Asperger's and sports; Athletic aspies?

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ASPartOfMe
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21 Nov 2017, 7:13 pm

Anthony Ianni - Basketball Player and Anti-Bullying Advocate
CBS News

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Anthony Ianni diagnosed with Pervasive Development Disorder (PDD), an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), at age 4, is the first-ever person with ASD to play in Division I college basketball, suiting up for the Michigan State Spartans.

When he was a child, doctors told Ianni's parents he would barely graduate high school and college wasn't a possibility. They said he would likely end up living in a group home.

The boy, who was also told he would never be an athlete, eventually won two Big Ten Championships, a Big Ten Tournament Title, and received the 2012 Unsung Player Award.

Since graduating from college with a degree in sociology, he's worked with the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, is a anti-bullying motivational speaker, and started a family.


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“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


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07 Dec 2017, 5:52 pm

i go to Taekwondo every Friday . i'm good at it, so far i'm 9th Kup (white belt yellow tag) and i am hoping early 2018 to take my grading for 8th kup (yellow belt) :) :D



ASPartOfMe
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27 Jan 2018, 1:13 pm

Tucker Kruse enjoys big night on the ice

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he first goal came from Isaac Baron in the corner, a horizontal line-drive to Tucker Kruse’s stick. All he had to do was tap it straight into the net while the puck was in full acceleration.

It was the third of 13 goals scored by the North Iowa Bulls Saturday, Jan. 20, against Wausau, but the first of two for Kruse, and it was a big deal.

The 5-foot-4 Woodbury, Minnesota native raised his fist in the air as his teammates engulfed him on the ice. It’s a classic hockey celebration, but for him, it was a well-deserved moment.

“He’s the very hardest working player we have every single day,” head coach Todd Sanden said. “There’s no middle ground for him so everything it is what it is, he gives every bit of effort he has.”

Kruse has Asperger syndrome, a form of autism, but there’s no limitations. Not even his height plays a factor as he speeds past others on the ice.

People with Asperger's tend to find special passions in one topic or activity, something they can become experts in. That could be the case for Kruse, who looks at the game with logical humility.

“First goal my line-mate did all the work, so I just had to put it in the net,” Kruse said.

“I try to model my game after Zach Parise, for sure, of the Minnesota Wild,” Kruse said. “He’s a hard-working player and I try to model my game after him, he never quits on anything.”

The dedication Kruse has on the ice translates outside the ice, his teammates love to be around him. They love to see his hard work paying off.

“Tuck, he’s a great kid, I love him ... he’s pretty funny, he likes to mess around with me and I like to mess around with him back,” Connor Clemons said.


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“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


Aristophanes
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27 Jan 2018, 1:28 pm

I was decent at soccer until I was 15 and decided I didn't like doing it anymore (parental pressure to play in the first place). I played street hockey (no ice in the desert) and was a decent goalie. I had a habit of picking out pucks stick side with the knob of the stick (Dominik Hasek style). That ability was noted by all the people I played with, but I doubt that had anything to do with autism. Supposedly body control is something autistic people are poor at, but I had no problems, mostly my problems were with vision since there was so much going on it was hard to concentrate on a single movement on the field.



Pincushion
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27 Jan 2018, 4:04 pm

If anyone wants some fitness inspiration being an aspie, then I guess I could use myself as a good example.

I went from being a "skinny-fat" kid who couldn't do PE at school type, until age 18 or so and then decided to get into Health, Fitness, Bodybuilding etc and Now 5+ years later I weigh more now with a 30" waist than I did with a 37"+ waist.

On average I'm working out about 7-8 Hours+ a week. (probably more than needed admittedly)

Sports though... well... not my strong point! unless you count getting excited at breaking a deadlift PR as sport. Or airsoft at one point.



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26 Sep 2019, 3:05 am

An autistic golfer and a Native American named Jamozzy help put a spotlight on The First Tee at Pebble Beach

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Meet Evan Koutsopetras, 15, from Brooklyn. He was diagnosed with autism at age 3, did not start talking until six months later, was was told by a private high school that as a special-needs student his IQ was not high enough to compete academically.

