Anyone else love the punk rock subculture?

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punkguy378
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24 Jun 2013, 12:18 am

I have never really come across any other Aspie who is into the punk subculture: wears the clothes, listens to the music, and follows some of the ideas of it as a movement. I am surprised at how many people think punk and think Green Day, Blink 182 or any other pop-punk band. It just shows that many people do not really even know what it means to be punk.

Quite simply punk is mainly about the music and the feelings you have. At its core is a desire to be different and not conform to many of the social rules. As an aspie I also feel that my difference is equated with being different and not conforming to social rules.

Anyways, would love to know any aspie who is involved with the punk subculture in any way. It seems most of the punk types I know are NTs but sometimes it is hard to tell really.

I feel this belongs in here as punk is mainly seen as a musical genre but it is actually so much more than that.



redrobin62
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24 Jun 2013, 1:32 am

I used to be a DJ at radio station KPGY-FM in Ames, IA at Iowa State Univ. They called me the Punk Lord back then. I played the Sex Pistols, the Clash, Lena Lovich, the Damned, the Boomtown Rats, Husker Du, the Plasmatics, the Exploited, Bauhaus, Joy Division, etc. Those were fun times - ripped jeans, leather jacket adorned with pins like The Jam and 2 Tone, mohawks, etc. Oh, yes. The good 'ol days.



punkguy378
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24 Jun 2013, 5:49 am

Yes they are the good old days.

I was actually in a local band myself for about a year. Nothing fancy and no actual professional recordings. Mostly for fun actually. I knew someone who did a punk radio show at URI. Plus my band played at some gig at URI. Interesting that punk seems to happen on colleges everywhere.

I wish I was more involved like I used to be. I actually tried to create my own zine (I am sure people know what that is a fanzine? sort of like a Do-it-yourself Magazine and you give away at record stores for free or whatever). My only interview was with Anti-Flag from Pittsburgh. And Alternative Tentacles told me to shove off when I asked for demo discs. Jerks! Jello Biafra is a jerk! Well I think he pretty much owns AT. I had music reviews in there too after I got free demos from different labels.

I am literally into the entire underground of punk. Stuff people have never heard of. Well more people know about it these days. But still I started back in the 90s when if you looked punk you could not get a date! Literally.

It was also so conservative around RI so I always hated that. Ohio must have been just as bad. I would assume so. I was from Wisconsin and they were pretty dang conservative. Just plain boring there.



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24 Jun 2013, 1:15 pm

Sadly, Punk Culture has been pretty much dying since the early 90's, but yeah, it was a great thing when it was alive and kicking.--Now it's just another thing that you buy at the mall.


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24 Jun 2013, 2:06 pm

I think punk was more an attitude than anything else. It was an explosion of extreme rebellion against the established principles in the mainstream.

Sadly, after that initial burst in the 70's it was absorbed into popular culture and became just another genre of pop music.

If you want to see very early punk watch a film called Pink Flamingos by John Waters. I reckon that's where Malcolm McClaren got his inspiration.



Bun
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24 Jun 2013, 5:25 pm

Me, definitely. And you're not alone in not getting the 'Blink 182'-type groups, it's really quite different from what I like.



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26 Jun 2013, 8:52 am

THIS (click) goes here...

Quote:
Punk Voyager
By Shaenon K. Garrity

Punk Voyager was built by punks. They made it from beer cans, razors, safety pins, and a surfboard some D-bag had left on the beach. Also plutonium. Where did they get plutonium? Around. f*** you.

The punks who built Punk Voyager were Johnny Bonesaw, Johnny Razor, Mexican Johnny D-bag, Red Viscera, and some other guys. No, as*hole, nobody remembers what other guys. They were f***ing wasted, these punks. They’d been drinking on the San Diego beach all day and night, talking about making a run to Tijuana and then forgetting and punching each other. They’d built a fire on the beach, and all night the fire went up and went down while the punks threw beer cans at the seagulls.

Forget the s*** I just said, it wasn’t the punks who did it. They were f***ing punks. The hell they know about astro-engineering? Truth is that Punk Voyager was the strung-out masterpiece of Mexican Johnny D-bag’s girlfriend, Lacuna, who had a doctorate in structural engineering. Before she burned out and ran for the coast, Lacuna was named Alice McGuire and built secret nuclear submarines for a government contractor in Ohio. It sucked. But that was where she got the skills to construct an unmanned deep-space probe. Same principle, right? Keep the radiation in and the water out. Or the vacuum of space, whatever, it’s all the same s*** to an engineer....


