often make grammatical mistakes when speaking?

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HiccupHaddock
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15 Jun 2022, 3:28 pm

Dear all,
I'm wondering does anyone else find that they often make grammatical mistakes, or the order of words in a sentence comes out wrong, when speaking?
I find this happens when I'm speaking, even when I know the concept I want to get across, and even if I am speaking relatively slowly.
It's quite strange, as I have a good understanding of grammar and don't make those kinds of mistakes when writing.
Is it some kind of speech dyslexia (or is there a better name)?
I'm wondering is it a common aspect of autism?



temp1234
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17 Jun 2022, 6:02 am

Is English your second language? People whose first language is not English tend to be like that. They can have a very good understanding of English grammar. When they write, they have enough time to write correctly. However, when speaking, they sometimes can't intuitively/naturally come up with a sentence with correct grammar quickly enough.

If English is your first language/mother tongue, the same may still apply if you don't have this skill of "intuitively/naturally/spontaneously" constructing a correct sentence quickly. I suspect that it could be due to one of the autism-related problems? Maybe? Maybe similar to difficulty in naturally learning body language, resulting in odd body language?

Just my thoughts.



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17 Jun 2022, 6:12 am

yes, this is common in autism and is part of sensory processing struggles. Seeing a speech language pathologist for diagnosis of the specific struggle and therapy can sometimes help!


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Edna3362
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17 Jun 2022, 6:16 am

It does in cases with autism.
From working memory issues usually related to sensory issues, to uneven cognitive profiles that don't favor verbal abilities, to straight up aphasia.


It happens to me more often whenever I speak with my native language than with English despite using it more often and on a daily basis.

Didn't helped that I don't particularly have an aptitude for linguistic abilities -- it's the opposite even.
And it's always unnatural no matter how much "practice" I have.

Patterns within patterns within patterns -- not a natural exercise of verbal thought, but more like a manual translation of sorts in every time I read, hear, speak, write... Just every time words are involved.

And I have no choice.
And sometimes it hurts like how overstimulation hurts.


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shortfatbalduglyman
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17 Jun 2022, 9:00 am

I do the same thing

But plenty of people frequently make grammatical errors. They are not all autistic

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Besides it doesn't matter if the grammar is correct, it only matters if the listener got your message



kitesandtrainsandcats
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17 Jun 2022, 9:50 am

HiccupHaddock wrote:
or the order of words in a sentence comes out wrong, when speaking?
I find this happens when I'm speaking, even when I know the concept I want to get across, and even if I am speaking relatively slowly.
It's quite strange, as I have a good understanding of grammar and don't make those kinds of mistakes when writing.


That sounds like my situation.

Quote:
I'm wondering is it a common aspect of autism?


I don't have the info to address that but can say I have apparently been autistic all my life yet the word order thing when speaking seemed to appear with the onset of fibromyalgia and ME/CFS and is becoming more frequent as time goes on & gets really frequent during a ME/CFS flare.
But even then I do fine at word order when writing.


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ToughDiamond
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17 Jun 2022, 9:53 am

Yes the spoken word isn't generally expected to be as grammatically correct as the written word. I make more mistakes when speaking, and my language is less tied to exact grammar, but I doubt I'm very different to NTs in that respect.



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17 Jun 2022, 10:38 am

If I'm speaking to someone I'm familiar with and there's no stress, I seem to be about as well or even better than typing. If I'm speaking to someone I'm unfamiliar with and there's stress for whatever reason (routine disruption being a big one), I will pause, exchange words entirely, stutter, blabber on and so on.

I have remnants of language disorders still that will manifest in the latter situation. Expressive mostly. Sometimes if I'm really overwhelmed, I'll often misinterpret language when it comes to receptive too.



HeroOfHyrule
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19 Jun 2022, 11:47 pm

I make grammatical errors and mispronounce words all the time. I also stutter a lot. I can write/type perfectly fine, but can't really talk all that well, so I don't speak much.



hmk66
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25 Jun 2022, 12:48 am

I think way faster than I can speak. Sometimes I notice that I said a sentence which is grammatically correct, but with missing parts. Things that I wanted to say, but actually didn't say. Sometimes the other person I am talking to, knows however what I actually wanted to say.