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DanielW
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04 Dec 2022, 12:49 pm

Those kinds of "gifts" are only valuable if someone else can exploit them - otherwise, they can be curses.



firemonkey
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04 Dec 2022, 12:53 pm

^ I agree quite a lot with that article. I'm varying degrees of crap at a lot of things.



QuantumChemist
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04 Dec 2022, 3:05 pm

Gammeldans wrote:
QuantumChemist wrote:
My third grade class was tested. I was put into the highly to exceptionally gifted category based upon my exam scores. My reading ability was off the charts (high school graduate level), science/math advanced (high school level) and reasoning was quite developed for my age. I was tutoring high school students in math and science when I was still in elementary school. By the sixth grade, I could have skipped two levels academically in all subjects, yet my teachers attempted to hold me back because I did not fit into anything socially. All of my friends were two years younger than me, as I could relate to them better than my classmates.

Over time, I honed my different gifted skills to use at my job. I know I can mentally visualize at a level that is very advanced compared to my peers. It allows me to develop new materials and theoretically test them before I go into the lab to actually make them. When I read a scientific paper, I can easily adapt the research for a new application that is much different than the original application. Many peers have asked me how I can do it. It just occurs naturally to me. I can relate to Nicola Tesla, as he had the advanced visual skills ability also. He was much better at applying them to his work than I am able to. I would be happy if I could achieve only a tiny fraction of what he did.

As for the concept of needing a certain I.Q. range to match others with conversations, this does occur on occasions. I have found that one can make the topic less complicated to the other person in such a way that they can usually understand. Unfortunately it can be challenging as a neural divergent to tell if another person understands you. I will admit that I used to do data dumping on others when a special topic was brought up. It generally overwhelmed the other person, as they were not expecting to get that much information back at one time. I learned to release much smaller chunks of data at first to see if they could absorb the information before proceeding with more.

Being gifted is not always a positive thing. I have been ostracized by peers because I do not match their way of thinking. I would have been happier in my youth if I (and others) did not know what level I was at. It would have reduced the stress of needing to perform better at classwork. Just because someone has an ability does not mean that they want to use it 24/7. In some ways I wished I would have had a more normal childhood rather than to spend it wrapped up in books all of the time because it was expected of me.

It really looks like you're bragging but I am not sure that you are.
I am sure that you had many skills back then that you also sucked at. You only really mentioned science but then again there are other important skills.
The whole "gifter people" thing sickens me!
I am gifted with a good storytelling voice I am told but I am no chemistry, maths or physics gifted person.
People talk about gifts with only a focus on some expert areas.

"Is ‘gifted’ a euphemism?
Being Highly Intelligent, Giftedness As much as ‘gifted’ means good things, it also implies not so good things. The autistic savant is highly gifted in one skill or trait, but may perform well below average in other areas. "
https://suemahony.com/is-gifted-a-euphemism/


I am not trying to brag about my skills, just share what life is like thru my eyes. I would gladly give them all up if I could live a “normal” “happy” life and be accepted by my peers. I have searched for a way that it could be done. It just is not meant to be. Sometimes you do not control your own destiny, it controls you.

Oh yeah, I had many things that I sucked at (and some I still do). English and foreign languages were by far my worst subjects in school. It took a lot of effort to write fictional stories, as I think mostly with a scientific mind. I hated handwriting classes and I was caught cheating at spelling many times. It took until high school before my spelling skills developed. I completely suck at all forms of art. My sister won awards with her drawing skills, yet I could just barely draw basic things. Funny, I can mentally visualize so many cool things in my head, yet cannot draw them.

I failed my driving class in high school. I did get my driving license (at 18), but not until I practiced every day after school with my parents help. Most of my peers had been driving on their farms since they were 12 years old and had full licenses by 16. My hand/eye coordination is often generally poor, so I was not good at most sports. My social skills were years behind my peers growing up. I could go on, but I think that is enough to see that I had my problems too.



SharonB
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04 Dec 2022, 5:31 pm

I asked my ASD evaluator if it was possible to be highly intelligent and allistic and he said "yes". Bummer. :wink: My parents are highly intelligent (in the typically-measured Binet way): my mom is Autistic and my father is allistic (but neurodivergent in other ways). So for ASD it's 50/50 in my household (including myself and one sibling). Like others here, I would bet good money that Autism is a disproportionately higher percentage of obvious "achievers" just as it may be of obvious "non-speakers". We seem to fit at edges.

