Mayor of LA Signs Ordinance Criminalizing Homelessness

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Nades
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02 Aug 2021, 10:21 am

Fnord wrote:
Nades wrote:
Fnord wrote:
QuietThoughts wrote:
Maybe some people like being homeless. Who's to say they have a problem if they choose that way of living?
The taxpayers who can no longer access the beaches and parks they pay for; the merchants whose customers are scared off by filthy, drug-crazed people demanding to be paid for the use of "their" sidewalks; and the homeowners afraid to leave their own homes because strangers are literally camped out on the front lawns.  Sure, let the bums choose to be homeless; but there are still vast stretches of wilderness in which they can practice their lifestyle instead of parasitizing honest, hard-working city-dwellers.
Same in cities around here. The pestering for money is unbelievable and some will relentlessly hound you and follow you until you give in. I stopped handing money out now because I've nearly been mugged twice once they realise what pocket your wallet is in.
Wise move.

Those who seem to believe that homelessness does not involve addiction, criminal behavior, and threats to public safety and health need to spend a year on Skid Row with no outside help.  If they survive, they will come away with new-found respect for those who make their livings with honest work, and contempt for those who do not.



Many seem to wrongly assume homelessness is the root cause of someone's problems when in reality it's just the final and often well deserved branch. Homes just don't vanish into thin air.

It should be abundantly obvious that someone with collapsed veins, perpetual diarrhea, a hobby of mugging people and the cognitive abilities of a brain damaged slug isn't somehow going to become a model citizen with a roof over their head. Chances are they'll rip the roof slates off and sell them for crack instead.

Another tactic they love around here is latching on to a vulnerable person who's on disability benefits and inviting more and more of their friends over to live indefinitely in said vulnerable persons house and intimidate him/her into submission.

They should keep homeless drug addicts and mentally disabled people separate in emergency accomodation here.........they don't it's obvious what happens next.



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02 Aug 2021, 10:33 am

Nades wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Nades wrote:
Fnord wrote:
QuietThoughts wrote:
Maybe some people like being homeless. Who's to say they have a problem if they choose that way of living?
The taxpayers who can no longer access the beaches and parks they pay for; the merchants whose customers are scared off by filthy, drug-crazed people demanding to be paid for the use of "their" sidewalks; and the homeowners afraid to leave their own homes because strangers are literally camped out on the front lawns.  Sure, let the bums choose to be homeless; but there are still vast stretches of wilderness in which they can practice their lifestyle instead of parasitizing honest, hard-working city-dwellers.
Same in cities around here. The pestering for money is unbelievable and some will relentlessly hound you and follow you until you give in. I stopped handing money out now because I've nearly been mugged twice once they realise what pocket your wallet is in.
Wise move.  Those who seem to believe that homelessness does not involve addiction, criminal behavior, and threats to public safety and health need to spend a year on Skid Row with no outside help.  If they survive, they will come away with new-found respect for those who make their livings with honest work, and contempt for those who do not.
Many seem to wrongly assume homelessness is the root cause of someone's problems when in reality it's just the final and often well deserved branch.  Homes just don't vanish into thin air. It should be abundantly obvious that someone with collapsed veins, perpetual diarrhea, a hobby of mugging people and the cognitive abilities of a brain damaged slug isn't somehow going to become a model citizen with a roof over their head.  Chances are they'll rip the roof slates off and sell them for crack instead.  Another tactic they love around here is latching on to a vulnerable person who's on disability benefits and inviting more and more of their friends over to live indefinitely in said vulnerable persons house and intimidate him/her into submission.  They should keep homeless drug addicts and mentally disabled people separate in emergency accommodation here... they don't it's obvious what happens next.
In my case, homelessness was the result of trusting the wrong people and feeling sorry for others.  Losing everything I had taught me some valuable lessons; here are a few:

1) Some people have no ambition of their own, except that which motivates them to parasitize others.
2) Once your money is gone, friends are no longer friends, and family will abandon you.
3) You can never gain wealth by giving money away (DUH!).
4) Some people simply cannot be rehabilitated, no matter how many chances they are given.
5) Sharing the wealth makes everybody poor.



