Soomething I've wondered about. Please answer if you can

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firemonkey
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17 May 2022, 5:54 am

Is it possible to have what I would call,for want of a better phrase, 'micro zone outs'? A possible alternative would be 'micro absence seizures'.
It 's a briefer but more frequently occurring version of an absence seizure. I've noticed with the human benchmark reaction time test I'll get what I would consider reasonable results for my age i.e. 250 ms interspersed every now and then with a 500+ ms result.

There's Coojjman's Slobrain test.

Quote:
This is a simple test for Mean Reaction Time (M.R.T.) and Reaction Time Standard Deviation (R.T.S.D., a measure of consistency in reaction speed). Both, R.T.S.D. even more than M.R.T., have a significant (though not high) negative correlation with "g", or general intelligence.
https://iq-tests-for-the-high-range.com/slobrain/

I can get what I consider to be very good R.T.S.D results for my age , alongside results that I would consider to be 'outliers' even when accounting for my age. These tests are measured in milliseconds. The gaps between OK and not so OK mean reaction time with Slobrain aren't as huge. However the effect is more noticeable.

The attempts taken individually don't necessarily indicate that the following is true-
Quote:
Correlation between the two SloBrain statistics

rmean reaction time × reaction time standard deviation = .74 (n = 36)

So, persons with shorter reaction times are significantly more consistent, have their reaction times closer together
. However comparing a set of quick vs slow M.R.T does show this to be the case.

I think, going off topic a bit,it's a good thing I've never driven on a main road!


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Jakki
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17 May 2022, 6:50 am

This is not something, I give much attention to . In my thought processing . Am usually too busy processing the thoughts to acknowledge the delay response. But clearly . I have noted it . Seems when you have a wider frame of
Stored reference material .( as in more densely packed neurodensity in your brain ) it might take longer to sift through revolent information to any particular topic . In Milliseconds ? As I age sometimes it does seem to take longer than milliseconds . :oops: . Hope I addressed this topic correctly .. ?


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firemonkey
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17 May 2022, 6:59 am

^ I didn't think of it like that. That doesn't mean you've addressed things incorrectly.


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ThisTimelessMoment
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17 May 2022, 7:14 am

I have not done any of those tests.
What happens to me is infrequent blank outs where I lose any idea of where I'm going or what I'm doing. It happens when I drive. Doesn't effect my driving, but I have to be prepared to relax and wait for the task based information to come back. This is usually in a few seconds. Less than ten.

This also happens when I am walking somewhere. It that case it's a bit more odd feeling as I seem to lose the sense of my body and for a brief moment almost dont know what to do with my arms and legs. It feels like an instant loss of all bodily knowledge of what the current plan is. It is so brief that nobody notices but internally it feels quite disturbing. I think in the walking case there is also a loss destination and purpose but the physical effect is abrupt enough that i only really notice that body effect and by the time I'm over it the rest of the information is coming back.
This has happened to me for years and I've never had any negative consequences. Except for occasionally missing a turning.
I've grown more relaxed with it over time and it really doesn't stress me out any more.
I'm not sure whether this is a neurodiversity thing or is more trauma and dissociation related. I lean towards thinking it's the latter.

Not sure if this is relevant. It doesn't have much to do with reactivity tests as far as I can see but it is what I immediately thought of from the first part of your post


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HeroOfHyrule
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17 May 2022, 7:19 am

I don't think I'm having seizures (though I guess I have a risk for those so I dunno), but my brain just takes very long to process things. My reaction time is always in the 400s-500s, and that's just for pressing a button on a computer. Processing more complex information takes longer. I think when I was IQ tested my processing scored relatively low.



firemonkey
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17 May 2022, 4:09 pm

An example of what I mean.

Image


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