Today, Koutsopetras is a junior and plays No. 1 on the golf team at Fort Hamilton High, the second largest high school in New York City, with nearly 5,000 students. He is an honor student, an Eagle Scout, and on Friday will be one of 78 First Tee participants from across the country playing alongside members of the PGA Tour Champions in the PURE Insurance Championship at Pebble Beach.

“He would not have been exposed to typical kids,” his father, George, said, addressing the role golf and The First Tee played in his development. “Golf above any other sport affords the opportunity to learn and exhibit really good mannerisms and behaviors. The First Tee was really critical, because they have the nine core values. They were teaching life skills, how to greet people, how to interact.”


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“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


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26 Sep 2019, 4:10 am

I'm into cycling and have cycled around 4,500 miles so far this year. Last night I was looking at a calendar of cycling events and I might just sign up for an organised ride next weekend. The rides are long distance, between 100 and 600 km and self supported, basically you get a map and a little book to collect a few stamps at the control points. The social aspect is difficult for me but at some point during the day I will probably end up sitting in a cafe talking with other cyclists. 8O
These events tend to attract a good mix of people though, they are very cheap to enter and non competitive, the emphasis is on completing the course rather than racing, times are not published. I think that my aspieness might help with the endurance aspect of these rides in that I have quite a high pain threshold. If anyone is interested, the organisation behind these events is called Audax.



shortfatbalduglyman
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26 Sep 2019, 10:04 am

Granted I am bad at sports. Individual and team sports. And clumsy in coordination.

But the psychiatrist that diagnosed me with Asperger's (San Diego 2003) did not ask any questions about sports or anything like that

Nor did he tell me to ride a unicycle


Sports are socially awkward

Lil dipshits act manipulative, judgmental, arrogant and entitled.

Furthermore I am physically weak and slow

Counselor had the nerve to put "motor retardation" on the insurance form
:twisted: :roll:

But the only time she saw me move was from the waiting room to the couch

She did not measure three minutes with a stopwatch


f**k Jeanne Courtney b***h



LKL wrote:
Woohoo! I've been out of training for a year (aikido) due to a back injury, so I both sympathize and rejoice with you.




For over eleven years, and five hundred lessons (multiplication, not counted), I have taken aikido.


Over and over, instructors ask if it's my first time



An instructor had the nerve to ask me if I knew what a ninety degree angle was and if I had a high school diploma


He found that I was so bad at aikido that I must be intellectually challenged

He told me that, in 2008 and it is now 2019 and every day I have preoccupied with his statement :jester:



Theory of multiple intelligence



Yes, he didn't do anything illegal and if he were to have done something illegal, it would take a lot of time, money and energy to, compete with. "Might makes right". "Beggars can't be choosers". :evil: Monopolistic competition :twisted:


Plenty of precious lil "people" told me that I was "smart" or "stupid"


Freedom of speech (fine)


But Warren's statement is emotionally disturbing, because, he spent a lot more time with me "teaching" aikido. And a lot of it was one on one ratio :roll: :jester:



Second of all he's a structural engineer and I flunked structural engineering 4th year

Age 21

Now I am 36 and have obsessed over it every single day and counting



:mrgreen:



EmmxG
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19 Oct 2021, 1:47 am

Hello,
I just found out your article as I was searching for more information on how to reconcile having potentially an Asperger syndrom and some specific problems with sports. I can relate to your "hyper focus" description as playing tennis yesterday I found I could hit the ball well only when I was concentrated in an intuitive sort of way, not watching my moves analytically. Yet one thing which has given me troubles all my life are tennis serves. I can't throw the ball properly, and if I do I can't hit it properly most of the time. I've resorted to do my second serve from below. I did tennis tournaments this way. Did this happen to any of you?
Emm



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30 Oct 2021, 11:30 am

From the Parkinson chat show on BBC TV, circa 1978-79:

Michael Parkinson: "When were you at your fittest, Peter?"

Peter Cook: "Er....date of birth".

I sometimes feel that applies to me as well.


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