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firemonkey
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15 Oct 2022, 7:17 am

My daughter took me in the wheelchair to have my flu jab. The bloke who was going to give the jab talked to me as though I was several sandwiches short of a picnic. I think it was the combo of the wheelchair and the autism lanyard round my neck. I think that in a wheelchair= must be a bit simple minded is not uncommon. I didn't say anything. It wasn't a suitable time to do so. Given how busy they were.



DanielW
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15 Oct 2022, 7:19 am

That's exactly why I don't use the lanyard - it causes more problems than it helps with.



firemonkey
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15 Oct 2022, 7:51 am

It has my flat keys and other keys on it. I'd expect a member of the general public to respond in that way, far more than a trained health professional.



DanielW
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15 Oct 2022, 9:14 am

Medical Dr's get an average of 30 minutes of training on ASD. That coupled with the fact that they typically only see/treat children with autism, they are less familiar than you might think.

A wheelchair doesn't phase them as much (they see them everyday, but how many adults with the ASD/Hidden disabilities lanyards do they see do you think? I would guess not many. While no one should condescend to anyone, I imagine most lanyard wearers that they interact with do have at least some degree of intellectual impairment.



firemonkey
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15 Oct 2022, 10:34 am

I don't hide the fact I struggle with some things. I maybe have some mannerisms that make me look as though I'm stupid.


At the same time I score higher than these people on the World genius directory

Dr Eick Sternhagen Fields of education: Economy, Latin, ev. theology, Doctorate in Latin of late Middle Ages, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster – WWU, University of Münster, Germany.

Dr Manahel Thabet The youngest – and only – Arab with a PhD in Financial Engineering, she writes research papers on quantum mathematics. Her work to revolutionize our understanding of math and physics is poised to earn her a second PhD, at the age of 32.

Dr Donato Stolfa Nutritionist Biologist Specialized in Human Nutrition

Dr Jeremy Saget Weightless Flight Surgeon
ZeroG Instructor
United Nations rotary wing Aeromedical Evacuations Flight Surgeon

Dr Bishoy Goubran Bishoy Goubran, MD. Is a clinical researcher in the field of Behavioral and Cardiovascular medicine. Bishoy’s research line is in psychosomatic medicine

Dr Daniel Piersee Doctor of Pharmacy in Pharmacy @ University of Iowa

Dr Jawdat Wehbe Cardiologist - electrophysiologist · Heart and vessels


Dr Edwin P. Christmann, professor and chair of the secondary education department and graduate coordinator of Slippery Rock University’s mathematics and science teaching program, earned his Ph.D. at Old Dominion University.



DanielW
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15 Oct 2022, 11:49 am

I understand that, because people always (without exception) get the wrong first impression about me. My body language and facial expressions lead people to think something completely different than who I am. It isn't until they get a chance to converse with me in a longer format that that begin to understand. That doesn't usually happen in a clinical/medical situation when the amount of direct interaction and time are so short.

As an aside, My IQ is fairly high. I'd be great at math, but I'm also dyslexic, so I am great at theory and concepts but terrible writing/solving equations.



firemonkey
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15 Oct 2022, 7:15 pm

I was absolutely awful at geometry.



Jakki
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15 Oct 2022, 7:30 pm

Interesting how many people , have little or no clue about Autistic people . Even so called professionals .
Those persons cause me some degree of disillusionment about many people in the medical field. :roll:


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Urselius
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17 Oct 2022, 11:35 am

DanielW wrote:
That's exactly why I don't use the lanyard - it causes more problems than it helps with.


It is useful in some airports, I had mine and was fast-tracked through airport security. Judging the length of the queue I saved a good half-hour of standing in a crowded hall - crowds are a big sensory problem for me.


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czarsmom
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27 Oct 2022, 7:26 am

I used to be more free and easy about telling people about my ASD diagnosis. However several of these people used it against me. So now I’m very very careful who I tell. There are a lot of people with ill intentions in this world these days.


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DanielW
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27 Oct 2022, 10:27 am

Urselius wrote:
DanielW wrote:
That's exactly why I don't use the lanyard - it causes more problems than it helps with.


It is useful in some airports, I had mine and was fast-tracked through airport security. Judging the length of the queue I saved a good half-hour of standing in a crowded hall - crowds are a big sensory problem for me.


Not really, you can get priority boarding from the ticket agent or at the gate, no lanyard needed.



blitzkrieg
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03 Nov 2022, 10:51 pm

czarsmom wrote:
I used to be more free and easy about telling people about my ASD diagnosis. However several of these people used it against me. So now I’m very very careful who I tell. There are a lot of people with ill intentions in this world these days.


I kind of regret having told certain people about the ASD diagnosis, too.



techstepgenr8tion
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31 Dec 2022, 2:05 pm

Despite tales of everyone else having superior empathy to us, I see it time and time again that no one really matters to anyone who doesn't know them. It's partially self-absorption, partly simple indifference, and with medical professionals they don't have a lot left over once they've filled all of their metrics.

I'd agree with the sentiment that if people can't instantaneously tell that something's different about you that anything you offer them up front will usually just distort the interaction.

I really think the only way we could avoid this is have a less hypercompetitive society where people actually have leftover bandwidth to deal with these kinds of intricacies appropriately but, as far as I can tell, Darwinian evolution itself seems to force hypercompetitive behavior (whoever doesn't get hypercompetitive loses to whoever does) and so it's a constant multipolar trap that very few people can do much about aside from stepping out of the rat race because they've become independently wealthy or whatever else.


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14 Jan 2023, 12:05 am

I would just take the shot…..and move on.

Sure, I frequently get irritated by condescension myself. I understand Firemonkey’s irritation.

But I would also know that I’m not seeing that person again.



nick007
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27 Jan 2023, 6:24 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I would just take the shot…..and move on.

Sure, I frequently get irritated by condescension myself. I understand Firemonkey’s irritation.

But I would also know that I’m not seeing that person again.
I would do the same. I've gotten a lot of condescension when I was a kid & teen & in my early 20s & the people didn't know I had autism. I'm used to people not caring to listen to what I say or not trying to process & consider what I do say. If someone is being rude or short with me, I just kinda sigh & roll my eyes & then try & move on. The phrase "Pick your battles" comes to mind here. I eventually learned that it's not worth fighting/arguing about it cuz they likely won't take me seriously anyway & then I'd be more upset. I'll save the arguing for when I feel I'm getting shafted, screwed over, or majorly backed into a corner so to speak.


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Texasmoneyman300
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27 Jan 2023, 5:33 pm

firemonkey wrote:
My daughter took me in the wheelchair to have my flu jab. The bloke who was going to give the jab talked to me as though I was several sandwiches short of a picnic. I think it was the combo of the wheelchair and the autism lanyard round my neck. I think that in a wheelchair= must be a bit simple minded is not uncommon. I didn't say anything. It wasn't a suitable time to do so. Given how busy they were.

I get condescension from my family a lot