Page 1 of 1 [ 13 posts ] 

ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 30,417
Location: Long Island, New York

30 Nov 2022, 12:35 pm

People with autism are not 'indifferent or hypo-sensitive' to pain

Quote:
People with autism have normal pain thresholds but increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, concludes a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

"This evidence demonstrating enhanced pain sensitivity warrants changing the common belief that autistic individuals experience less pain," according to the report by Prof. Irit Weissman-Fogel of University of Haifa, Israel, and colleagues. They believe their findings highlight the need for increased awareness, which may impact effective treatment of pain in people with autism.

The researchers aimed to test the "prevailing assumption" that people with autism are hypo-sensitive to pain. Current diagnostic criteria suggest that autistic people demonstrate "apparent indifference" to pain or temperature. Yet most previous studies have not shown differences in pain sensitivity in autistic individuals.

Prof. Weissman-Fogel and colleagues performed in-depth laboratory tests of pain perception in 104 adults, 52 with autism. This sample is the largest as of yet testing pain psychophysics in autism. The two groups had similar scores on a brief cognitive test. People with autism had higher use of psychiatric medications, and rated themselves as having greater anxiety as well as higher sensitivity to pain and to daily environmental stimuli (such as smell, noise, light). This research project was funded by the Israel Science Foundation (ISF; 1005/17).

On quantitative sensory tests, there were no differences in thermal and pain detection thresholds between the autistic and non-autistic groups. This indicates normal pain and thermal thresholds, suggesting "normal functioning of the peripheral nervous system" among participants with autism.

However, the autistic group gave consistently higher pain ratings in response to various stimuli above their pain threshold, proving pain hypersensitivity. The tests also provided evidence that people with autism can successfully inhibit short pain stimuli but not long-lasting pain stimuli. Importantly, experiencing long-lasting pain in daily life is a risk factor for developing chronic pain.

Together, the findings suggest that people with autism have a "pro-nociceptive" pain modulation profile: their brain appears more active in facilitating pain experience and less active in inhibiting continuous pain. This is consistent with the theory of excitatory/inhibitory imbalance as an underlying mechanism of autism spectrum disorder – but one that has been neglected in terms of pain processing.

The study questions the perception that people with autism experience less pain, and instead suggests that they may have enhanced pain sensitivity. Prof. Weissman-Fogel and colleagues write, "This misinterpretation can lead to late diagnosis and poor treatment causing suffering and exacerbating the autistic symptoms" – potentially increasing the risk of developing chronic pain conditions. While their study focused on a group of autistic people with essentially normal cognitive function, the researchers write, "these results may also apply to people with autism whose cognitive and verbal communication impairments may eliminate their ability to communicate their pain."


Indifference or hypersensitivity? Solving the riddle of the pain profile in individuals with autism


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


kitesandtrainsandcats
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2016
Age: 59
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,637
Location: Missouri

30 Nov 2022, 5:21 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
People with autism are not 'indifferent or hypo-sensitive' to pain
Quote:
The researchers aimed to test the "prevailing assumption" that people with autism are


Why is so much stuff about we who are autistic based merely on what NT's assume ...? :( :evil:


_________________
"There are a thousand things that can happen when you go light a rocket engine, and only one of them is good."
Tom Mueller of SpaceX, in Air and Space, Jan. 2011


Da_Zero_A_Dieci
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 26 Nov 2022
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 545

30 Nov 2022, 7:15 pm

Perhaps because the concept of normality was introduced in the mid-1800s.

§
Why 90% of the world is not ND
So they assume things by choosing a false concept as a term of comparison, one is normal when one falls within characteristics that fall within their neurology.
§
What you write is partly true because we do not know the percentage of scientific researchers who are not really ND.
§
You and I are unique yet different beings from them.

§
Unfortunately, do not regret the things we feel and they do not feel them, but they describe them by studying subjects according to them all similar and everything falls into dysfunctionality.

§

Let's assume it was the other way around: they are the minority and we describe them



Da_Zero_A_Dieci
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 26 Nov 2022
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 545

30 Nov 2022, 7:36 pm

About the pain.
During a holiday period (Halloween), my dentist took a few days off.

In those days I stayed for three consecutive days enduring a strong molar neuralgia that broke me for three quarters.


I remember that I tolerated it because at 19 I didn't even use an Aspirin, any analgesic drug.

§


A scientific study is just a scientific study, an important concept.

Because it realizes the results of deductions which then perhaps generate beliefs that do not adhere to our reality.


§
I love scientific research.

In general, we try to demonstrate something instead we need to try to place ourselves in a critical condition otherwise we validate a result and obtain false data

§

This is not in reference to the research you publish, even if the vaunted large number of subjects is limited.

§

I'll post a link that reminds me of one of Norman Doidge's books that I read about 4 years ago.


§
Brain healing

§

The first chapter mentions Michael Moskowitz who, in order to self-treat chronic pain deriving from a sports accident, mentally creates a technique which reduces it in about 8 months, and cancels it in many months.

