Why I don't think there are "Xinjiang atrocities"?

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SkinnedWolf
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29 Mar 2022, 7:25 am

I am at odds with the CCP on many points of view, and I am not shy about exposing their mistakes. There are a number of threads I've been involved in before that attest to this. But I don't think the CCP's actions in Xinjiang can be called "atrocities".
I avoid using any CCP propaganda itself as evidence here. All my information comes from my own experience or from people who have different political views with the CCP. Unless necessary, this information was obtained before Xinjiang was accused of genocide.
This might be seen as a remarkable claim that would require a lot of evidence. I have not traveled in Xinjiang myself, nor can I use any propaganda, in which case much of the evidence would be indirect. Even if this doesn't convince you, it contains a lot of real information about Chinese society.

If you are interested in propaganda, you can watch the "Xinjiang Counter-Terrorism" series of documentaries. They have a full English translation. Even if you think the part of the interview is completely fake, you can see images of terrorist activities that are hard to fake and Uyghur victims injured in terrorist activities. It's hard to call this an anti-government uprising, it's an indiscriminate attack. I recommend anyone who is timid to skip these:
A https://www.bilibili.com/video/av78266046/ Bloody Warning,English narration
B https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Wf0MO6GnZ4 Bloody Warning


I am not Uyghur. I am a Tujia. The population of my ethnic group is not much smaller than that of the Uyghurs.
My identity comes from my mom, and my mom's identity comes from her grandma. None of them actually identified themselves as belonging to a particular ethnic group. I was born in the autonomous region of our nation, a mountainous area. At that time, only the most remote mountain villages actually preserved the customs of our nation.
Schools in our autonomous region teach us a series of national cultures from elementary school, including our festivals, customs, history, and various traditional dances. For me these are pretty tedious courses. But our generation thus has more national identity than previous generations.
I guess I'm an internationalist. I don't think ethnicity is something particularly worthy of emphasis. If you disagree with me on this issue, disregard some of the emotional leanings in my article. That's not the point.

In my mom's day, minorities could get cash subsidies. In my day, ethnic minorities living in agglomerations could get bonus points for further education. Some particularly impoverished ethnic areas have additional points, which can add up to an astonishing value. Major positions in the autonomous region can only be held by their own nationalities. There is a special admissions program open only to minorities.
In the past one-child policy, there have been some inhumane incidents. In a county in Shandong in 1991, the local government ruled that no children could be born within 100 days to curb the growth of the local population. This is one of many tragedies of the past. At the same time, two Tujia people have always been able to have two children. This restriction will be more relaxed for ethnic minorities with a wider cultural gap with the Han. The largest families today are from ethnic minorities. This is one of the reasons why the proportion of ethnic minorities in China's population has been rising.
Parents are free to decide that their children belong to either the father's or mother's ethnicity. For preferential treatment, they usually choose ethnic minorities.
In academia, minority cultural studies have been a steady stream of funded projects. The ethnic medicine of Tibetan, Mongolian, Uighur, Zhuang, Kazakh, Dai, and Hui nationalities is open as an undergraduate medical major in the university.
Chinese companies generally violate labor laws, and statutory holidays are ignored. But ethnic groups with large festivals such as the Hui will definitely get their special holidays.
It is considered taboo that the Han people do not respect the customs of ethnic minorities and have direct confrontation with ethnic minorities. This is called "destroying national unity".

I had met some Uighurs, but I have not communicated deeply with them myself.
"Moving China" is a commendation carried out by CCTV every year, and ten people are commended each time. Among them, the minority winners mainly refer to the Uighurs and Tibetans, whose proportions visibly exceed the population proportions of their ethnic groups. I think this is one of the most well-known manifestations of political correctness.
I have seen many Uighurs on my university list. Their names are easy to identify. Their names appear very frequently in lists of unfinished assignments. This may be because they have language difficulties and they use Uyghur textbooks in primary and secondary schools. Chinese is a second language for them. Teachers are said to be more lenient in letting them pass the exam.
When I was in elementary school, I liked to eat naan from Uyghur vendors on the street, and the price was very affordable. The Uyghur traders are not proficient in Chinese, but very friendly.
But starting around 2012, some special Uyghur traders appeared in many provinces. They use Uyghur or unskilled Mandarin, and sell a product known as "Xinjiang cut cake." When the customer intends to buy a little bit, he finds that the merchants cut it across the board, and the weight and price are far higher than psychological expectations. The most famous incident is that a piece of cut cake was asked for 160,000 yuan.
This kind of thing happens all over the country. There were many jokes that satirized the phenomenon at the time. At the same time, I never saw those Uyghur vendors who selling naan in my hometown.
I often eat at Hui noodle restaurants. But in 2016 in Huangpu District, Shanghai, a noodle restaurant owned by a Hui ethnic group was smashed by another group of Hui ethnic groups. Because the latter claimed that a halal noodle restaurant must not have another halal noodle restaurant within 400 meters. The police dare not confront them. Newly opened Hui noodle restaurants are forced to close.
It is taboo for the Han police to confront them head-on. Minorities who are always more "dangerous" in law enforcement are favored. None of these negative incidents of ethnic minorities will be officially reported.