- See more at: http://escapepod.org/2013/01/24/ep380-p ... xHn1q.dpuf


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26 Jun 2013, 9:15 am

I was when I was younger, but I dont think you will know any bands I listened, most of them were singing german. I liked the people, so most of them didnt push you away or made you feel like "being else", you simply felt normal among them. (Looking "non-normal" around punks is pretty hard. ^^) I cant tell why, so I am wearing normal cloths now and also dont have any colourful hairstyle any longer and wear now band-shirts of metalgroups, but when I am around the capital city, I still seem to have some connection to punks. You sit in the tube, a group joins and 30 seconds afterwards you are already joking together, dont know, maybe I do instinctively smile when I see them or whatever. My partner had some issues with me having so easily contact with that people, he also had his kind of rebellious issues but he is form a conservative, wealthy family, so to rebell among them, wearing an earring or having one small little tattoo already was sufficient. XD But I think he knows now, that I avoid the aggressive type of punks myself. I fully support stuff like that empty houses should be used by homeless and political ideas, but there is no need to attack cars on purpose and such nonsense as it is happening in germany during the "Chaos-days". Moving in empty houses and using and renewing them as living room is a message to people. Drinking, puking and setting cars on fire, is not.



punkguy378
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27 Jun 2013, 11:05 am

Robdemanc wrote:
I think punk was more an attitude than anything else. It was an explosion of extreme rebellion against the established principles in the mainstream.

Sadly, after that initial burst in the 70's it was absorbed into popular culture and became just another genre of pop music.

If you want to see very early punk watch a film called Pink Flamingos by John Waters. I reckon that's where Malcolm McClaren got his inspiration.


hmm. what about streetpunk or Oi! are you familiar with those. They are still around. I mean it has been taken by popular culture in some ways but I would never associate the stuff I listen to with pop music unless you mean "pop punk" which honestly is not really punk at all. It is too poppy and MTV friendly. Most of the newer bands from the late nineties until now are more akin to the punk music in Britain in the eighties the so called 2nd wave of British punk. Synonymous with American Hardcore punk. Also called "UK 82". This is mainly where modern Street punk comes from and also many of the new bands are part of the Oi! movement started at the same time as second wave british punk.

Yes quite a bit has changed since the late seventies. Honestly I am totally into most of the bands from the late seventies in England and America. The Boys, Sham 69, The Maniacs (from England), Johnny Thunders (basically "junkie" rock and somewhat proto-punk), Cock Sparrer, even bands like Discharge or the Varukers which ended up part of the second wave of British punk. None of the bands in the eighties were really pop music in any way pretty abrasive and violent. I think punk has gotten more dark and violent especially after the seventies. Adding a more sharp edge to the music in the eighties and speeding it up I would say probably due to their fascination with speed metal and Motorhead.

Although this is honestly up to debate and interpretation and opinion.

I have been following punk since the late 90s and honestly the scene is somewhat similar now to what it was in the late 90s.

Honestly in the words of The Exploited "Punks Not Dead" and this came out in the eighties. Punk went through a metamorphosis where some of the late seventies bands called it quits because it was not what they thought punk should be. Punk will always be a counter-culture and changes based on the times. The eighties were a time of protest against the Maggie Thatcher regime and their quest for land acquisition in the now infamous Falklands war involving the SAS among other events. Bands like Conflict were preaching a new order that opposed what the British government represented.

Sorry droning on and on. My aspie brain has afforded me to pretty much remember loads of stuff about the history of punk so sorry do not want to seem like a know-it-all.

I will definitely check out the thing you said at the end.



punkguy378
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27 Jun 2013, 11:13 am

Fogman wrote:
Sadly, Punk Culture has been pretty much dying since the early 90's, but yeah, it was a great thing when it was alive and kicking.--Now it's just another thing that you buy at the mall.


meh! maybe in some ways. I am no longer really in the punk subculture per se. I mean I guess I am one of those who has changed a little bit but not "sold out". I am 33 and unemployed right now.

I honestly equated the scene with lots of drinking and drugs which I did as a teen. Became an alcoholic and had to sober up in order to stay alive. I guess going to punk shows could be a trigger for me but I think it has been long enough away from a drink to go to a few here and there. Just need to find friends to go with. Maybe if I found some sober punks but they just do not seem to exist around here in the ultra-conservative state of Rhode Island. Well I guess I have to hang around RISD to get a taste of the weird as far as more liberal clothing choices at least in RI.

