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Gammeldans
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03 Jul 2022, 3:45 am

I've been hearing about how good people with ASD are at dealing with difficulties when engaging in something they find intetesting. I myself often get really frustrated and irritated. I always thought that this was common but in fact most people seem to be good at dealing with the difficulties.
I think people are lying or giving misinformation. I don't think people with ASD are that good at dealing with the difficulties.
People with ASD get stuck (cognitive rigidity) so finding a solution to a problem can be difficult at times. Luckily, we are also very good at dealing with difficulties at times.
What do you think? How come so many aspies talk about how enjoyable it is to deal with difficulties? What about cognitive rigidity?
Perhaps getting stuck and getting extremely irritated are not really the same thing?
I mean, I guess I am one of the few aspies who don't know enough sbout breaking down difficulties into smaller ones that are easier to deal with.
One theory is that people rfally only do what they find easy but I don't find it a very good theory. It only say that people don't keep working when things are difficult. Another theory is that aspies who deals with difficulties very well have had very good teachers or friends who helped.


"Cognitive rigidity is the consequence of a lack of mental flexibility. It could be defined as the inability to change behavior or beliefs when they are ineffective in order to reach your objective."
https://www.cognifit.com/science/cognit ... s/shifting



kraftiekortie
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03 Jul 2022, 5:45 am

I probably have “cognitive rigidity” sometimes.

I avoid situations where I have to be decisive. This keeps me out of practice, thereby making me really anxious when I have to make an important decision.



Dear_one
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03 Jul 2022, 2:16 pm

This may not be strongly tied to ASD. John Cleese notes that creative people are able to tolerate indecision longer than others.



Gammeldans
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04 Jul 2022, 5:42 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I probably have “cognitive rigidity” sometimes.

I avoid situations where I have to be decisive. This keeps me out of practice, thereby making me really anxious when I have to make an important decision.

Who are making the decisions then?



Gammeldans
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04 Jul 2022, 5:44 am

Dear_one wrote:
This may not be strongly tied to ASD. John Cleese notes that creative people are able to tolerate indecision longer than others.

What is a creative person?



autisticelders
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04 Jul 2022, 7:53 am

I like puzzles to solve, love doing research but not about personal problems or emotional stuff. Maybe it comes down to the individual and the things they do best. I was not able to overcome struggles with interpersonal relationships or social/emotional things without help and explanations and although I understand many of those social dynamics these days I am helpless to fix the things I struggle with (neurology!). On the other hand I love factual questions and searching for answers of things based in science or non emotional stuff. Each person is probably good at different things. Each of us may have neurological struggles but each will be different in their skills, choices, etc. I don't think generalities can apply in a strict way.


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Dear_one
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04 Jul 2022, 8:10 am

Gammeldans wrote:
Dear_one wrote:
This may not be strongly tied to ASD. John Cleese notes that creative people are able to tolerate indecision longer than others.

What is a creative person?

John Cleese would be a good example. They create original content that makes sense and helps others.



QuantumChemist
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05 Jul 2022, 9:25 am

Creativity is the ability to look at things with a new perspective and interact with it. Some would call it “outside the box” thinking. Not everyone has this talent, but it can be more prevalent to those on the spectrum. One can have creativity and rigid thinking at the same time. The rigid part can help guide the creative part it certain ways. It all depends on how one views the problem at hand.

I have always had both present in my mind, but have learned how to control my rigid thinking when I want to let my creative side take over. It can take some effort to be able to get to that stage at times. If I am too tired, I lose some of my control as I cannot put in the extra energy.



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05 Jul 2022, 10:02 am

I thrive on situations where I have to be decisive.  Obstacles only occur when: (1) people are more concerned with fixing the blame than with solving the problem; (2) people are more concerned with how others will think and feel about the solution than with solving the problem; or (3) implementing the solution gets bogged down because just one stupid, ignorant, uninvolved bureaucrat believes everything is fine and no further action needs to be taken.