I am also on the bandwagon of the majority of people have their niche where they could be brilliant (even if brilliantly "mediocre"). For a person with Autism, when efforts are made to discover and/or expand on an interest ... that is goodness. It's not done often enough. Too many Autistic folks do not have creative (or o/w non-conforming) people around them, or the ability/skills/nature(?) to advocate for themselves, including myself. It's super tricky to find the right level of engagement --- not too much, not too little, just right...

I am Autistic and gifted (visual, spatial, systemization), my daughter is Autistic and gifted (visual, artistic, written), my son is allistic but neurodivergent in other ways and is gifted (spatial, tbd...). Our "2e" (twice exceptional) experience of highly asynchronous development/abilities has pros and cons. Depending on environment, sometimes the pros are more apparent and sometimes the cons are --- I see this for many folks, ASD or not, "gifted" or not. :heart:



IsabellaLinton
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04 Dec 2022, 9:17 pm

"Giftedness" in educational assessments doesn't necessarily mean high IQ. It means the person is a creative thinker, heavily right-brained, and able to solve problems out-of-the-box. People considered gifted are usually quite talented in the arts because of their right-brained orientation.

They didn't test for giftedness when I was a student. My daughter was identified gifted when she was ten, on a school assessment. I was kind of surprised to be honest because she has dyscalculia and really struggles with maths. She's poor at directions and spatial sense. She spelt her b's and d's and 9's and P's backward even at the time of being tested (age 10), which suggested dyslexia. She had undiagnosed ADHD and didn't finish many school assignments even though she loved to read and write. The school psychologists explained that Giftedness means the person is highly creative. This makes sense because she grew up to be an artist and writer.

It's fairly common for gifted people to have comorbid learning disabilities, like my daughter having dyscalculia and other forms of LD. She had an IEP after the assessment and it was partly for giftedness, partly for LD. She went to gifted classes which focused on an arts-integrated curriculum, and most of their assignments were open-ended topics because they were all out-of-the-box thinkers.



Texasmoneyman300
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04 Dec 2022, 10:20 pm

firemonkey wrote:
If so, what makes you gifted?

I have a few gifts.I am gifted at public speaking compared to some people because I have been doing it on a regular basis for most of my life.



firemonkey
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04 Dec 2022, 10:50 pm

^Having to make a public speech would freak me out.



Gammeldans
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05 Dec 2022, 5:29 am

QuantumChemist wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
QuantumChemist wrote:
My third grade class was tested. I was put into the highly to exceptionally gifted category based upon my exam scores. My reading ability was off the charts (high school graduate level), science/math advanced (high school level) and reasoning was quite developed for my age. I was tutoring high school students in math and science when I was still in elementary school. By the sixth grade, I could have skipped two levels academically in all subjects, yet my teachers attempted to hold me back because I did not fit into anything socially. All of my friends were two years younger than me, as I could relate to them better than my classmates.

Over time, I honed my different gifted skills to use at my job. I know I can mentally visualize at a level that is very advanced compared to my peers. It allows me to develop new materials and theoretically test them before I go into the lab to actually make them. When I read a scientific paper, I can easily adapt the research for a new application that is much different than the original application. Many peers have asked me how I can do it. It just occurs naturally to me. I can relate to Nicola Tesla, as he had the advanced visual skills ability also. He was much better at applying them to his work than I am able to. I would be happy if I could achieve only a tiny fraction of what he did.

As for the concept of needing a certain I.Q. range to match others with conversations, this does occur on occasions. I have found that one can make the topic less complicated to the other person in such a way that they can usually understand. Unfortunately it can be challenging as a neural divergent to tell if another person understands you. I will admit that I used to do data dumping on others when a special topic was brought up. It generally overwhelmed the other person, as they were not expecting to get that much information back at one time. I learned to release much smaller chunks of data at first to see if they could absorb the information before proceeding with more.

Being gifted is not always a positive thing. I have been ostracized by peers because I do not match their way of thinking. I would have been happier in my youth if I (and others) did not know what level I was at. It would have reduced the stress of needing to perform better at classwork. Just because someone has an ability does not mean that they want to use it 24/7. In some ways I wished I would have had a more normal childhood rather than to spend it wrapped up in books all of the time because it was expected of me.

It really looks like you're bragging but I am not sure that you are.
I am sure that you had many skills back then that you also sucked at. You only really mentioned science but then again there are other important skills.
The whole "gifter people" thing sickens me!
I am gifted with a good storytelling voice I am told but I am no chemistry, maths or physics gifted person.
People talk about gifts with only a focus on some expert areas.

