Page 10 of 25 [ 394 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ... 25  Next

goldfish21
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2013
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,167
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

17 Mar 2021, 7:56 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
OutsideView wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
but the white supremacy stuff is dangerous mind pollution - it's very cleverly crafted to alter your thinking & programming, truly. I read it for the philosophy not realizing the extent of the white supremacy throughout it in advance.. and then I can attest that it most certainly did influence my thinking about race things & took some time and effort to deprogram that crap.

That's fascinating and terrifying at the same time!


Mhmm. I haven't read the Satanic Bible, but I do wonder if it may contain all the philosophy bits without the white supremacy stuff. Might be a better read for that reason, even though it's a plagiarized work.


There's nothing overtly white supremacist about it although it always gave me a similar vibe.


I see. Whereas the book it was plagiarized from is 100% one of the most white supremacist texts ever written. Hmm, perhaps the plagiarized version from the late 1960's is in fact a full offering of the philosophy without the white is right part. Maybe I'll get around to reading it someday. Maybe.


_________________
No :heart: for supporting trump. Because doing so is deplorable.


funeralxempire
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,893
Location: I'm right here

17 Mar 2021, 8:09 pm

goldfish21 wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
OutsideView wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
but the white supremacy stuff is dangerous mind pollution - it's very cleverly crafted to alter your thinking & programming, truly. I read it for the philosophy not realizing the extent of the white supremacy throughout it in advance.. and then I can attest that it most certainly did influence my thinking about race things & took some time and effort to deprogram that crap.

That's fascinating and terrifying at the same time!


Mhmm. I haven't read the Satanic Bible, but I do wonder if it may contain all the philosophy bits without the white supremacy stuff. Might be a better read for that reason, even though it's a plagiarized work.


There's nothing overtly white supremacist about it although it always gave me a similar vibe.


I see. Whereas the book it was plagiarized from is 100% one of the most white supremacist texts ever written. Hmm, perhaps the plagiarized version from the late 1960's is in fact a full offering of the philosophy without the white is right part. Maybe I'll get around to reading it someday. Maybe.


It's a more colour-blind version of the Übermensch.

It's kinda similar to Ayn Rand's worldview as well.



goldfish21
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2013
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,167
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

17 Mar 2021, 9:21 pm

Yeah, that sounds like the rest of the book.. but I do wonder if it's just flat out plagiarized enough to have the same "wow!" factor of Ragnar Redbeard's writing. Whoever that dude was.. was truly a well read & educated man with a talent for writing. It's just too bad so much of his knowledge & energy was directed towards white supremacy, as it's 100% without a doubt helped perpetuate that mentality for the last 130 years. Maybe even more than any other text ever written - I dunno.


_________________
No :heart: for supporting trump. Because doing so is deplorable.


cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,302

18 Mar 2021, 2:56 am

goldfish21 wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
And no, I didn't buy it for the racism. I bought & read it for the philosophy. It just Also came with a heavy dose of white supremacy - which is very unhealthy mind pollution.


Virtually anything published before 1960 is going to be problematic


It was first published in 1896. It's embraced by Satanists & white supremacists. Anton LaVey plagiarised it to write the Satanic Bible.


Fascinating! I watched a documentary on the influence of European supremacist cults on the European aristocracy of the late 19th and earl 20th centuries. These groups provided much of the theoretical basis for crackpot beliefs that made up early nazism. QAnon people could learn a thing or two how gullible white folk are.


Not sure if the author was European born.. maybe. It (Might is Right) was written by an anonymous Chicago area Doctor, under the pen name "Ragnar Redbeard," and he was very clearly an incredibly well read man.. for the historical references throughout the book are plentiful. It was nice reading a version that had a lot of footnote explanations of things. The Might is Right/Survival of the Fittest philosophy stuff is fantastic.. but the white supremacy stuff is dangerous mind pollution - it's very cleverly crafted to alter your thinking & programming, truly. I read it for the philosophy not realizing the extent of the white supremacy throughout it in advance.. and then I can attest that it most certainly did influence my thinking about race things & took some time and effort to deprogram that crap. It's Very well written, and when you're reading something by someone who was Obviously very well read, it's easy to begin believing their personal opinions about things - it's like conspiracy theories where they sandwich some facts around garbage and the facts give validity to the garbage.

No regrets reading it. May even get another copy and read it again someday.. maybe - for the philosophy; it's very empowering. The biggest reason I wouldn't re-read it is to avoid whatever influence the race stuff could have that I'd then have to consciously undo. However, being older and more mature with a much better overall view on racism, maybe it wouldn't be able to influence my thinking about that stuff much.