When my friend was in middle school, a policeman who had participated in counter-terrorism in Xinjiang came to give a speech at their school. A teammate of that police officer was blown to pieces while picking up a black bag that had fallen on the street. He cried when he said this.
This is not an isolated case. A policeman of the same ethnicity as me went to Xinjiang to fight terrorism. The slogan of the terrorists was "kill the Han Chinese". He said he was a Tujia. The terrorists said they wanted to kill the Tujia, too. He did not go on to say what happened next.
On March 1, 2014, a terrorist activity occurred at the railway station in Kunming, Yunnan. The terrorists were armed with knives and go and kill anyone they see. A total of 31 people were killed and 141 injured. The terrorist incident shocked the nation because it took place in a densely populated area.
I read some propaganda, which claimed that China itself is full of various terrorist activities, and the terrorist forces in Xinjiang are only an isolated phenomenon.
My assessment is: “fake news”.The CCP records all murders. Disgruntled bus drivers pulling their cars into the river are big news across the country. We have never seen such mass deaths (at least outside Xinjiang).

But more terrorist activities were taking place within Xinjiang.
Xinjiang people are extremely afraid of terrorist attacks. A phenomenon known to frequent visitors to Xinjiang is known as the "Inexplicable Running Incident in Urumqi" (Urumqi is the capital of Xinjiang). Because people on the street mistook the quarrel between the two as another terrorist attack, and began to flee in large areas. This has happened more than once.

The details about Xinjiang are mainly from my friends. She is of Han nationality and was born in the Hui Autonomous Region. She is the most knowledgeable and respectful of minority customs I have ever met in college. She has many Hui Muslim friends in her hometown, and Hui Muslims have close contacts with Uyghur Muslims. Her father was a frequent trader in Xinjiang (he was an extreme anti-government).
My father traveled to Xinjiang in 2017. He said cities in southern Xinjiang have teams of heavily armed police every 50 meters.
According to my friend's father: Xinjiang police usually work in groups of three. Two Uighurs held riot gear and one Han held a gun. (In order to avoid physical conflict between the Han and Uighurs)


Counter-terrorism policy is divided into three areas.
A. Solve the employment of ordinary Uyghurs and prevent them from choosing to participate in terrorist activities when they are dissatisfied with the society.
The first is to provide Uyghurs with skills and Mandarin training. One argument is that they have independent schools, one is that they can volunteer for the education offered to B.
The government has invested heavily in financial support (and forced some private companies) to build new factories and industries in Xinjiang.
These factories are in compliance with labor laws. If the factories here are concentration camps, the factories in other parts of China are hell.

The factories here only recruit Uighurs. Many Uyghurs face discrimination in employment in many private companies due to the lack of Mandarin and labor skills for many Uighurs, as well as the fear of some Muslims and the need to provide extra meals for Muslims. The government is paying to create dedicated jobs for them.
I strongly believe that Uyghur men and women in these schools and factories need to live separately. Because any school and factory in China will keep men and women living separately. This is the abstinence culture of the Communist Party, and it is also the culture of gender segregation that China has always had. This is not some kind of sterilization against Uyghurs.

