Competing against taller guys?

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Would
No many women might prefer men who are 5ft10/5ft11 22%  22%  [ 2 ]
Yes some women would refuse to date a man under 6ft 22%  22%  [ 2 ]
Women don’t care either way 56%  56%  [ 5 ]
Total votes : 9

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05 Jan 2022, 9:45 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Depends which guy is a bigger jerk. If either.

This

If they are carbon copies of each other, flip a coin. Whether I'm looking him in the face or looking up doesn't matter much

Superficial women would prefer the taller one probably. But why should anyone care what they think?


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GadgetGuru
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06 Jan 2022, 12:35 am

Jamesy wrote:
Would men who are 5ft10 or 5ft11 face height prejudice/discrimination from women when competing against taller guys like 6ft-6ft5 range?

Just remember that tall guys can be as unsure of themselves as you seem to be. A woman may well note such a lack of self-esteem even more than whether your head nearly bumps into door frames, as mine does.

It may seem like the worst of cliched advice, but learning to at least project an air of contentment with one's physical form is advice that does hold up to scrutiny. Consider this "masking", if you must, but NTs do it, as well, and whether that projection of confidence is innate or learned makes little difference to the viewer.

I've found myself to be self-conscious of being "outside of the norm" in many ways, and have noted that the more I dwell on this, the more I lose my ability to be compelling and interesting. It is during those times when I note that I have not been "looking at myself" during a conversation with strangers that I believe I am most likely to be seen as at ease with myself and others.

Obviously, if keeping up such a display occupies a significant amount of your mental energy, it's not sustainable in the long term, and will inevitably lead to failure. My only solution to this dilemma is to find ways to gradually let the mask slip off after the initial good impression has been made, in cases where a long-term state of amity is desired. If your potential mate can not deal with the real you, or at least a sustainably "polished" version of you, then it's best to find this out as soon as is practical.

Darron


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