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05 Jul 2022, 11:44 am

QuantumChemist wrote:
Creativity is the ability to look at things with a new perspective and interact with it. Some would call it “outside the box” thinking. Not everyone has this talent, but it can be more prevalent to those on the spectrum. One can have creativity and rigid thinking at the same time. The rigid part can help guide the creative part it certain ways. It all depends on how one views the problem at hand.


I was "rigid" about expecting more efficiency. I would always ask myself if a right angle was really the best, and try to get two or more functions from each part. My Avatar shows a windshield that also works as the door hinge. Underneath, the chassis has carefully controlled flex instead of separate springs and hinges. The only mechanical pivots are the ball joints that also allow the steering.



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05 Jul 2022, 12:54 pm

Fnord wrote:
I thrive on situations where I have to be decisive.  Obstacles only occur when: (1) people are more concerned with fixing the blame than with solving the problem; (2) people are more concerned with how others will think and feel about the solution than with solving the problem; or (3) implementing the solution gets bogged down because just one stupid, ignorant, uninvolved bureaucrat believes everything is fine and no further action needs to be taken.


You described perfectly the last large project I had the misfortune to be the lead engineer.


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Dear_one
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05 Jul 2022, 1:43 pm

A child has two basic options. One is learning how to do a job, and the other is learning how to get other people to do it for them. Unfortunately, the latter group winds up in charge.



Fnord
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05 Jul 2022, 2:56 pm

goatfish57 wrote:
Fnord wrote:
I thrive on situations where I have to be decisive.  Obstacles only occur when: (1) people are more concerned with fixing the blame than with solving the problem; (2) people are more concerned with how others will think and feel about the solution than with solving the problem; or (3) implementing the solution gets bogged down because just one stupid, ignorant, uninvolved bureaucrat believes everything is fine and no further action needs to be taken.
You described perfectly the last large project I had the misfortune to be the lead engineer.
Bureaucrats are the bane of engineers -- we know what needs to be done, and the bureaucrats try to prevent us from doing it.  Sadly, this is one problem that I simply cannot solve.  How can an analytic person reason with the solipsistic mind?



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05 Jul 2022, 2:58 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I probably have “cognitive rigidity” sometimes.

I avoid situations where I have to be decisive. This keeps me out of practice, thereby making me really anxious when I have to make an important decision.


I'm so indecisive it can take several goes to get Alexa to do what I want.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
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05 Jul 2022, 4:05 pm

Fnord wrote:
Bureaucrats are the bane of engineers -- we know what needs to be done, and the bureaucrats try to prevent us from doing it.  Sadly, this is one problem that I simply cannot solve.  How can an analytic person reason with the solipsistic mind?


If logic is not working, it probably never will. You can study what a fool responds to, and present that appearance, like any normal sales person. I knew one guy who, when asked for a proposal, always prepared three, knowing which one would be chosen, but giving the suits the impression that they had input. Perhaps the ideal situation is to latch on to someone who wants to steal your credit, and make sure that you can blackmail them any time, and that they know their job depends on your continued cooperation. That way, you can just tell them what needs to be done, and they will sell the idea for you, and make sure you have the funds, etc.



Fnord
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05 Jul 2022, 4:15 pm

Dear_one wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Bureaucrats are the bane of engineers -- we know what needs to be done, and the bureaucrats try to prevent us from doing it.  Sadly, this is one problem that I simply cannot solve.  How can an analytic person reason with the solipsistic mind?
If logic is not working, it probably never will. You can study what a fool responds to, and present that appearance, like any normal sales person. I knew one guy who, when asked for a proposal, always prepared three, knowing which one would be chosen, but giving the suits the impression that they had input. Perhaps the ideal situation is to latch on to someone who wants to steal your credit, and make sure that you can blackmail them any time, and that they know their job depends on your continued cooperation. That way, you can just tell them what needs to be done, and they will sell the idea for you, and make sure you have the funds, etc.
Sometimes, I just go ahead and do what needs to be done, trusting in the idea that it is easier to be forgiven for success than it is to gain permission for action.

"Damn the bureaucrats!  Full speed ahead!" -- Daniel Farragut, MSEE