B. Forcibly education of Uighurs who involved in terrorist activities.
I also strongly believe that there will be CCP political lessons in it. From middle school to university in China, CCP politics is compulsory to learn and need to pass exams.
I don't know any terrorists,of course ,so I can't synthesize an objective information to describe this kind of Forcibly education activities.
I presume that the conditions here will shock the Western world.
However, China is a developing country, and many social security systems are not perfect.
The hospital where the psychiatrist I trust works takes on the job of helping the homeless mentally ill. According to him, China's shelter for homeless people is very imperfect, unable to shelter everyone at once, and the shelter conditions are not good. Most of the rescued homeless female mental patients were sent to him with more than one venereal disease.
Put more money into the education of terrorists and give terrorists better conditions than everyone else? I disagree.
If international attention is needed because they live the same life as other Chinese, just because the terrorists are Uyghurs?

C. There are more security checks for Uighurs. This is also reflected in the fact that it will be more difficult for them to leave the country.
I don't like this policy. This will indeed be controversial. This is very much in the style of the CCP, as they do on other issues. Every link of the official system is afraid of causing security accidents and leading to accountability, so the constraints will become stricter and stricter in the implementation.
But objectively, this brings security. There are plenty of traces of links with foreign terrorist groups in previous terrorist activities (hard to believe they independently invented means and symbols that are so similar to other terrorist groups).
This policy is not entirely directed against the Uighurs. Many Han Chinese from Xinjiang have complained online that they are being checked more when they travel in other area.

In China, political asylum immigration is already a gray industry. A few days ago, lawyer Li Jinjin<1>, a political asylum lawyer, was killed by his client Zhang Xiaoning. Because Zhang Xiaoning's story was made up imperfectly and failed to complete her political asylum, Li Jinjin refused to help her sue the intermediary.
Logically, this does not directly prove that anything claimed by asylum seekers is necessarily false.
But I do not recommend using their testimony as valid evidence.
<1>I know the news of this is different in the Western world, but I would like to say:
My mother's friend, Yefu from Tujia (you can search his wiki entry), was arrested as a political prisoner for helping people in the 1989 incident to leave the country. After his release from prison, he wrote stories of various political prisoners he met in prison as a writer and founded a publishing house. He is still free on the mainland, promoting his anti-government views and earning money from them.
What more serious "crime" would make so many people need political asylum more than Yefu?


Terrorists are not just looting property or opposing the government. They reap life.
They threaten not only other ethnic groups, but also the lives and property of the Uyghurs and Hui who disobey them.
In China, a lot of illegal activities will not be dealt with, but murders must be detected. The CCP values stability.
Terrorists cannot be allowed to freely commit murders and spread their ideas.
I thought "Let terrorists be educated" (and locating their itinerary after education) was a far more appropriate approach than "Throwing bombs on terrorists"?

I read about the genocide of Aboriginal cultures in Poland and Canada, and I find that the events in Xinjiang bear little resemblance to those events.
Banned from learning a language? No. Mandarin is commonly used in other parts of China. But Xinjiang (and national news for Xinjiang) is bilingual. All the Uighurs I have come into contact with in my life speak Uighur (although some of them have trouble with their unfluent Mandarin). A side-evidence with video: You can see a large number of Uyghur respondents who speak Uyghur or speak Mandarin very poorly in official anti-terrorism documentaries.
Destroy culture? No. In academic research, the cultural studies of ethnic minorities, especially Uyghurs or Tibetans, are too much to be tiresome. China's policy on the protection of intangible cultural heritage is to invest in feeding the inheritors and promoting their works, and there are many Uyghur crafts in these projects. The Uyghur education system has its own special Uyghur language textbooks to learn their own history and culture. There is side evidence for this: "The former director of the Xinjiang Education Department was arrested for violating the textbook preparation procedures and secretly adding the national emblem of the separatist forces to the Uyghur textbooks and promoting hatred between ethnic groups." They can't arrest a minister of education for a textbook that doesn't exist, that's a stupid way to make up a story.
Forced renunciation of Islam? No. Muslim ethnic groups are sometimes discriminated against when seeking employment in private businesses elsewhere because it is government-mandated to provide Muslims with halal versions of food when it comes to providing food at work. This has led many companies that did not have Muslims to avoid recruiting Muslims. All universities are required to have a halal version of the cafeteria. (Halal is the name Chinese Muslims refer to food that conforms to the Shariah, which usually means using kitchen utensils that have never been exposed to pork.) Most of the large national statutory festivals are from Islam, and no company dares to let Muslims not take holidays on these festivals (While other statutory holidays are not actually protected in China).
A phenomenon that has been criticized by many Chinese, known as "pan-halalization", has attracted public attention around 2018. Because all halal food needs to be taxed to the China Islamic Association, this is considered to be a manifestation of the excessive expansion of the power of the China Islamic Association. Major milk brands in China are all halal. In extreme cases, there were "Halal water", "Halal beer", "Halal lard" (why do Muslims need beer or lard?), all of which had photos circulating on social media at the time. And the words that I have difficulty verifying: "Halal shopping channel" and "Halal road". My real experience is: Most halal restaurants prohibit entry of foreign food, some seats are only for Muslims, these rules are written on their walls.
The following is the content of the dispute:
Free assembly is prohibited. true. The CCP prohibits all unauthorized gatherings. After the frequency of terrorist activities in Xinjiang has increased, local police will be more vigilant about illegal gatherings.
Track your whereabouts (or, according to the propaganda, "apartheid"). Not quite. I strongly believe they will use informational means (mainly high-density surveillance cameras and biometrics) to track the movements of educated ex-terrorists. For stability, the CCP attaches great importance to public security. China has a chain of surveillance cameras called the "Sky Eye System," which operates in all urban areas of the country to warn of violence and help arrest killers.