Nades
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02 Aug 2021, 10:38 am

Fnord wrote:
Nades wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Nades wrote:
Fnord wrote:
QuietThoughts wrote:
Maybe some people like being homeless. Who's to say they have a problem if they choose that way of living?
The taxpayers who can no longer access the beaches and parks they pay for; the merchants whose customers are scared off by filthy, drug-crazed people demanding to be paid for the use of "their" sidewalks; and the homeowners afraid to leave their own homes because strangers are literally camped out on the front lawns.  Sure, let the bums choose to be homeless; but there are still vast stretches of wilderness in which they can practice their lifestyle instead of parasitizing honest, hard-working city-dwellers.
Same in cities around here. The pestering for money is unbelievable and some will relentlessly hound you and follow you until you give in. I stopped handing money out now because I've nearly been mugged twice once they realise what pocket your wallet is in.
Wise move.  Those who seem to believe that homelessness does not involve addiction, criminal behavior, and threats to public safety and health need to spend a year on Skid Row with no outside help.  If they survive, they will come away with new-found respect for those who make their livings with honest work, and contempt for those who do not.
Many seem to wrongly assume homelessness is the root cause of someone's problems when in reality it's just the final and often well deserved branch.  Homes just don't vanish into thin air. It should be abundantly obvious that someone with collapsed veins, perpetual diarrhea, a hobby of mugging people and the cognitive abilities of a brain damaged slug isn't somehow going to become a model citizen with a roof over their head.  Chances are they'll rip the roof slates off and sell them for crack instead.  Another tactic they love around here is latching on to a vulnerable person who's on disability benefits and inviting more and more of their friends over to live indefinitely in said vulnerable persons house and intimidate him/her into submission.  They should keep homeless drug addicts and mentally disabled people separate in emergency accommodation here... they don't it's obvious what happens next.
In my case, homelessness was the result of trusting the wrong people and feeling sorry for others.  Losing everything I had taught me some valuable lessons; here are a few:

1) Some people have no ambition of their own, except that which motivates them to parasitize others.
2) Once your money is gone, friends are no longer friends, and family will abandon you.
3) You can never gain wealth by giving money away (DUH!).
4) Some people simply cannot be rehabilitated, no matter how many chances they are given.
5) Sharing the wealth makes everybody poor.


Out if interest, what happened to result in your homelessness? You're literally the first person I heard of to become homeless without injecting smack into their anal sphincter.



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02 Aug 2021, 10:52 am

Nades wrote:
Out if interest, what happened to result in your homelessness? You're literally the first person I heard of to become homeless without injecting smack into their anal sphincter.
As I said, in my case, homelessness was the result of trusting the wrong people and feeling sorry for others -- like my ex-wife, who was a bipolar (unbeknownst to me) alcoholic (unbeknownst to me) with a drug-abuse problem of her own (unbeknownst to me).  I provided a few unsecured loans to someone else whose business had run into some turbulence.  He also had substance-abuse problems (unbeknownst to me).  He and my ex-wife began a "relationship" behind my back (also unbeknownst to me).  She then convinced him to use his new-found prosperity to finance her divorce from me, and his business connections to have me "laid off" from my employer.

In rapid order, I found myself jobless, homeless, penniless, and with a lot of debt I had not incurred.

I was stupid and naïve -- trusting and sympathizing too much.  Never again.  Never, ever again.



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02 Aug 2021, 10:59 am

Fnord wrote:
Nades wrote:
Out if interest, what happened to result in your homelessness? You're literally the first person I heard of to become homeless without injecting smack into their anal sphincter.
As I said, in my case, homelessness was the result of trusting the wrong people and feeling sorry for others -- like my ex-wife, who was a bipolar (unbeknownst to me) alcoholic (unbeknownst to me) with a drug-abuse problem of her own (unbeknownst to me).  I provided a few unsecured loans to someone else whose business had run into some turbulence.  He also had substance-abuse problems (unbeknownst to me).  He and my ex-wife began a "relationship" behind my back (also unbeknownst to me).  She then convinced him to use his new-found prosperity to finance her divorce from me, and his business connections to have me "laid off" from my employer.

