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AspieUtah
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05 Jan 2016, 9:49 pm

Ashariel wrote:
AspieUtah wrote:
Modern writers have speculated that records of Hugh Blair might be consistent with a modern diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Blair_of_Borgue ). My diagnostician told me that Hugh's story is taught in medical and psychology colleges as the classic model of autism and ASD.

That is neat to learn! And it sure beats being descended from a mass murderer... I present to you my 10th great grandmother (like I said, I'm scared to dig any deeper!!) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Duston

Amazing! My Massachusetts ancestors were deeply involved in the Salem Witch Trials. I don't believe in continuing to condemn ancestors for their actions. We weren't there, so we couldn't be certain why they did what they did. Besides, history is frequently misunderstood. Most of all, we shouldn't use 21st-century morality to understand, say, 17th-century actions.


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Ashariel
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05 Jan 2016, 10:00 pm

AspieUtah wrote:
I don't believe in continuing to condemn ancestors for their actions. We weren't there, so we couldn't be certain why they did what they did. Besides, history is frequently misunderstood. Most of all, we shouldn't use 21st-century morality to understand, say, 17th-century actions.


That is a very wise attitude to take about it. Actually I think I'm descended from a Salem witch too - we're probably long-lost cousins! :D



BeaArthur
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05 Jan 2016, 10:49 pm

Me too, big into genealogy. At the moment, I seem to have mined out the sources of information I was using - censuses, historical newspapers online, grave sites, etc. Recently Ancestry.com added some wills and probate files, which was good but they only had a minority of my ancestors. I find every 2 to 5 years, a whole new vein of data is available. I do have a membership at Ancestry (US only, World is too expensive) and figure it's worth it to me, if nothing else because I use them as cloud storage for my photos and scanned documents. It's my only real hobby expenditure and I don't mind paying it.

You can look up their World collections at the historical library for free, and if you find any records (like a census) you can save that image and add it to your own collection later. The Mormons also have a free site where you can get many US census records and can have an online tree if you like.

I started doing my genealogy work before computers were big, Internet and so on. You had to go to a national archives site if you wanted to do any census work. Very laborious. I much prefer searching from home in my armchair!


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Darmok
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11 Feb 2017, 2:15 pm

One of the political threads has morphed into a genealogy thread, so I thought I'd bump this one up.

Genealogy is a very aspie-friendly subject -- if you haven't explored it, give it a try! You may be descended from actual Chreokee princesses (unlike Elizabeth Warren), or English Puritans (like Barack Obama), or Hebridean crofters (like Donald Trump). More records are now available online than ever before, and DNA testing is becoming cheaper every year. (Testing for lizard ancestry is still comparatively expensive, however.)


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naturalplastic
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11 Feb 2017, 3:11 pm

My dad got into our geneology back in the Seventies. Ended up publishing a little book about our ancestors back to the American Revolution.



Jabberwokky
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11 Feb 2017, 6:54 pm

Nice to see a thread that I started being resurrected. My own genealogical studies expanded beyond my wildest expectations. I have enough information to fill several books and am concerned I might never finish the job because of the competing requirements of general living and other interests that I have become equally passionate about.


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IstominFan
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11 Feb 2017, 9:17 pm

At the library, one of the areas I do shelving and shelf reading in is the genealogy section. I am very interested in that sort of thing. Right now, one of my interests is researching the meanings of people's names.

As for me, I am full German on my mother's side and third generation American of Italian descent on my father's.



Darmok
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28 Dec 2017, 6:46 pm

Just ordered an upgrade to my genealogy DNA test. Still trying to find my home planet. The last time they told me I wasn't in their species database. :mrgreen:


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bunnyb
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28 Dec 2017, 8:33 pm

There's an Ancestry DNA test ad on the TV that drives me up the wall. There is a silly woman saying the mix of genetics her test gave her and she reckons she's 51% Scandinavian, 7% Greek and Italian, 21% British and 21% Jewish. How on earth can a religious belief have specific genetic markers especially one as globally disseminated as Judaism?


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Darmok
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28 Dec 2017, 8:57 pm

bunnyb wrote:
There's an Ancestry DNA test ad on the TV that drives me up the wall. There is a silly woman saying the mix of genetics her test gave her and she reckons she's 51% Scandinavian, 7% Greek and Italian, 21% British and 21% Jewish. How on earth can a religious belief have specific genetic markers especially one as globally disseminated as Judaism?

Yes, the tests that supposedly tell you "You're 13% Outer Mongolian" are not especially scientific, except in a very general way. The ones that trace Y-DNA and mt-DNA can be more precise.


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Darmok
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20 Jul 2019, 12:05 pm

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jimmy m
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20 Jul 2019, 12:33 pm

I am not into genealogy but one of my many interest is 19th century U.S. photography. And I use many of the same tools as genealogist in my research. In a way I have become somewhat of an expert researcher for genealogist. I can look at old photographs and analyze it and determine the approximate age when it was taken (if it falls between 1840 and 1900)


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20 Jul 2019, 1:10 pm

I had a huge interest in genealogy when I was in middle school. I can trace my maternal line back to the 1600s, but could only trace my paternal line back a few generations. I have a distant cousin who is absolutely obsessed with it (may be on the spectrum), and most of what I know about my maternal line comes from him.


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20 Jul 2019, 2:15 pm

I did puzzles as a child and outgrew 5,000 piece puzzles upside down, inside out. Sooooo, when I discovered genealogy... the infinite-piece puzzle... What you said. So, since I have young children, I cut myself off from genealogy. Otherwise they would know their ggggggggggggggrandparents, but not their mother. I tell myself... later... in ten years, I'll get back to it. (In the meantime, I take 3-4 hours every once in a while.) And then I'll have to have a HUGE alarm clock to ensure I get to bed - or that I eat or see anyone outside the room. I look forward to it...

Enjoy!!



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21 Jul 2019, 1:14 am

Geneaology is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you'r gonna get.



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22 Jul 2019, 4:01 am

Darmok wrote:
Ashariel wrote:
... I've learned enough about my own family that I don't want to know any more! 8O


I find there are two categories of genealogists. One group wants to identify hundreds of remote cousins so they can hold a great big family reunion and socialize with big crowds of strangers. In other words, they wish to create an aspie nightmare.

The other group likes to organize information and discover complex interrelationships among obscure facts. These people like to trace ancestry backwards, because then they can be sure all the people involved are long dead and so won't impose many social demands. That's the group I fall into. :D


Interesting observation.

I'd identify with the latter group. I never liked the whole TAKE A DNA TEST AND DISCOVER THE THIRD COUSIN RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER THAT YOU NEVER KNEW YOU WERE RELATED TO aspect of some of these ancestry tests. No thank you. Yes, what you said is well-articulated. I can't understand the whole social aspect of ancestry/genealogy, but I like the backwards tracing just to put pieces together.