I don't think this can be called genocide unless you think that terrorists represent what the Uyghurs are all about. Uyghurs are like other ethnic groups, they are not a hive mind, not a specimen used to record culture or ethnicity. I had met some of them myself. They have a variety of ideals and concepts. Some people love their traditional culture, some people yearn for modernization, some people seek illegal benefits by virtue of the CCP’s preferential treatment of ethnic minorities, and some people choose or are unfortunately indoctrinated with terrorism. Why should an activity to fight terrorism and protect the lives of all people, especially the mostly peaceful Uyghurs in the area, be considered cultural genocide?
There are many human rights violations in China, some of which I hope will receive international attention. (I'll focus on some of the issues that have contributed to China's current miserable fertility rate in the next thread)
But I don't think Xinjiang or minority issues are in these events.

I don't think it's reasonable to rely on the testimony of political asylum seekers, but it's very reasonable to ask independent media to visit Xinjiang.
My attitude towards the CCP's propaganda is that "it can be used to collect details that are hard to fake"; my attitude towards the testimony of political asylum seekers is "a clumsy story made up for profit without valid information."
As far as I know, some foreign media and scholars have already visited Xinjiang, although I cannot guarantee that they have done so without any interference.

There are two problems behind this:
A. What kind of media is independent?
B. Because of the system, the CCP grassroots generally have a quirk of placing too much emphasis on stability and fearing all negative information. The grassroots fear being held accountable, and decisions to correct mistakes must be made by higher-level departments. If they are not prepared, they will not even let the higher education bureau leaders visit an ordinary school. This means that completely free access is less likely.

One theory holds that the Western world's attention to Xinjiang is to re-chaos Xinjiang, alienate China's relationship with Central Asian countries, and hinder China's "One Belt, One Road policy".
I don't make any comments on this theory.

My friend. She opposes the government on a range of specific policies. But she is not opposes Russia going to war with Ukraine.
I told her how inconsistent this was with international rules.
She said the "white-skin" (disparagingly) used shameless tactics against China, citing examples of disinformation campaigns against Xinjiang and sanctions on Uyghur products. She said they have been doing it in a way that is good for the country at the expense of China. She said that following the rules set by "civilization" will only make China perish in the face of "civilization".
I couldn't put together effective words to argue against her. So I'm trying to figure out what's going on in the world.
I got emotional.
I am sorry.


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magz
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29 Mar 2022, 10:12 am

What I understand about the story - correct me if I'm wrong:

1. Western and Chinese definitions of "terrorism" differ but some Uyghur groups fit both of these definitions (random mass attacks);
2. The Chinese government adresses it in ways within their own understanding of being civil;
3. Horrible situation in some facilities mirror general low standard of life in poorer parts of China;
4. Similarily, some policies Westerners find unthinkable - information control, state control on reproduction, ban on gatherings - apply to all the Chinese citizens;
5. There are ethnic tensions within China and, similarily to e.g. USA, they are delicate matter, largely taboo, with a lot of affirmative actions being made by governments to counter bias within the society;
6. Chinese secrecy and censorship may be more a cultural problem of unwilling to publicly admit and discuss problems, not necessarily a sign of ill will.

Is it correct?