"Is ‘gifted’ a euphemism?
Being Highly Intelligent, Giftedness As much as ‘gifted’ means good things, it also implies not so good things. The autistic savant is highly gifted in one skill or trait, but may perform well below average in other areas. "
https://suemahony.com/is-gifted-a-euphemism/


I am not trying to brag about my skills, just share what life is like thru my eyes. I would gladly give them all up if I could live a “normal” “happy” life and be accepted by my peers. I have searched for a way that it could be done. It just is not meant to be. Sometimes you do not control your own destiny, it controls you.

Oh yeah, I had many things that I sucked at (and some I still do). English and foreign languages were by far my worst subjects in school. It took a lot of effort to write fictional stories, as I think mostly with a scientific mind. I hated handwriting classes and I was caught cheating at spelling many times. It took until high school before my spelling skills developed. I completely suck at all forms of art. My sister won awards with her drawing skills, yet I could just barely draw basic things. Funny, I can mentally visualize so many cool things in my head, yet cannot draw them.

I failed my driving class in high school. I did get my driving license (at 18), but not until I practiced every day after school with my parents help. Most of my peers had been driving on their farms since they were 12 years old and had full licenses by 16. My hand/eye coordination is often generally poor, so I was not good at most sports. My social skills were years behind my peers growing up. I could go on, but I think that is enough to see that I had my problems too.

It is good that you are not bragging. It is also very good that you know what you excell at and what you struggle with.

What does "full licenses by 16" refer to? Don't you have to be 18 in order to drive a car on public roads?



Gammeldans
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05 Dec 2022, 5:42 am

So we're talking about giftedness.
How do we define it in this thread? Can we even define it? The person driving the Fredex or DHL truck and doing it really well won't be called gifted by most although I think he or she is gifted.

Will I ever be called gifted by people who call themselves gifted? Not really, although I am told that I have a very good srorytelling voice. I would call that a gift.

So what does being gifted even refer to?
Qnd what kind of expertise or skills can we accept as being a part of giftedness?
And qt what age did we have to see this skill in order for ot to be counted as a gift?



QuantumChemist
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05 Dec 2022, 8:54 am

Gammeldans wrote:
QuantumChemist wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
QuantumChemist wrote:
My third grade class was tested. I was put into the highly to exceptionally gifted category based upon my exam scores. My reading ability was off the charts (high school graduate level), science/math advanced (high school level) and reasoning was quite developed for my age. I was tutoring high school students in math and science when I was still in elementary school. By the sixth grade, I could have skipped two levels academically in all subjects, yet my teachers attempted to hold me back because I did not fit into anything socially. All of my friends were two years younger than me, as I could relate to them better than my classmates.

Over time, I honed my different gifted skills to use at my job. I know I can mentally visualize at a level that is very advanced compared to my peers. It allows me to develop new materials and theoretically test them before I go into the lab to actually make them. When I read a scientific paper, I can easily adapt the research for a new application that is much different than the original application. Many peers have asked me how I can do it. It just occurs naturally to me. I can relate to Nicola Tesla, as he had the advanced visual skills ability also. He was much better at applying them to his work than I am able to. I would be happy if I could achieve only a tiny fraction of what he did.

As for the concept of needing a certain I.Q. range to match others with conversations, this does occur on occasions. I have found that one can make the topic less complicated to the other person in such a way that they can usually understand. Unfortunately it can be challenging as a neural divergent to tell if another person understands you. I will admit that I used to do data dumping on others when a special topic was brought up. It generally overwhelmed the other person, as they were not expecting to get that much information back at one time. I learned to release much smaller chunks of data at first to see if they could absorb the information before proceeding with more.

Being gifted is not always a positive thing. I have been ostracized by peers because I do not match their way of thinking. I would have been happier in my youth if I (and others) did not know what level I was at. It would have reduced the stress of needing to perform better at classwork. Just because someone has an ability does not mean that they want to use it 24/7. In some ways I wished I would have had a more normal childhood rather than to spend it wrapped up in books all of the time because it was expected of me.

It really looks like you're bragging but I am not sure that you are.
I am sure that you had many skills back then that you also sucked at. You only really mentioned science but then again there are other important skills.
The whole "gifter people" thing sickens me!
I am gifted with a good storytelling voice I am told but I am no chemistry, maths or physics gifted person.
People talk about gifts with only a focus on some expert areas.

"Is ‘gifted’ a euphemism?
Being Highly Intelligent, Giftedness As much as ‘gifted’ means good things, it also implies not so good things. The autistic savant is highly gifted in one skill or trait, but may perform well below average in other areas. "
https://suemahony.com/is-gifted-a-euphemism/


I am not trying to brag about my skills, just share what life is like thru my eyes. I would gladly give them all up if I could live a “normal” “happy” life and be accepted by my peers. I have searched for a way that it could be done. It just is not meant to be. Sometimes you do not control your own destiny, it controls you.

