Are people more accepting of health problems now?

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KitLily
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05 Aug 2022, 3:10 pm

I've noticed that people are more accepting of health problems since the pandemic, even mental health.

If I say that my husband had a mental breakdown last year and I've been having mental health problems recently, people just tend to say, 'yes of course', and ask how we are. And when people ask, 'how are you?' they really mean it these days.

Pre pandemic if I said we'd had mental health problems, people would be shocked and disapproving. And no one really asked how we were, or if they did, they didn't really care.

I suppose that is one benefit of the pandemic.


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CockneyRebel
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20 Aug 2022, 9:42 pm

Kindness has come back in vogue over the past two years over the pandemic and people have become more accepting of such things. It's almost like a slight return of the Hippie Days when everybody cared.


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shortfatbalduglyman
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20 Aug 2022, 9:50 pm

I have not noticed that sort of change

But I don't live in the same country as your post says you do

Not a representative sample



KitLily
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21 Aug 2022, 5:17 am

CockneyRebel wrote:
Kindness has come back in vogue over the past two years over the pandemic and people have become more accepting of such things. It's almost like a slight return of the Hippie Days when everybody cared.


Yes, I've really noticed that when people ask how I am, they wait anxiously for the answer and are relieved when I say I'm well. And I do the same.

I told my very nice local councillor when I met her in a shop recently that my husband had been ill and she was genuinely concerned.


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KitLily
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21 Aug 2022, 5:18 am

shortfatbalduglyman wrote:
I have not noticed that sort of change

But I don't live in the same country as your post says you do

Not a representative sample


Well obviously I can't speak for a country I don't live in, and this is just what I've noticed, not a scientific, measured study! It's a conversation.


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babybird
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22 Aug 2022, 7:05 am

KitLily wrote:
I've noticed that people are more accepting of health problems since the pandemic, even mental health.

If I say that my husband had a mental breakdown last year and I've been having mental health problems recently, people just tend to say, 'yes of course', and ask how we are. And when people ask, 'how are you?' they really mean it these days.

Pre pandemic if I said we'd had mental health problems, people would be shocked and disapproving. And no one really asked how we were, or if they did, they didn't really care.

I suppose that is one benefit of the pandemic.


I very rarely discuss my health with people offline. Simply because people usually like to disclose about themselves with me so I just let them talk about themselves and don't tell them about me. So with that I've not really noticed any difference.


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KitLily
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22 Aug 2022, 7:35 am

babybird wrote:
I very rarely discuss my health with people offline. Simply because people usually like to disclose about themselves with me so I just let them talk about themselves and don't tell them about me. So with that I've not really noticed any difference.


I suppose it depends on the sort of environment we live in and whether people are nice or not.


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