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29 Mar 2022, 10:15 am

magz wrote:
What I understand about the story - correct me if I'm wrong:

1. Western and Chinese definitions of "terrorism" differ but some Uyghur groups fit both of these definitions (random mass attacks);
2. The Chinese government adresses it in ways within their own understanding of being civil;
3. Horrible situation in some facilities mirror general low standard of life in poorer parts of China;
4. Similarily, some policies Westerners find unthinkable - information control, state control on reproduction, ban on gatherings - apply to all the Chinese citizens;
5. There are ethnic tensions within China and, similarily to e.g. USA, they are delicate matter, largely taboo, with a lot of affirmative actions being made by governments to counter bias within the society;
6. Chinese secrecy and censorship may be more a cultural problem of unwilling to publicly admit and discuss problems, not necessarily a sign of ill will.

Is it correct?

Correct
Very precise summary.


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29 Mar 2022, 10:28 am

Thanks. It puts it in a perspective.
Similarily, I found Chinese communism "put in a perspective" when I learned that notorious famine occurences stopped in China only in the 1970s.

I wouldn't like to live in China but I regret we know so little of Chinese perspective - not government statements but how people actually see things. I met some Chinese scientists, gifted, hard working and ambicious people, but we didn't talk about society much.
Imagine that I was planning to go to a conference in Wuhan in 2020? :mrgreen: Well, things fell apart both on the conference and my career side.
Pity. I'd love to see China with my own eyes.


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29 Mar 2022, 11:21 am

Me too!

China is a lovely place with very varied scenery.



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29 Mar 2022, 11:22 am

magz wrote:
Similarily, I found Chinese communism "put in a perspective" when I learned that notorious famine occurences stopped in China only in the 1970s.

Yes. China was a very poor country not so long ago.
Most of the CCP's leadership was born in the 1960s and grew up in an era of material scarcity. Therefore, many of their ideas are very inconceivable to the masses and some grassroots members of the CCP.
They only care about how to solve the problem and don't consider people's psychological needs.

China is a country that is developing too fast. The distribution of wealth over time and geography is very uneven.This has caused the Chinese social concept to be very fragmented.


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magz
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29 Mar 2022, 11:35 am

SkinnedWolf wrote:
China is a country that is developing too fast. The distribution of wealth over time and geography is very uneven.This has caused the Chinese social concept to be very fragmented.
That's not just Chinese problem. The whole world struggles with things changing too fast.

In a way, I'm lucky here. Having grown up in 1990s Poland, my generation here is already adapted to working on well-being and trying to improve things despite lack of stability.


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29 Mar 2022, 11:44 am

I’m going to learn more about your ethnic group.

I understand you are there, and I’m not there.

I have no problem with Chinese people or any person living in China.

The Chinese government, and the people themselves, have done a lot to alleviate poverty. They seem to have done a good job with this.

I’ve seen videos of Urumchi. Seems like a normal city to me.

There are supposed to be “re-education camps” for Uyghurs. Perhaps it’s not their ethnicity they dislike. Perhaps it’s their political opinions? Perhaps they want Uyghurs to conform to main Chinese political philosophy?



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29 Mar 2022, 11:51 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
There are supposed to be “re-education camps” for Uyghurs. Perhaps it’s not their ethnicity they dislike. Perhaps it’s their political opinions? Perhaps they want Uyghurs to conform to main Chinese political philosophy?

“re-education camps”The official name in China is “Xinjiang Vocational Skills Teaching and Training Center”.

All chinese citizen, in name, must conform to the CCP's political philosophy.

All elementary school students join the Young Pioneers.
The vast majority of middle school students will join the Communist Youth League.
CCP-style "politics" is a compulsory subject in junior high school.
All college students must pass exams in two courses, "Principles of Marxism" and "Introduction to Mao Zedong" in order to graduate.(Except international students)

But only in name. There are still many opponents of the government active in China.
Just a formalism. This is their style.


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magz
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29 Mar 2022, 12:27 pm

Poles vividly hated these "formalities" back in the communist times.
Somehow, a right to self-expression is super important to us.


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29 Mar 2022, 1:20 pm

magz wrote:
Somehow, a right to self-expression is super important to us.

Consider that the last regime in China was the corrupt ROC.
The previous regime was the Qing Dynasty, which brutally oppressed the Han Chinese and controlled speech.
And all previous regimes used the Confucian philosophy of "rank and order" to rule the people.

Chinese people's tolerance for centralization is much stronger than the world average.


