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mohsart
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04 Jun 2021, 12:28 pm

Am I happy, sad, depressed? I don't think I can tell.
I have some tell tales, when I overdo the whistling/humming is one. I usually stop naturally at around 9 pm on workdays and I'm totally quiet during weekends. But if I'm not feeling too good I just keep making sounds.
I also tend to grind my teeth in my sleep when I'm not OK.
And I lose interest in eating, sleeping, and even smoking (for a 1-2 pack a day smoker that's a big deal).
And of course everyday tasks like doing the dishes, cleaning house, mowing the lawn, paying bills...

I don't feel any different than usual though.

/Mats


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timf
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05 Jun 2021, 11:04 am

Feelings can be an indicator when things are going right or wrong in life.

The teeth grinding can be a problem especially if you crack one. The smoking can cause all sorts of damage. I smoked for 20 years and haven't smoked in 30 years. However, I have had peripheral edema related to damage to the circulatory system. I have been able to repair a little of the edema with various herbs, but old age is difficult enough without adding problems.



mohsart
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05 Jun 2021, 2:34 pm

It would be useful to be able to read that indicator.
It would also help when doing tests like "How depressed are you? (1-5)"


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ToughDiamond
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06 Jun 2021, 3:53 pm

Reminds me of the time when a technical problem I was working on started to go all wrong and bogged down, and by chance I noticed that I was feeling too hot. "Ooh!" I thought, "I must be getting stressed." Then I wondered why I'd had to deduce that from the physical observation.

But I seem able to relate well enough to descriptions of people's feelings and their causes in fiction. That all seems natural and normal enough to me.



blazingstar
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06 Jun 2021, 5:06 pm

I would say that over my lifespan, being unable to tell what my feelings were was probably pretty common. I'm not sure I thought about it all that much. I just reacted.

I've been spending more time in past couple of decades as to what I feel, mostly so I can figure out what to do about various problems.

I don't whistle, but I do hum and sing to myself. This seems to happen when I am more or less engaged with life and am happy (although I am not for sure what that is yet.)

I also start be-bopping sing when in a situation in which I have to be alert. Like getting stuck on a branch in the middle of the river which is inverting the bottom of the canoe and I have to figure out how to slide the canoe off it without dumping.

I have spent about a decade figuring out the difference between being sad, being in physical pain, and being tired. They all pretty much feel the same to me. I pretty much just have to take a nap when one of those happens, if possible.

If you figure anything out, I'd love to hear it.


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mohsart
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07 Jun 2021, 1:20 am

This is a pretty new thought for me, so it's gonna need some figuring.
As for making sound, I do it in many different situations. Most common are when there's a background sound and when I'm working with monotonous, repetetive tasks, eg chopping wood, where the work acts like a base drum to the melodies I produce.
But when I'm stressed or feeling bad is some way, I do it without that kind of stimuli.

/Mats


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