This is the version I read based on reviews stating the footnote explanations were the best:

Image

It truly is one of the best books I've ever read. There's a reason that politicians and military generals read it. It's Very empowering. But it's Also one of the worst books I've ever read and ever written.. because of the white is right component to it - it's some serious poison, and probably a big part of the reason it's banned in some countries. However, it may be banned more so because it preaches fierce independence (from government) & personal responsibility.. probably not types of thinking that collective societies want to encourage when group think & obedience are prized as methods to manipulate and control populations.


Interesting! I'll check it out...



cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,302

18 Mar 2021, 3:02 am

goldfish21 wrote:
Yeah, that sounds like the rest of the book.. but I do wonder if it's just flat out plagiarized enough to have the same "wow!" factor of Ragnar Redbeard's writing. Whoever that dude was.. was truly a well read & educated man with a talent for writing. It's just too bad so much of his knowledge & energy was directed towards white supremacy, as it's 100% without a doubt helped perpetuate that mentality for the last 130 years. Maybe even more than any other text ever written - I dunno.


My understanding is the spiritual mother of the aryan supremacy theories so popular in Europe was from the writings of a Russian aristocrat Madam Helena Blavatsky. Blavatsky's writing in the 1800s was highly aligned with eastern mysticism and its the likely source of the hindu swastika becoming associated with her creation of the aryan supermen of Europe.

Despite her likely being the founder of nazi philosophy she was a remarkable woman of her time and extemely open minded to many spiritual beliefs including the theosophist movement which she founded.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 25,229
Location: Long Island, New York

28 Mar 2021, 2:13 pm

A critique of Critical Race Theory from a Muslim-American writer

Quote:
Middle school is terrible for everyone, but you’re going to have to trust me that it was rougher on me than many. I was short, funny-looking, and a practicing Muslim in a town called Kennesaw, Georgia, where I almost never met anyone who looked like me or who worshipped like me. I was relentlessly picked on and beat up on a regular basis.

Ninth grade was my opportunity for a new identity. In attending a magnet school that was outside of my normal district, I had the chance, at last, to make new friends. But I often found myself being misinterpreted or misunderstood.

There was a student in one of my classes with whom I got into arguments over trivial things.

We were all asked to keep diaries to describe our experiences in class. I mentioned in that diary that I thought I didn’t get along with this other student because he was Jewish. A teacher read the diary and asked me to speak to a school administrator.

That administrator was a calm, soft-spoken man who used the conversation to learn more about me. He quickly realized that I had anxiety issues and was struggling to fit in. He pointed to the comments I had written about my classmate and suggested to me that they were antisemitic. I was judging him on the basis of stereotypes I had about Jewish people, not based on who he was.

Here is a good moment to reflect on the fact that I am a Pakistani-American Muslim. Our community is warm and generous, hardworking and inventive. My parents came to this country in the 1970s because they knew it was welcoming to people like us. Unlike life on the Indian subcontinent, here you aren’t instantly judged by your ethnic group, sect or caste. In America, we were free to be whoever we wanted to be.

But every community has its problems. Antisemitism was ours. The data bears this out: one ADL poll found that more than half the Muslim populations of some Western European countries hold antisemitic attitudes.

In political conversations and at social gatherings, it was all too common to hear ordinary Jewish people get conflated with extreme actors, like far-right Israeli politicians, or to hear about complicated conspiracies involving Jews that, if nothing else, are far too elaborate to ever reflect reality.

What saved me from the same fate — of holding ignorant beliefs about an entire people — was that extraordinary administrator. The most important thing he impressed on me, calmly and without shaming me, was that my classmate, like me, was an individual. He wasn’t an avatar of some kind of monolithic group. And neither was I.

The primacy of the individual — that we judge people not by their lineage but by their deeds — is at the very foundation of a free society and of the American experiment. Here, unlike so many other places, including Pakistan, the law and our common culture insists that we see people as individuals who are the product of their character, not their tribe, family, race, or status.

This wisdom has come under sustained assault by an ideology that insists that we are, in fact, avatars of various demographic markers — race, gender, sexuality — rather than complex human beings.

Critical Race Theory sees people not as individuals, but more like the Borg from Star Trek. It insists that white people are inevitably oppressors and that African-Americans are inherently oppressed. And everyone else, like Schrödinger’s cat, exist in a kind of liminal position, playing the role of victims or victimizers depending on the situation. That is how, in the context of the admissions process at Stuyvesant, Asians are seen as “white-adjacent” and privileged, but in the context of street crime, they are cast as victims. Attributes of specific races are assumed.