This thinking of three images (I summarize because the speech would be very wide)

§

The images are from an MRI of his brain after the accident.

One acute, one chronic, and another that imagines a person's brain without any pain.

§
All this is based on the neuronal neuroplasticity of the brain, which is present in all people and always.

§
The link translates automatically if you click on the third six-pointed cogwheel icon.

It makes a small clockwise rotation and the translation goes into automatic mode

About the pain.
During a holiday period (Halloween), my dentist took a few days off.

In those days I stayed for three consecutive days enduring a strong molar neuralgia that broke me for three quarters.


I remember that I tolerated it because at 19 I didn't even use an Aspirin, any analgesic drug.

§


A scientific study is just a scientific study, an important concept.

Because it realizes the results of deductions which then perhaps generate beliefs that do not adhere to our reality.


§
I love scientific research.

In general, we try to demonstrate something instead we need to try to place ourselves in a critical condition otherwise we validate a result and obtain false data

§

This is not in reference to the research you publish, even if the vaunted large number of subjects is limited.

§

I'll post a link that reminds me of one of Norman Doidge's books that I read about 4 years ago.


§
Brain healing

§

The first chapter mentions Michael Moskowitz who, in order to self-treat chronic pain deriving from a sports accident, mentally creates a technique which reduces it in about 8 months, and cancels it in many months.

This thinking of three images (I summarize because the speech would be very broad)

§

The images are from an MRI of his brain after the accident.

One acute, one chronic, and another that imagines a person's brain without any pain.

§
All this is based on the neuronal neuroplasticity of the brain, which is present in all people and always.

§
The link translates automatically if you click on the third six-pointed cogwheel icon.




It makes a small clockwise rotation and the translation goes into automatic mode

About the pain.
During a holiday period (Halloween), my dentist took a few days off.

In those days I stayed for three consecutive days enduring a strong molar neuralgia that broke me for three quarters.


I remember that I tolerated it because at 19 I didn't even use an Aspirin, any analgesic drug.

§


A scientific study is just a scientific study, an important concept.

Because it realizes the results of deductions which then perhaps generate beliefs that do not adhere to our reality.


§
I love scientific research.

In general, we try to demonstrate something instead we need to try to place ourselves in a critical condition otherwise we validate a result and obtain false data

§

This is not in reference to the research you publish, even if the vaunted large number of subjects is limited.

§

I'll post a link that reminds me of one of Norman Doidge's books that I read about 4 years ago.


§
Brain healing

§

The first chapter mentions Michael Moskowitz who, in order to self-treat chronic pain deriving from a sports accident, mentally creates a technique which reduces it in about 8 months, and cancels it in many months.

This thinking of three images (I summarize because the speech would be very broad)

§

The images are from an MRI of his brain after the accident.

One acute, one chronic, and another that imagines a person's brain without any pain.

§
All this is based on the neuronal neuroplasticity of the brain, which is present in all people and always.

§
The link translates automatically if you click on the third six-pointed cogwheel icon.

cc subtitles (1)


It makes a small clockwise rotation and the translation goes into automatic mode

You can choose the language you know best, the most important ones are listed, just scroll through it to understand the video in Italian

Thank you

You can choose the language you know best, the most important ones are listed, just scroll through it to understand the video in Italian

Thank you

You can choose the language you know best, the most important ones are listed, just scroll through it to understand the video in Italian

Thank you



kitesandtrainsandcats
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2016
Age: 59
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,637
Location: Missouri

30 Nov 2022, 7:48 pm

Da_Zero_A_Dieci wrote:
Let's assume it was the other way around: they are the minority and we describe them


I guess first it would have to be decided whether that exercise is founded on existing majority rules or new rules we create.

Because the existing rules for the exercise appear to run something like:
"
We could ask the minority to describe their state of being, but we the majority are fully aware that the minority are too poorly developed to be able to express themselves and their experience. Therefore we the majority are compelled to tell them what their proper experience of being the minority is. And, hey, if the minority weren't so poorly developed then they wouldn't have been reduced to being the minority now would they! Man it sure sucks to be them, I'm so glad we're us and not them!
"


_________________
"There are a thousand things that can happen when you go light a rocket engine, and only one of them is good."
Tom Mueller of SpaceX, in Air and Space, Jan. 2011


Da_Zero_A_Dieci
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 26 Nov 2022
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 545

30 Nov 2022, 8:16 pm

kitesandtrainsandcats wrote:
Da_Zero_A_Dieci wrote:
Let's assume it was the other way around: they are the minority and we describe them


I guess first it would have to be decided whether that exercise is founded on existing majority rules or new rules we create.