Oh yeah, I had many things that I sucked at (and some I still do). English and foreign languages were by far my worst subjects in school. It took a lot of effort to write fictional stories, as I think mostly with a scientific mind. I hated handwriting classes and I was caught cheating at spelling many times. It took until high school before my spelling skills developed. I completely suck at all forms of art. My sister won awards with her drawing skills, yet I could just barely draw basic things. Funny, I can mentally visualize so many cool things in my head, yet cannot draw them.

I failed my driving class in high school. I did get my driving license (at 18), but not until I practiced every day after school with my parents help. Most of my peers had been driving on their farms since they were 12 years old and had full licenses by 16. My hand/eye coordination is often generally poor, so I was not good at most sports. My social skills were years behind my peers growing up. I could go on, but I think that is enough to see that I had my problems too.

It is good that you are not bragging. It is also very good that you know what you excell at and what you struggle with.

What does "full licenses by 16" refer to? Don't you have to be 18 in order to drive a car on public roads?


In my home state, you can get a restricted driver’s license before 16. It allows you to be able to drive under certain conditions. You can drive back and forth from school. You are limited on how many non-adult passengers can be in the car with you. You are restricted to only drive during the day time hours. It does allow you to drive with a parent after hours with a specific reason, like practicing nighttime driving or rushing someone to the hospital.

A full driver’s license is a normal one without those restrictions. Back in the time I grew up, high school students would often cruise around in their cars/trucks without a particular destination in mind. It was common to drag main a few times each weekend night. That trend seems to have died out when gas became expensive over the past few decades.



Joe90
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05 Dec 2022, 9:40 am

No. I'm AS and dumb.


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QuantumChemist
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05 Dec 2022, 9:55 am

Gammeldans wrote:
So we're talking about giftedness.
How do we define it in this thread? Can we even define it? The person driving the Fredex or DHL truck and doing it really well won't be called gifted by most although I think he or she is gifted.

Will I ever be called gifted by people who call themselves gifted? Not really, although I am told that I have a very good srorytelling voice. I would call that a gift.

So what does being gifted even refer to?
Qnd what kind of expertise or skills can we accept as being a part of giftedness?
And qt what age did we have to see this skill in order for ot to be counted as a gift?


It is an advanced set of measurable skills in an area that sets the individual apart from an average taken of those skills by a majority of individuals. I have both cognitive skills and creative skills in my gifted abilities. If you want a clearer definition, go to this website.

https://www.nagc.org/resources-publicat ... giftedness



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05 Dec 2022, 9:59 am

Yes. It occurred from a brain injury when I was around 3 years old. Normally the left side of the brain is dominant and the right side of the brain lives in our REM and NREM sleep state. But because my left side was damaged and died at around 3, the two sides of my brain switched places so that my body would survive. It is basically a BRAIN FLIP. As a result, I rely on a much higher degree of accuracy in reaching decisions. Nothing is sacred and everything needs to be tested to measure its worth.


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05 Dec 2022, 10:13 am

jimmy_m

I find that so interesting. My big stroke was in the cerebellum (middle back, by the brain stem). Cerebellums don’t affect the opposite side of the body since they don’t have an opposite side, but mine was slightly on the left of the cerebellum and my left side was more profoundly affected including my eye and my hand. Doctors didn’t seem to know that the same side is affected in cerebellar strokes so they saw me like a Guinea pig.

Cerebellums affect our ability to fine-tune anything including emotions or nuance, and they can’t heal either because they’re so smart there are no other neurons that can do the job.

I’ve changed a lot since my stroke. I feel much more chill in some ways and more black / white in others. I had emotional lability too from Pseudo Bulbar but I think it’s going away. The second stroke made me lose mental stamina.

Just sending my best wishes for your recovery again!



kraftiekortie
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05 Dec 2022, 11:02 am

I admire all you folks who have survived through major upheavals in their lives.

It takes "genius" to do that.

Being "gifted" in survival.



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05 Dec 2022, 1:03 pm

It didn't take genius in my case. It took a year of rehab for PT, OT, Speech, and Vestibular therapy. I guess you could say it took perseverance but I didn't have any other option. I had a fair number of screaming meltdowns with my therapists and they likely thought I was a whack job. That's because they were trying to make me act / be Neurotypical in recovery, and they didn't believe I never had those skills to begin with.