Even after yesterday’s tragic shooting in a Boulder grocery store, this racist illogic reared its head. “It’s always an angry white man. always,” tweeted a “race and inclusion editor” at USA Today. A senior editor at Deadspin tweeted: “Extremely tired of people's lives depending on whether a white man with an AR-15 is having a good day or not.” Kamala Harris’s niece, Meena, offered: “violent white men are the greatest terrorist threat to our country.”

Perhaps the most disturbing, sustained example of the way this ideology distorts the truth is the coverage of ongoing violence against Asian-Americans, most recently last week’s Atlanta-area murders, in which six of the eight victims were Asian.

If you thumb through news articles from the past few days or read over statements from leading politicians, you’d imagine that the Ku Klux Klan is responsible for the spree of robberies, assaults and murders of Asian-Americans across the nation. The phrase “white supremacy” is used repeatedly. The Root’s Damon Young, for instance, took the occasion of the shooting to declare that “whiteness is a pandemic.” While it’s true that the shooter in Atlanta was a young white man, there is no evidence that he was a “white supremacist,” as Young writes. The facts we know so far suggest that he was motivated by perverse sexual beliefs, not racial hatred.

This narrative is pervasive, but it bears no relationship to the evidence before us. Not only are none of the high-profile attackers over the past few months white supremacists, many of them aren’t even white.

One recent study looked at hate crimes carried out between 1992 and 2014. It concluded that around 25% of those that carried out anti-Asian hate crimes during this period were nonwhite.

Last year, the NYPD arrested 20 people accused of anti-Asian hate crimes. Two of them were white.

Those are just hate crimes — crimes in which the suspect explicitly declares a racial motivation. If you look at all violent crimes, you’ll see a picture that diverges even more sharply from the white supremacy narrative.

This is relevant because much of the violence that has occurred over the past year doesn’t neatly fit into the hate crime category.

So why are so many self-described liberals embracing an ideology that seems to insist that white racism is the only kind of racism? That bigotry only counts when the perpetrator comes from a “powerful” group? That denies that the same person can be both a victim and a victimizer?

I suspect that many white liberals — ridden with guilt over American history and biases that still exist among the white majority — believe they are doing minorities like me a favor by denying us the responsibility of addressing our own prejudices. Critical race theorists often argue that the true definition of racism should be prejudice plus power, implying that only whites can be racist But hidden within that construction is the assumption that minorities can never be powerful.

My high school administrator disagreed. He looked at me and saw a young man full of potential.

You cannot have power without responsibility. Denying minorities responsibility for their own actions, both good and bad, will only deny us the power we rightly deserve.


The original headline read "White People Don't Have a Monopoly on Hatred". Critical Race Theory/"woke" ideology says no such thing. It posits as of 2021 that black people can not be racists and every white is a racist and privileged no matter what the individual circumstance due to power dynamics.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 25,229
Location: Long Island, New York

31 Mar 2021, 8:57 am

Passover seder’s takeaways speak to the woke divide It turns out that the Haggadah has plenty to say about cancel culture.
Rabbi Marvin Hier is the dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, its Museum of Tolerance and of Moriah, the Center’s film division. Rabbi Abraham Cooper is associate dean and director of Global Social Action at the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Quote:
This year, all generations sitting around the table would be well-advised to take a deeper dive into the Haggadah—the narrative retelling the epic Exodus of the Hebrew slaves from ancient Egypt. It turns out that the Haggadah has plenty to say about a woke/cancel culture.

There is nothing woke about the seder. In fact, here are some points to keep in mind.

Jews are all about memory.

Far from erasing the past, the Haggadah insists we re-enact it.

The past, warts and all, is key to understanding who we are.

The struggle to define and maintain one’s identity is not new. The Hebrews came to Egypt as 12 fledgling families. They left a nation. How did that happen? While the progeny of the 12 sons of Jacob successfully assimilated into Egyptian society, they retained their identity. Despite the power of the dominant culture, despite escalating discrimination culminating in abject slavery, the Hebrews kept their language, their original names and their distinct garb.

Symbols of slavery can be transformed into symbols of freedom. Matzah is called “poor man’s bread.” We are told that slaves would break off a piece and keep it hidden, never sure that the next meal was coming. Yet matzah quickly emerged as a symbol of victory over slavery. And so, a powerful symbol of suffering and hopelessness can remind us and teach our children about hope, perseverance and triumph.

Don’t hide past tragedies. At a pivotal moment of the seder, we eat the bitter herbs to momentarily taste the bitterness of slavery. But we are told to dip it into a sweet concoction called charoset. Takeaway: What doesn’t break you can make you stronger. We were slaves, look how far we have come.