Because the existing rules for the exercise appear to run something like:
"
We could ask the minority to describe their state of being, but we the majority are fully aware that the minority are too poorly developed to be able to express themselves and their experience. Therefore we the majority are compelled to tell them what their proper experience of being the minority is. And, hey, if the minority weren't so poorly developed then they wouldn't have been reduced to being the minority now would they! Man it sure sucks to be them, I'm so glad we're us and not them!

Hi, kitesandtrainsandcats!


§

You know, before I didn't understand who you were.
How it worked.
And when my father asked why I had problems, I replied that I didn't know what they were but yes, I had them.


After some time I realized I had Asperger's.

I wish I could tell you but yesterday was the 10th anniversary of his death.

§

I honestly don't imagine myself different from how I am, I always try to improve myself in everything I do.
But, in my own way, I don't particularly like neurotypicals.

§

You know, a bit like asking a boy born black if he's proud to be the way he is: he'd answer that he doesn't imagine otherwise.

§

A very nice trait in most of us NDs is the total absence of bias.

Even to always honestly say what we think, they often do not do this



lostonearth35
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Jan 2010
Age: 48
Gender: Female
Posts: 11,379
Location: Lost on Earth, waddya think?

30 Nov 2022, 8:21 pm

I was anything but insensitive to pain as a kid, no wonder I was never diagnosed until adulthood. From these so-called studies you'd think we actually had feelings and emotions like most other people and that dehumanizing us is somehow wrong. :roll:



Da_Zero_A_Dieci
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 26 Nov 2022
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 545

30 Nov 2022, 8:33 pm

So I'm alexithymic so I struggle to understand emotions.

§
We experience some of them very intensely, we struggle to describe them, and in my case to understand them for example.


§
Chances are you've never been diagnosed.

Because it's difficult.
*Only 1 in 4 girls out of boys are diagnosed.*


This is also because girls are more intelligent socially so they look like them even if they are not, they do masking, so they blend in better socially.
§
From how you answered it is evident that you are full of feelings; don't demoralize yourself



Caz72
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Feb 2013
Age: 50
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,068
Location: England

30 Nov 2022, 8:37 pm

what do them big S mean?


_________________
Have diagnosis of autism.
Have a neurotypical son.


Da_Zero_A_Dieci
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 26 Nov 2022
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 545

30 Nov 2022, 8:58 pm

The research deals with physical pain, there is also a psychological one, it is depression, pathological anxiety, social stress, social misunderstandings, interactions in which we often struggle mortally, it is the non-immediate reciprocity to a normal smile .

We are rationally empathic empathies are of two types, not just the typical one.

We just have to understand the situations that are sometimes not clear to us. I have known Aspergers and low functioning autistics who are extremely empathetic.

We must be careful who defines us in a schematic way.

The Doctors asked me what my condition consisted of.

I replied: "In thinking with a different neurology"
§
In the texts reference is made to deficits with respect to the norm:

The standard simply doesn't exist.

It's based on their running average, not ours which they can't figure out.

§
The doctor who diagnosed me is a scientific researcher.
He too has Asperger's, in the first two hours of the visit he asked me a lot of questions.

He confided in me that he immediately framed me as Asperger's.

§
He seems icy in the making, but also deals with children.
It helps them from an early age.

His emotions are not seen, but they are concrete.
§
As a medicine enthusiast I write to you: the main emotions are experienced by all individuals.

(Sorry I wrote a lot, I don't know how to synthesize and it's not my language I hope you understand what I wrote, thanks)



DanielW
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2019
Age: 34
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,028
Location: PNW USA

30 Nov 2022, 9:10 pm

Caz72 wrote:
what do them big S mean?


The S shaped symbol ( § ) means "section" and is used to show a new section of text.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 30,417
Location: Long Island, New York

30 Nov 2022, 10:08 pm

kitesandtrainsandcats wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
People with autism are not 'indifferent or hypo-sensitive' to pain
Quote:
The researchers aimed to test the "prevailing assumption" that people with autism are


Why is so much stuff about we who are autistic based merely on what NT's assume ...? :( :evil:

Majority rules


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


Da_Zero_A_Dieci
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 26 Nov 2022
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 545

04 Dec 2022, 7:15 pm

DanielW wrote:
Caz72 wrote:
what do them big S mean?


The S shaped symbol ( § ) means "section" and is used to show a new section of text.


Ciao : Sorry if the symbol causes annoyance I will not use it again.

I tend to separate parts of the text

I divide my writing into sections.

I easily write wrong.

So I correct several times, although several translations occur in my mind.

I think in pictures.

I quickly translate into words, then write.

*Fast maybe affects

I don't know if it's a deficit or a failure to keep up between thought and writing.

in Italy I think I wrote at least fifty thousand posts like this.

Between groups and forums.

I hope it doesn't bother you.

Yes : the intent is well described by DanielW

I also tend to speak fast even on complex speeches.

I think it's a mistake on my part, you have to communicate.

In a post I put the example of Jacob Barnett I tend to do so in dialogue.

It's only good in certain contexts.

In normal social ones it's not good, it's not effective