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diagnosedafter50
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28 Dec 2020, 7:03 pm

Not read whole of thread but personally I am glad, I got a diagnosis, have felt a freak all my life.
I wonder if the condition was suppressed so a couple of generations could feel lost.



kraftiekortie
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28 Dec 2020, 7:07 pm

Nope.....it wasn't "suppressed."

The diagnostic criteria for autism until 1994 was very limited. It was confined to what in the DSM-IV was called "autistic disorder," and approximately Levels 2 and 3 within the DSM-V (of "Autism Spectrum Disorder).

Basically, you had to not initiate social interactions, and (for the most part) be nonverbal. Many clinicians still believe that if someone initiates social interaction, and talks well, that person is "definitely not autistic."



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29 Dec 2020, 1:51 am

One of my queries with the notion that changes in diagnostic criteria have resulted in the increased diagnoses is that the changes to the criteria occur only once every few years. So for instance, one would expect the diagnostic changes in the early 1990s to produce a noticeable increase in diagnoses over the next few years, but that the rate of increase would level off over time. Instead, we are seeing a year-on-year increase over time with no levelling off. So that does not seem to fit?

This from wikipedia entry on autism epidemiology:

Quote:
A 2009 study of California data found that the reported incidence of autism rose 7- to 8-fold from the early 1990s to 2007, and that changes in diagnostic criteria, inclusion of milder cases, and earlier age of diagnosis probably explain only a 4.25-fold increase; the study did not quantify the effects of wider awareness of autism, increased funding, and expanding support options resulting in parents' greater motivation to seek services.[36]



kraftiekortie
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29 Dec 2020, 4:37 am

I attribute that to increased awareness from the general public over these years.

In fact, there HAS been a slowdown in increased incidence over the past few years. The greatest increase was probably during the 2000-2010 period.

I’m not saying “the broadening of the criteria” is the SOLE reason; but I believe it is the MAIN reason.

I’m not precluding other causes.



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29 Dec 2020, 6:58 pm

M-hm. You may be right.
It may just be me who has the feeling there's an underlying driver of the increase that we're missing.
And I can't find many convincing studies either way.



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12 Jan 2021, 1:57 am

Ah, here we are.
A study linking epigenetic markers (DNA methylation) in the father's sperm to autism in the child.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.11 ... 20-00995-2

and I noted this:

Quote:
The prevalence of ASD in 1975 was reported as 1 in 5000 and then in 2009 as 1 in 110 [3]. The American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a 1 in 88 prevalence in 2012 and then a 1 in 68 in 2014. Although improved diagnosis and current awareness have played a role in this increase, particularly in the first couple decades (1975–2000), the increase in the last two decades is thought to be due to environmental and molecular factors [2,3,4]. This is supported by twin studies and numerous environmental studies.



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12 Jan 2021, 2:08 am

This is very interesting also, regarding possible reasons for the rise in prevalence:

https://www.nature.com/news/2011/111102 ... 9022a.html



kraftiekortie
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12 Jan 2021, 7:58 am

I’m definitely not precluding genetic causation—but it is not inevitable that an autistic parent produce autistic children.

I know you’re not saying this—but an autistic person who denies his/herself the opportunity to have children is blocking his/herself from the potential good in having children. Many autistic folks have been good parents. We have many parents here.

We are not “genetic defectives.”

Indeed, there is much evidence for epigenetic causation, too.



MrsPeel
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13 Jan 2021, 12:05 am

Yes, I'm not disagreeing with that.
But I was thinking more about finding the environmental triggers of epigenetic changes.
In other words, say you have a pair of identical twins with the same genes, and one develops autism and the other does not. What triggered the autism in that case?



kraftiekortie
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13 Jan 2021, 5:08 am

That’s true.

I often wonder whether the trauma of vaccination, rather than the ingredients in the vaccines themselves, could lead to autism in those with a predisposition towards it.

(No.....I’m NOT an anti-vaxxer! :)



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13 Jan 2021, 11:41 am

MrsPeel wrote:
Yes, I'm not disagreeing with that.
But I was thinking more about finding the environmental triggers of epigenetic changes.
In other words, say you have a pair of identical twins with the same genes, and one develops autism and the other does not. What triggered the autism in that case?


This is from a new study: Identical twins are not so identical, study suggests



Jiheisho
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13 Jan 2021, 11:42 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
That’s true.

I often wonder whether the trauma of vaccination, rather than the ingredients in the vaccines themselves, could lead to autism in those with a predisposition towards it.

(No.....I’m NOT an anti-vaxxer! :)


Why not result in reduction of the risk of autism? Vaccines have been shown to give greater protection to people than simply from the disease they are targeting.



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13 Jan 2021, 11:59 am

Genetic evolution or mass poisoning, you decide! the data is inconclusive.


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MrsPeel
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13 Jan 2021, 7:11 pm

Jiheisho wrote:
MrsPeel wrote:
Yes, I'm not disagreeing with that.
But I was thinking more about finding the environmental triggers of epigenetic changes.
In other words, say you have a pair of identical twins with the same genes, and one develops autism and the other does not. What triggered the autism in that case?


This is from a new study: Identical twins are not so identical, study suggests


That's really interesting, thank you :)



kraftiekortie
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13 Jan 2021, 7:22 pm

I've read some twin studies which confirm that, frequently, either the severity of the autism is different from one twin to another----or that one twin has autism and the other twin doesn't.

Twin studies are actually fairly common in the autism literature.



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17 Jan 2021, 6:58 am

Zakatar wrote:
Simple: there appears to be an "increase" in autism because psychologists are better able to diagnose more subtle and female cases, not because there are actually more autistics now than 3-4 decades ago. A lot of so-called "high-functioning" autistics wouldn't have been diagnosed in 60s, 70s, or 80s.


I was just going to say something along these lines. The reason there seems to be an increase is because more people are on the radar. There is no epidemic and I wish the so-called experts would give it a rest and stop using that word. I am not an epidemic or a jigsaw.


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