Let your past tragedies guide your actions. Throughout the biblical narrative, Jews are admonished scores of times. You were once a slave, you were once the stranger in a strange land, you were once the odd man out in an alien culture: Remember how that felt and remember to treat every stranger you meet with dignity and respect.

We are not commanded to hate (read cancel) the Egyptian people. Our sages remind us that before they enslaved the Hebrews, Egypt had welcomed them and initially allowed them to thrive. It’s a powerful, nuanced lesson—one that would be lost on any culture too committed to erase the past rather than be able to learn from it.

Community is the foundation of identity. On this night, you had to celebrate with a group of friends or family of your choosing. Called a chabura, the word comes from the root means “binding.”

Actions of our fathers instruct their children.” This dictum has been embedded in the DNA of the children of Abraham and Sarah for 3,500 years.

As the Hebrew slaves rushed to leave Egypt, Moses rushed back to retrieve the bones of Joseph. By doing so, Moses created a teaching moment for the ages. None of us can predict the future, but we will all be better equipped to deal with the unknown by carrying the legacy of our past with us.

These teachings first spoke to us Jews, but they can also guide our beloved America and other democratic societies that seem to have lost their grounding and traction. The Jewish experience has taught that without a past, there is no future. Shared values and a sense of community are the only guarantors for a future anchored in freedom.

So, on this Passover, let’s counsel before we cancel.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


goldfish21
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2013
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,167
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

31 Mar 2021, 9:41 am

Wtf are you suggesting with that post? That black Americans celebrate slavery and gays celebrate homophobia and bigotry? :? :roll:

Comes across as "Old man grasping at straws trying to justify holding onto racist & bigoted ways because somehow these reminders are supposed to be good for the oppressed."

lol, No. Evolve.


_________________
No :heart: for supporting trump. Because doing so is deplorable.


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 48,932
Location: Stendec

31 Mar 2021, 9:51 am

goldfish21 wrote:
Wtf are you suggesting with that post? That black Americans celebrate slavery and gays celebrate homophobia and bigotry? :? :roll:

Comes across as "Old man grasping at straws trying to justify holding onto racist & bigoted ways because somehow these reminders are supposed to be good for the oppressed."

lol, No. Evolve.
Keep in mind that the quote came from Rabbi Abraham Cooper, and was only posted by ASPartOfMe.


_________________
 Link to Official List of Trump's Atrocities 

45OFFICE = TRE45ON
Lock Him Up!


goldfish21
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2013
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,167
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

31 Mar 2021, 10:02 am

Fnord wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
Wtf are you suggesting with that post? That black Americans celebrate slavery and gays celebrate homophobia and bigotry? :? :roll:

Comes across as "Old man grasping at straws trying to justify holding onto racist & bigoted ways because somehow these reminders are supposed to be good for the oppressed."

lol, No. Evolve.
Keep in mind that the quote came from Rabbi Abraham Cooper, and was only posted by ASPartOfMe.



I acknowledge that - but what other message was ASPartOfMe intending to convey with that post if not my interpretation? :? Hence my post consisting of two questions of him for clarification and an explanation of what it comes across as To Me.

IMO, their tradition of acknowledging surviving slavery and exile is a bit like remembering the holocaust. No one is celebrating either. It's just that as I read it, it came across as a bit of a snarky old man suggesting that reminders of oppression are good for the oppressed. And I say No to that - especially if it's oppressors, or descendants of oppressors that want to carry on oppressive culture.

Different story when Black Americans want to sing freedom songs & celebrate their increased success over generations, or if LGBT people want to have a massive party to celebrate Pride -> gays aren't joyously celebrating bigotry against them; they're celebrating equal human rights and basic dignity.

A bit like oppressed cultures can say certain words that oppressors cannot - Black American musicians using the "N word," or gays using the "F word." Those people and cultures can use those words, reclaim them, own them, redefine them.. but an oppressive bigot using them in any form and then considering it a justified reminder of history that the oppressed should have some sort of respect & appreciation for? :? Naaaaah! Doesn't work like that.



*and if that is not what ASPartOfMe intended at all, my bad. But based on his posting history, I don't think I'm too far off base with my responses here & feel justified in my explanation of the social "double standards," that exist about who gets to remind who about history & why.