In rapid order, I found myself jobless, homeless, penniless, and with a lot of debt I had not incurred.

I was stupid and naïve -- trusting and sympathizing too much.  Never again.  Never, ever again.


Damn. Yeah...that do it. The planets aligned, you got a hole in one and got struck by lightning simultaneously for that to happen and not on a good way. I'm seriously lacking in empathy on the best of days but holy fekin hell that's a rough streak of luck and I feel sorry for you.



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02 Aug 2021, 11:21 am

 ! magz wrote:
Some posts have been removed.
WrongPlanet.net has rules against personal attacks and so called banter is interpreted as a form of them.
Remember that on an autism forum the default interpretation of text is literal.


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02 Aug 2021, 1:26 pm

Nades wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Nades wrote:
Out if interest, what happened to result in your homelessness? You're literally the first person I heard of to become homeless without injecting smack into their anal sphincter.
As I said, in my case, homelessness was the result of trusting the wrong people and feeling sorry for others -- like my ex-wife, who was a bipolar (unbeknownst to me) alcoholic (unbeknownst to me) with a drug-abuse problem of her own (unbeknownst to me).  I provided a few unsecured loans to someone else whose business had run into some turbulence.  He also had substance-abuse problems (unbeknownst to me).  He and my ex-wife began a "relationship" behind my back (also unbeknownst to me).  She then convinced him to use his new-found prosperity to finance her divorce from me, and his business connections to have me "laid off" from my employer.  In rapid order, I found myself jobless, homeless, penniless, and with a lot of debt I had not incurred.  I was stupid and naïve -- trusting and sympathizing too much.  Never again.  Never, ever again.
Damn. Yeah...that do it. The planets aligned, you got a hole in one and got struck by lightning simultaneously for that to happen and not on a good way. I'm seriously lacking in empathy on the best of days but holy fekin hell that's a rough streak of luck and I feel sorry for you.
Thanks!  No need to feel sorry, though.  It was my own damned fault for trying to be a Nice Guy™ to everyone.

Not only do Nice Guys™ finish last, but they get knocked down, trampled, kicked to the side of the road, and left for dead by the people they had once been nice to. 

The only thing that makes Nice Guys™ victims, however, is accepting their situations and not fighting back; and I am NOT a victim.

I am a survivor.



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02 Aug 2021, 1:50 pm

There are more empty homes in the U.S. than there are homeless people.

We could solve the problem if we wanted to, but we do not.


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02 Aug 2021, 2:01 pm

XFilesGeek wrote:
There are more empty homes in the U.S. than there are homeless people.  We could solve the problem if we wanted to, but we do not.
Yes; but something more must be done than to just take the plywood off the front doors and invite the homeless inside.  Many of these abandoned homes have already been relieved of their wiring, plumbing, and fixtures.  Several abandoned buildings (including a few former businesses) in my area have been "claimed" by squatters, only to burn down when cooking/heating fires were started inside.

It takes money to refurbish an abandoned home -- work that must be done to bring the building up to code and make it livable again.  I do not know about anyone else; but if I was going to refurbish abandoned homes, I would make certain that I have either trustworthy renters or well-monied buyers lined up beforehand.



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02 Aug 2021, 2:38 pm

Fnord wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
There are more empty homes in the U.S. than there are homeless people.  We could solve the problem if we wanted to, but we do not.
Yes; but something more must be done than to just take the plywood off the front doors and invite the homeless inside.  Many of these abandoned homes have already been relieved of their wiring, plumbing, and fixtures.  Several abandoned buildings (including a few former businesses) in my area have been "claimed" by squatters, only to burn down when cooking/heating fires were started inside.

It takes money to refurbish an abandoned home -- work that must be done to bring the building up to code and make it livable again.  I do not know about anyone else; but if I was going to refurbish abandoned homes, I would make certain that I have either trustworthy renters or well-monied buyers lined up beforehand.


