phrases. Where is this speech delay coming from? Now, initially, I thought he might be autistic, until I saw how people-needy he was. But then again, I've heard of autistic young kids seeming people-needy. His mother said he was tested for ASD at 3 and didn't have it. But his nails were bitten and he frequently had his fingers in his mouth (stimming?). And there's no polite way to say this, but he was very odd in behavior; something was going on. My other brother (not the child's father who's my first brother) and parents immediately noticed it when the boy came out to live in our state at age 3.

His tween sister told me she thought he was "developmentally disabled."

Many parents are in denial at first and refuse to believe anything could be wrong. They only saw a speech delay in an otherwise normal, NT, intelligent boy. But it was obvious to me, my other brother and parents that, at a minimum, the boy had ID.

I'm now suspecting autism (haven't had contact with them since he was 5). So I googled my initial query and came up empty.



Elgee
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22 May 2022, 3:55 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
I'd like to know more about the experiences of autistic single parents. (Not to be confused with "autism parents"). :eew:


Here's the link to an autistic woman who was a single parent to one child right from the start (child is now eight), but in order to read her stuff you have to be a member of Medium:

https://medium.com/honestly-yours



Last edited by Elgee on 22 May 2022, 4:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

DanielW
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22 May 2022, 3:57 pm

Pteranomom wrote:
I want to know how to convince my son to try new foods and that the baby isn't so bad.


That will likely just take time...new babies are a lot to adjust to. All kinds of loud sounds and scents. They tend to disrupt routines etc. Its not forever :-)



Elgee
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22 May 2022, 3:59 pm

Pteranomom wrote:
I want to know how to convince my son to try new foods and that the baby isn't so bad.


Actually, there's a lot online about how to get kids to eat new foods, though I don't know if any of this info is specifically for autisic kids. But the technique I have in mind should work just as well for autistic kids. Get your son involved with the preparation of the food you want him to try. Kids find it nearly impossible to avoid eating something that THEY helped prepare. Even if he's very young, there's something he can do.

If he's only 2 or 3, for instance, he could tear apart lettuce leaves. If you pour all the seasonings into a paper cup, then hand him the cup and tell him to pour it into the food, this will be a big deal to him if he's very young. He can also mix things with a wooden spoon, or maybe "hold" the bowl as you mix things up. He can lay slices of tomato on the meatloaf, or place vegetables into a bowl. Of course, if he's older there's more things he can do like rinse things, spread sauce around, etc. "I helped make it!" He'll more likely want to eat it.



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22 May 2022, 4:20 pm

I don't say I'm exactly desperate for this, having survived without it for my entire life, but it would be great if there was an online list of (free of charge) tele-counsellors (operating via email) offering an intelligent dialogue about the Aspie traits I have that give me problems, with a view to finding better coping strategies.



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22 May 2022, 4:42 pm

Why does it seem that Aspies seem to have all manner health issues .
Seems oddly enough that some Aspies have often common diagnoses of other health issues ??


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