Anyways it seems the punk scene in Boston is alive and well although that "TNT" show with a bunch of punk and Oi! bands in July got canned because of infighting in the Boston scene. I almost dated a girl and we were going to go but she kind of bailed on me. Kind of stinks. She was a really attractive rockabilly/punk girl and she had a masters in teaching, so she smart too which was a plus. Well I guess I am searching again but for some regular gal. Not too keen on that. I wish OKcupid had some rockabilly, goth, or punk gals have not seen any so far.



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27 Jun 2013, 11:19 am

I don't really see the point. I already unintentionally stand out like hell, break social rules, and listen to weird music. Also I don't feel like my clothing has to reflect myself and my personality or whatever. I used to be somewhat aligned with the subculture in middle school and high school, but then as I got older I got to doing whatever I wanted. So now I'm a weaboo kawaii Japanese pop listening man who spends 2 hours in the gym everyday trying to fulfill his childhood dream of becoming a Dragonball Z character.



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27 Jun 2013, 11:20 am

I'm involved in it in the sense that I'm in a punk band (I play keyboards), but there's no scene to speak of. I don't really dress like a punk. I have purple hair and wear eyeliner and sometimes leather but don't bother with trying to look punk in general. I'm not one for piericings and self-made clothes (haven't got the skill for the latter.) Sometimes I look very not punk. I dress more like a cross between punk and 50s beatnik.

It's about attitude to me. I started a band so I could write subversive songs and be different to other bands and not care too much about musicality. I felt like I didn't have much of a voice and writing songs allowed me to have one. I think it's a good outlet for someone with Asperger's because we have a different view on society to other people. It's a good type of music for outsiders.

I like most 70s punk bands to be honest, but my big thing is the Manchester scene from the late seventies. It fascinates me because I grew up and live there. I go to see The Fall and Buzzcocks when I can. I love Magazine and Joy Division, too.


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27 Jun 2013, 11:22 am

1000Knives wrote:
I don't really see the point. I already unintentionally stand out like hell, break social rules, and listen to weird music. Also I don't feel like my clothing has to reflect myself and my personality or whatever. I used to be somewhat aligned with the subculture in middle school and high school, but then as I got older I got to doing whatever I wanted. So now I'm a weaboo kawaii Japanese pop listening man who spends 2 hours in the gym everyday trying to fulfill his childhood dream of becoming a Dragonball Z character.


That's actually kind of funny (in a good way). The punk scene would accept someone like you if you wanted it. :lol:


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27 Jun 2013, 11:36 am

Lol I was a British punk rocker back in the seventies. I saw most of the original UK punk bands live, especially after I moved to London. At our local (the railway club in west hampstead) we often saw Sid vicious, Johnny Rotten and Siouxie Sioux hanging out, though I can't claim to have actually known them personally.

For me, being a Punk in the seventies was responsible for some of my best memories, because it was such an exciting and inventive time. I have moved on from that now, but the punk spirit is still within me in some ways.

P.S.My current favourite band is Rammstein, who to me are probably a lot closer to the true spirit of real punk than blink 182 et al.



1000Knives
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27 Jun 2013, 3:56 pm

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg4ZIxh2qgc[/youtube]
I try to do whatever I want. Including listening to not real punk music meant for teenage girls. I like what I like I guess.

EDIT:
This is like Japanese pop punk. It's pretty cool.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfpR_dj1iyI[/youtube]
http://www.kiwi-musume.com/lyrics/aikaw ... arenai.htm

puddingmouse wrote:
1000Knives wrote:
I don't really see the point. I already unintentionally stand out like hell, break social rules, and listen to weird music. Also I don't feel like my clothing has to reflect myself and my personality or whatever. I used to be somewhat aligned with the subculture in middle school and high school, but then as I got older I got to doing whatever I wanted. So now I'm a weaboo kawaii Japanese pop listening man who spends 2 hours in the gym everyday trying to fulfill his childhood dream of becoming a Dragonball Z character.


That's actually kind of funny (in a good way). The punk scene would accept someone like you if you wanted it. :lol:


I also wear mostly "preppy" clothes now and try to look as "normal" as possible. It's fun to me in some ways because it's like, wearing the clothes of the enemy, but also I generally don't wanna get noticed as I get noticed for being awkward/etc too much already. Also like, because I'm so weird, people will think I'm normal and then they'll see someone in preppy clothes and relatively clean cut and "cool" looking listening to Japanese pop music and using big giant intelligent words and being a super mega anarcho-libertarian person and their minds are blown.



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27 Jun 2013, 4:11 pm

Yeah, it's really punk to not fit in on the punk scene. You can't win, or you always win :P


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