Not knowing you have kidney problem?

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Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 7:43 am

Can you live without knowing you have problems with your kidneys for many years?

It's just that I told my ex pychologist who worked in the NHS back in 2018 how I was drinking lots of water but not urinating a lot. And she then commented "well maybe something is wrong with your kidneys". At the time I was measuring slightly overweight on the scales and a lot of that weight was caused by water.

Today I did an hour of fast walking and weight training to. I feel drowsy currently which can be a symptom of kidney problems but could also be a side effect of the medication I am on for anxiety/depression.



kraftiekortie
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10 May 2022, 8:29 am

You don't definitely have a "kidney problem."

You should go see a doctor and get a checkup. And have bloodwork and urinalysis done.

The results of routine bloodwork and urinalysis almost always reveals whether you have problems with your kidneys, liver, and whether or not you have high cholesterol or diabetes.



Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 9:33 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
You don't definitely have a "kidney problem."

You should go see a doctor and get a checkup. And have bloodwork and urinalysis done.

The results of routine bloodwork and urinalysis almost always reveals whether you have problems with your kidneys, liver, and whether or not you have high cholesterol or diabetes.



ok


Did you mention getting tested for liver problems because I drink beer on the weekends?



kraftiekortie
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10 May 2022, 9:52 am

No.

Assessing liver function is done at all routine exams.



Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 9:54 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
No.

Assessing liver function is done at all routine exams.



Ok but can you live with kidney issues for a long time without even knowing there is something wrong?



kraftiekortie
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10 May 2022, 10:05 am

Perhaps you could. But not necessarily.

The best thing to do is get a routine checkup.



Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 10:08 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Perhaps you could. But not necessarily.

The best thing to do is get a routine checkup.



I don't get in the UK why the NHS don't make routine checkups mandatory for some people.



kraftiekortie
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10 May 2022, 10:10 am

Because then that would be government interference in people's lives.

Make an appointment as soon as possible. There's probably a waiting list.



IsabellaLinton
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10 May 2022, 10:28 am

Jamesy wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
No.

Assessing liver function is done at all routine exams.



Ok but can you live with kidney issues for a long time without even knowing there is something wrong?



Yes. ^

Among other measures you'll have a GFR score which tells how well your kidneys are working.
Higher numbers are better.

I have CKD but I forget my number. I think it's around 50-55 but it fluctuates.
My daughter has permanent kidney damage and she's around 30-35, but she takes kidney medicine daily.
My mother is in her 80s and she is something like 20-25.

We don't really have symptoms. My mother gets really itchy. My daughter's symptoms are blocked by her meds but she used to get swelling in her hands and feet. My only symptom was that I was rushed into surgery because my kidney swelled up and stopped working (Hydronephrosis). If that hadn't happened, I wouldn't have known.

Image

I'm not saying you have kidney disease. I have no idea.
Go to your GP for testing. If something's wrong they'll send you to a Nephrologist.



Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 10:35 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
No.

Assessing liver function is done at all routine exams.



Ok but can you live with kidney issues for a long time without even knowing there is something wrong?



I am on meds for anxiety and depression.

Will I have to stop taking them if there's something wrong?
Yes. ^

Among other measures you'll have a GFR score which tells how well your kidneys are working.
Higher numbers are better.

I have CKD but I forget my number. I think it's around 50-55 but it fluctuates.
My daughter has permanent kidney damage and she's around 30-35, but she takes kidney medicine daily.
My mother is in her 80s and she is something like 20-25.

We don't really have symptoms. My mother gets really itchy. My daughter's symptoms are blocked by her meds but she used to get swelling in her hands and feet. My only symptom was that I was rushed into surgery because my kidney swelled up and stopped working (Hydronephrosis). If that hadn't happened, I wouldn't have known.

Image

I'm not saying you have kidney disease. I have no idea.
Go to your GP for testing. If something's wrong they'll send you to a Nephrologist.



IsabellaLinton
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10 May 2022, 10:39 am

She has a serious autoimmune disorder. Her immune system is overactive, meaning it attacks her body and organs thinking they shouldn't be there. It started by attacking her joints and bones. Now it's harming her kidneys. She may end up needing a transplant but for now she takes a special immunosuppressant so her body won't reject her kidneys.

No, you won't have to stop taking your medicines for anxiety or depression.



Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 11:31 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
She has a serious autoimmune disorder. Her immune system is overactive, meaning it attacks her body and organs thinking they shouldn't be there. It started by attacking her joints and bones. Now it's harming her kidneys. She may end up needing a transplant but for now she takes a special immunosuppressant so her body won't reject her kidneys.

No, you won't have to stop taking your medicines for anxiety or depression.



Okay thanks for the info



kraftiekortie
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10 May 2022, 11:38 am

You should really make that appointment. Don't delay.

It doesn't mean you "have anything." It's good to get a yearly checkup, anyway.



Trueno
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10 May 2022, 11:47 am

Jamesy wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
Perhaps you could. But not necessarily.

The best thing to do is get a routine checkup.



I don't get in the UK why the NHS don't make routine checkups mandatory for some people.


Funding, taking account of risk vs benefit. No point piling in huge amounts of money to set up a system for ailments that are relatively rare. Target the funds at where the risk lies… often age-related. When I turned 65 I triggered a whole load of tests and checkups.

And if course, there’s the issue of personal responsibility, if you have a problem see the doc.


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Jamesy
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10 May 2022, 11:48 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
You should really make that appointment. Don't delay.

It doesn't mean you "have anything." It's good to get a yearly checkup, anyway.



Ok