Bare basic shipping containers is best. No heating capabilities and just a single lightbulb. Even a gang of addicts would have trouble destroying a steel box.



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02 Aug 2021, 3:46 pm

Fnord wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
There are more empty homes in the U.S. than there are homeless people.  We could solve the problem if we wanted to, but we do not.
Yes; but something more must be done than to just take the plywood off the front doors and invite the homeless inside.  Many of these abandoned homes have already been relieved of their wiring, plumbing, and fixtures.  Several abandoned buildings (including a few former businesses) in my area have been "claimed" by squatters, only to burn down when cooking/heating fires were started inside.

It takes money to refurbish an abandoned home -- work that must be done to bring the building up to code and make it livable again.  I do not know about anyone else; but if I was going to refurbish abandoned homes, I would make certain that I have either trustworthy renters or well-monied buyers lined up beforehand.


I'm not talking about junk houses. I'm talking about all the rental properties being horded by landlords in pursuit of profit.


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02 Aug 2021, 4:02 pm

XFilesGeek wrote:
[...] I'm talking about all the rental properties being horded by landlords in pursuit of profit.
"Hoarded"?  Do you mean when a landlord owns more than one rental property?

There is nothing wrong with that; after all, someone has to own them.  If someone else wants to own them, they they could just buy them from the original owner.



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02 Aug 2021, 4:04 pm

XFilesGeek wrote:
Fnord wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
There are more empty homes in the U.S. than there are homeless people.  We could solve the problem if we wanted to, but we do not.
Yes; but something more must be done than to just take the plywood off the front doors and invite the homeless inside.  Many of these abandoned homes have already been relieved of their wiring, plumbing, and fixtures.  Several abandoned buildings (including a few former businesses) in my area have been "claimed" by squatters, only to burn down when cooking/heating fires were started inside.

It takes money to refurbish an abandoned home -- work that must be done to bring the building up to code and make it livable again.  I do not know about anyone else; but if I was going to refurbish abandoned homes, I would make certain that I have either trustworthy renters or well-monied buyers lined up beforehand.


I'm not talking about junk houses. I'm talking about all the rental properties being horded by landlords in pursuit of profit.


Those houses are not empty though



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02 Aug 2021, 4:14 pm

Fnord wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
[...] I'm talking about all the rental properties being horded by landlords in pursuit of profit.
"Hoarded"?  Do you mean when a landlord owns more than one rental property?

There is nothing wrong with that; after all, someone has to own them.  If someone else wants to own them, they they could just buy them from the original owner.


I'm sure homeless people are able to simply cough up the cash to buy a property.


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02 Aug 2021, 4:18 pm

Nades wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
Fnord wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
There are more empty homes in the U.S. than there are homeless people.  We could solve the problem if we wanted to, but we do not.
Yes; but something more must be done than to just take the plywood off the front doors and invite the homeless inside.  Many of these abandoned homes have already been relieved of their wiring, plumbing, and fixtures.  Several abandoned buildings (including a few former businesses) in my area have been "claimed" by squatters, only to burn down when cooking/heating fires were started inside.

It takes money to refurbish an abandoned home -- work that must be done to bring the building up to code and make it livable again.  I do not know about anyone else; but if I was going to refurbish abandoned homes, I would make certain that I have either trustworthy renters or well-monied buyers lined up beforehand.


I'm not talking about junk houses. I'm talking about all the rental properties being horded by landlords in pursuit of profit.


Those houses are not empty though


Depends on what source you go buy.


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02 Aug 2021, 4:23 pm

XFilesGeek wrote:
Fnord wrote:
XFilesGeek wrote:
[...] I'm talking about all the rental properties being horded by landlords in pursuit of profit.
"Hoarded"?  Do you mean when a landlord owns more than one rental property?

There is nothing wrong with that; after all, someone has to own them.  If someone else wants to own them, they they could just buy them from the original owner.


I'm sure homeless people are able to simply cough up the cash to buy a property.


They don't have the cash, but the tax payer does and I'm sure many won't be happy spending 250k on a house for someone to love in who won't look after it.