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29 Mar 2022, 1:54 pm

How far back does Chinese civilization go?

I believe the Shang Dynasty goes back to at least 3,500 years ago (1,500 BC/BCE).

I understand writing goes back to at least 3,000 BC/BCE.



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29 Mar 2022, 2:12 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
How far back does Chinese civilization go?

Chinese history is not my specialty.

The Shang Dynasty is an internationally recognized Chinese civilization. I'm not sure if the Xia Dynasty is now internationally recognized.
The Xia Dynasty (about 2070 BC-1600 BC) was the first hereditary dynasty recorded in Chinese history books.

Earlier relics come from the Hongshan culture.
The Hongshan Culture (about 4000 BC - 3000 BC) originated in the southwest of Northeast China.
Relevant cultural relics unearthed include the famous dragon-shaped jade products, known as "the first dragon in China".


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magz
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29 Mar 2022, 2:20 pm

SkinnedWolf wrote:
magz wrote:
Somehow, a right to self-expression is super important to us.

Consider that the last regime in China was the corrupt ROC.
The previous regime was the Qing Dynasty, which brutally oppressed the Han Chinese and controlled speech.
And all previous regimes used the Confucian philosophy of "rank and order" to rule the people.

Chinese people's tolerance for centralization is much stronger than the world average.
And Polish people probably have less such tolerance than the world average - we tend to organize bottom-up and expect our leaders not to disturb it too much :mrgreen:


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29 Mar 2022, 2:46 pm

magz wrote:
What I understand about the story - correct me if I'm wrong:

1. Western and Chinese definitions of "terrorism" differ but some Uyghur groups fit both of these definitions (random mass attacks);
2. The Chinese government adresses it in ways within their own understanding of being civil;
3. Horrible situation in some facilities mirror general low standard of life in poorer parts of China;
4. Similarily, some policies Westerners find unthinkable - information control, state control on reproduction, ban on gatherings - apply to all the Chinese citizens;
5. There are ethnic tensions within China and, similarily to e.g. USA, they are delicate matter, largely taboo, with a lot of affirmative actions being made by governments to counter bias within the society;
6. Chinese secrecy and censorship may be more a cultural problem of unwilling to publicly admit and discuss problems, not necessarily a sign of ill will.

Is it correct?


This is exactly what I understood from the aforementioned post. There is an extreme in China, between the dictator on top and the individuals who feed the machine with hard work at the very bottom. You’re allowed to work and take care of the essential needs and not much else. Living like you have no soul, no soul like the ones who forces people to live under such a regimen and believe that this a healthy way to have an happy life.



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29 Mar 2022, 2:51 pm

Fixxer wrote:
magz wrote:
What I understand about the story - correct me if I'm wrong:

1. Western and Chinese definitions of "terrorism" differ but some Uyghur groups fit both of these definitions (random mass attacks);
2. The Chinese government adresses it in ways within their own understanding of being civil;
3. Horrible situation in some facilities mirror general low standard of life in poorer parts of China;
4. Similarily, some policies Westerners find unthinkable - information control, state control on reproduction, ban on gatherings - apply to all the Chinese citizens;
5. There are ethnic tensions within China and, similarily to e.g. USA, they are delicate matter, largely taboo, with a lot of affirmative actions being made by governments to counter bias within the society;
6. Chinese secrecy and censorship may be more a cultural problem of unwilling to publicly admit and discuss problems, not necessarily a sign of ill will.

Is it correct?


This is exactly what I understood from the aforementioned post. There is an extreme in China, between the dictator on top and the individuals who feed the machine with hard work at the very bottom. You’re allowed to work and take care of the essential needs and not much else. Living like you have no soul, no soul like the ones who forces people to live under such a regimen and believe that this a healthy way to have an happy life.

If you read carefully, you will see that I am against most of these policies.
I just don't approve of what's happening in Xinjiang as a particular kind of racial atrocity.
I do not tolerate false propaganda being widely believed.

The Chinese government isn't good enough, but it's not that bad either.

At present, ordinary people in China are facing many new difficulties. A large number of people are dissatisfied with the government.
But that's what my next post will cover.


_________________
With the help of translation software.

Cover your eyes, if you like. It will serve no purpose.

You might expect to be able to crush them in your hand, into wolf-bone fragments.
Dance with me, funeralxempire. Into night's circle we fly, until the fire enjoys us.