Critical Race Theory B- what is it, and why NOT teach it?

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magz
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17 Jul 2021, 4:52 am

What I would see as a danger about adding the topic of systematic racism to curriculum would be a risk that it would be taught as some absolute truth instead of dynamically evolving reality.

I think including the dark pages in the standard history course would be safer in this regard.


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kraftiekortie
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17 Jul 2021, 5:12 am

It is an absolute truth in US history……but the present-day white students shouldn’t be held responsible for it. The responsibility lies in who perpetrated the systemic racism.



magz
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17 Jul 2021, 5:19 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
It is an absolute truth in US history……but the present-day white students shouldn’t be held responsible for it. The responsibility lies in who perpetrated the systemic racism.

By "absolute", I mean everywhere, every time.

As a part of history teaching - including how it evolved over time - absolutely.


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kraftiekortie
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17 Jul 2021, 5:23 am

Critical race theory is primarily derived from a US/Western European perspective.

I absolutely don’t believe it should be taught as an “absolute” within a global context.



magz
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17 Jul 2021, 5:24 am

Even Western European perspective differs a lot from North American in this regard.


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kraftiekortie
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17 Jul 2021, 5:26 am

No doubt :)

I agree 100%.

What you say applies probably more to Scandinavia than to most other Western European nations and their former colonies.

Slavery and the West African triangular slave trade is behind a lot of the institutionalized racism as practiced, especially, in the US. But places like Canada and Australia practiced it as well.

Especially in the US, racism is deeply psychological. Even Freudian at times.



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17 Jul 2021, 11:08 am

Bradleigh wrote:
TheRobotLives wrote:
However, racial inequality does not mean the causations were because of racism.

For example, Amazon CEO Bezos's wealth earned within the last 20 years, is likely being used to show *system racism* based on wealth inequality.


Does systematic racism via things like racial inequality need something like people being [b]evil little racists[/b] to be a problem?

Is there a reason that the percentage of rich CEOs is not proportional to the general population?

Well, are you concerned black people are way over-represented in US professional sports?

Does such racial inequality bother you without there being "evil little racists" as you say?


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17 Jul 2021, 11:37 am

I spent some time reading Critical Theory - which is the basis of Critical Race Theory - during my university education (as it was part of the curriculum). I wasn't impressed.

To me, it is an ill-defined mixture of social constructionism and Marxism which in no way meets the standards of a rigorous scientific theory, where hypotheses can be formulated and tested against empirical evidence.

That being said, this is a monument in Washington...

Image

... and a country where such a grandiose monument is erected to a rapist who owned hundreds of slaves, compared black people to Orangutans and called for the genocide of Native Americans is certainly in need of some *very* critical assessments.

... But I don't see why this criticism needs to be based on the views of some long-dead philosophy professors at the Goethe University Frankfurt under the Weimar Republic. :shrug:



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17 Jul 2021, 12:20 pm

Jefferson had some good intentions—but he was too much a person of his times.

He believed slavery, in the abstract, was abhorrent….but he was economically dependent upon it.