_________________
No :heart: for supporting trump. Because doing so is deplorable.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,923
Location: Queens, NYC

31 Mar 2021, 10:47 am

ASPartOfMe, I know, is not the kind of guy who believes gays celebrate homophobia, and blacks celebrate slavery----that I know for sure.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 25,229
Location: Long Island, New York

31 Mar 2021, 5:55 pm

goldfish21 wrote:
Fnord wrote:
goldfish21 wrote:
Wtf are you suggesting with that post? That black Americans celebrate slavery and gays celebrate homophobia and bigotry? :? :roll:

Comes across as "Old man grasping at straws trying to justify holding onto racist & bigoted ways because somehow these reminders are supposed to be good for the oppressed."

lol, No. Evolve.
Keep in mind that the quote came from Rabbi Abraham Cooper, and was only posted by ASPartOfMe.



I acknowledge that - but what other message was ASPartOfMe intending to convey with that post if not my interpretation? :? Hence my post consisting of two questions of him for clarification and an explanation of what it comes across as To Me.

IMO, their tradition of acknowledging surviving slavery and exile is a bit like remembering the holocaust. No one is celebrating either. It's just that as I read it, it came across as a bit of a snarky old man suggesting that reminders of oppression are good for the oppressed. And I say No to that - especially if it's oppressors, or descendants of oppressors that want to carry on oppressive culture.

Different story when Black Americans want to sing freedom songs & celebrate their increased success over generations, or if LGBT people want to have a massive party to celebrate Pride -> gays aren't joyously celebrating bigotry against them; they're celebrating equal human rights and basic dignity.

A bit like oppressed cultures can say certain words that oppressors cannot - Black American musicians using the "N word," or gays using the "F word." Those people and cultures can use those words, reclaim them, own them, redefine them.. but an oppressive bigot using them in any form and then considering it a justified reminder of history that the oppressed should have some sort of respect & appreciation for? :? Naaaaah! Doesn't work like that.



*and if that is not what ASPartOfMe intended at all, my bad. But based on his posting history, I don't think I'm too far off base with my responses here & feel justified in my explanation of the social "double standards," that exist about who gets to remind who about history & why.


The assumption that being anti woke automatically means being a racist f**k is what partially all my anti woke posts are about. The assumption that all opposing evolving is bad is based on the false assumption that all change is good is partially what that all those posts are about. The assumption that all opposing change by an autistic person is because of his autism is ableist. If that is not what Goldfish intended my bad.

FYI since I am Jewish that particular instance of slavery is part of my group's history. We read a small book called the Haggadah every Passover and it is not about celebrating our slavery but celebrating our emancipation from it. The book also has "Freedom songs" in it. Besides a celebration of emancipation, it also serves the dual purpose of reminding us in a similar vein as Holocaust remembrance.

The message from the Rabbis that I agree with is "let’s counsel before we cancel". That is it. Society is going in the other direction, I assume the Rabbis know that and felt the need to address it.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


cyberdad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,302

31 Mar 2021, 7:37 pm

The problem is the anti-woke backlash is hiding those who use it as a smokescreen to attack advocates for social justice. I can't comfortably get into bed with people who are prejudiced against minorities as I share nothing in common with such people other than feeling some pity if its the way they have been conditioned from birth to hate those who are weak and vulnerable (the classic rugged individualist).



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 25,229
Location: Long Island, New York

31 Mar 2021, 8:40 pm

cyberdad wrote:
The problem is the anti-woke backlash is hiding those who use it as a smokescreen to attack advocates for social justice. I can't comfortably get into bed with people who are prejudiced against minorities as I share nothing in common with such people other than feeling some pity if its the way they have been conditioned from birth to hate those who are weak and vulnerable (the classic rugged individualist).

I agree it is a problem, possibly a fatal one.

All I can do is try and find and use non-bigoted sourcing.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


funeralxempire
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,893
Location: I'm right here

31 Mar 2021, 9:01 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
I agree it is a problem, possibly a fatal one.

All I can do is try and find and use non-bigoted sourcing.


I appreciate that it's something you're aware of and mindful of because it negates the main criticism I have of most of the 'anti-woke' backlash.


_________________
politics is dumb but very important
戦争ではなく戦争と戦う


ironpony
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 3 Nov 2015
Age: 36
Posts: 2,768
Location: canada

01 Apr 2021, 1:09 am

Well it seems that the woke powers are growing more and more with calling for things to be cancelled that have something African-American in them, such as Aunt Jemima's Syrup, or Uncle Ben's rice, or wanting black voices to be taken out of old Disney movies, etc.

But how far is cancelling everything that can be considered exploitative to black people going to go? 10 years from now for example is the woke government going to have the power to shut down an African cuisine restaurant, because it's Africans being exploited, even if a lot of people like the restaurant, and are not exploiting them? Or would they have the power to shut down hip hop music as a genre, because it was born out of black people being brought to the US against their will, if you go back far enough, etc?