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Edna3362
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09 Jan 2022, 7:20 am

I think it doesn't always have to do with love or lack of thereof.
At least in suicide cases, it's not necessarily always about depression and/or less welcoming circumstances.

It doesn't always have to happen out of irrational thoughts from depression and suicidal thoughts.

I think it's more to do with intolerance, if, sometimes, love couldn't take that intolerance in life away.

More so if there's also no sanctuary in said intolerance -- some are just impossible situations in a person's mind, depression or not.

That intolerance is very much leading to depression though. And depression just enforces that.
Helplessness from escaping from whatever one cannot stand from.


It's mostly just about wanting to leave their current life.
Some people are too attached to the past, always thinking in what ifs, in guilt or shame or fear.

It doesn't always have anything to do with their past, their achievements, their present nor the security of their futures.
Some people are just sick of life -- burnout of life so to speak, thus refusing to try or make something new, maybe out of impatience and just wanting to "leave".


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lvpin
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16 Jan 2022, 8:32 pm

noisserped wrote:
I just heard a father saying his daughter did this... which makes me wonder, if they were truly 'loved', then what should an unloved person do, kill themselves a hundred times over? I decided to keep living, and years later I live alone, rarely talking to anyone... with cat poop as a foundation of my flat. So, eh, not sure not dying is entirely rational sometimes, but...


I think they say this because they expect that if someone is loved they should feel it and that would change their choice. In actuality in that mindset you feel so revolting that people 'loving you' makes little difference. No one is saying that unloved people should off themselves.



AprilR
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17 Jan 2022, 7:59 am

Because other people's love don't feel real, and they feel like they are undeserving of love.
Maybe they hate themselves too much to be able to accept that love.



Canadian1911
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21 Jan 2022, 9:27 pm

What other's have said here holds a lot of water, as to why a "loved" person might kill themselves.

However I do have a controversial opinion that in some rare cases suicide is justified. Not everyone has a loving family, or other support unfortunately, and life is indeed very hard and the world can be uncaring. If some gets into a position where they are essentially f***ed for life, then yes suicide is justified, imo.



AprilR
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22 Jan 2022, 2:32 pm

Canadian1911 wrote:
What other's have said here holds a lot of water, as to why a "loved" person might kill themselves.

However I do have a controversial opinion that in some rare cases suicide is justified. Not everyone has a loving family, or other support unfortunately, and life is indeed very hard and the world can be uncaring. If some gets into a position where they are essentially f***ed for life, then yes suicide is justified, imo.


I agree with this.



babybird
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06 Feb 2022, 2:16 pm

I just think people must be so desperate and without hope when they get to the point of ending their lives. It's very very sad.



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06 Feb 2022, 4:34 pm

MrsPeel wrote:
Fnord wrote:
. . . let us leave the recovery process to the appropriately-trained and licensed mental-health professionals, shall we?
Oh that's a bit harsh, Fnord. . . If they are posting here about their issues it would seem to indicate that professional support is inadequate or failing them, so it seems unfeeling to brush them off with the "go see a professional" line. I mean, yes, they ought to go see a professional and we can point that out, but surely it's best to do so without making them feel unheard and unsupported here too. . .
Harsh, but true.  No one here seems to be qualified to engage in psychoanalysis or "talk therapy" with a clinically-depressed person; and if they are, the process would necessarily involve face-to-face interaction in private (not remote interaction on a public website).  I stand by my original statement because the very nature of social websites limits the efficacy of personal interactions.