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H_Taterz
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19 Jun 2022, 9:13 pm

I'm supposed to be learning Networking to take the Network+ certification but I CAN'T FOCUS.
Is anyone on this forum a network engineer, or has taken the Network+ cert?



enz
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19 Jun 2022, 9:34 pm

might be a good idea for practice questions to look them up in your book if you don't know the answer.



H_Taterz
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19 Jun 2022, 10:01 pm

This isn't about answering questions in books.


enz wrote:
might be a good idea for practice questions to look them up in your book if you don't know the answer.



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20 Jun 2022, 4:16 pm

H_Taterz wrote:
I'm supposed to be learning Networking to take the Network+ certification but I CAN'T FOCUS.
Is anyone on this forum a network engineer, or has taken the Network+ cert?

Took it December 2010, took Security+ 4 days later. It was lifetime without expiration before 2011. Really makes sense to do them together as the latter builds on the former. I crammed test-prep books from Amazon for 4 days, it's enough to score high 90s on the exam. Security+ satisfies the requirement for US DoD IT jobs.

For Network+ pretty much everything revolves around the 7-layer OSI model, I've seen it taught both top-down and bottom-up. Aside from remembering specific implementations it's quite logical in it's organization.

Honestly, the best way to study was during winter break when my family left the house to me for the holidays and I could cram the book all day long without distractions. I did it on the dinner table away from the computer to eliminate distractions, and I didn't have a smartphone back then. For this reason, I highly recommend a paper book to minimize computer distractions while you study.

Following the tests I got offered an internship at the testing center to teach tech seminars there... I already had a paid academic position at the university, so I didn't take it. Those certifications can look very good early in your career.

Here are the books I used (earlier editions for me) for these two exams:
https://www.amazon.com/CompTIA-Network- ... 260122387/
https://www.amazon.com/CompTIA-Security ... 260464008/


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H_Taterz
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20 Jun 2022, 4:51 pm

The OSI model is the part I'm having trouble with: why the OSI layers are important.
I've never been great with theory.
I guess where I'm struggling is understanding what's the practical purpose of the OSI layers?
Any explanation of the OSI model might lead to further understanding of it.

(I'm actually using Mike Myers' Udemy course to try and get a better grasp of it)



r00tb33r wrote:
Took it December 2010, took Security+ 4 days later. It was lifetime without expiration before 2011. Really makes sense to do them together as the latter builds on the former. I crammed test-prep books from Amazon for 4 days, it's enough to score high 90s on the exam. Security+ satisfies the requirement for US DoD IT jobs.

For Network+ pretty much everything revolves around the 7-layer OSI model, I've seen it taught both top-down and bottom-up. Aside from remembering specific implementations it's quite logical in it's organization.



r00tb33r
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20 Jun 2022, 6:30 pm

I don't know Meyer's Udemy presentation so can't say if he explains it well in that format or not. In the text he used common analogies that could help you understand encapsulation of packets by protocols as you go down the layers of the OSI model.

What's your background? Maybe I could find some examples or analogies that you might find more relatable.


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H_Taterz
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20 Jun 2022, 6:38 pm

Mike Meyers does a really good job at breaking things down, but I have issues with lectures and staying focused.
Eventually I'll have my "Eureka!" moment, but it takes some time mentally digesting things.
My background is meteorology, military, some civil law (family courts)... and I'm a casual gamer. And I've also studied psychology. I'm not sure how relatable any of those will be, but I appreciate you trying to find common ground/concepts that I understand!



r00tb33r wrote:
I don't know Meyer's Udemy presentation so can't say if he explains it well in that format or not. In the text he used common analogies that could help you understand encapsulation of packets by protocols as you go down the layers of the OSI model.
What's your background? Maybe I could find some examples or analogies that you might find more relatable.



r00tb33r
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29 Jun 2022, 4:42 pm

Hope it went well. I'm sure you're already done.

TBH, I've got meteorologists working at my company and I can't imagine them doing anything with that. I'm not sure there are many relatable analogies for that.

Image

So I'm sure you've figured out by now that the OSI model is not 100% perfect in terms of classification of protocols, for example originally HTTP was stateless but gained state with 1.1 specification upward so it occupies both Application layer and Session layer now. The Presentation layer is kind of junk, many are of the opinion it should have been eliminated. If you discard that you can build a mental picture of message encapsulation where as you move down the layers from Application layer down to Network layer the message gains additional enclosing data for protocols of each of those layers.
Probably the best analogy for that encapsulation are these:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matryoshka_doll
Where the inner doll is the payload for the protocol of the layer above, the smallest doll being the message of the Application layer protocol. In the classic HTTP example it would be HTTP->TCP->IP then on the other side IP->TCP->HTTP.

Let us know how your test went.


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Vasco
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01 Jul 2022, 5:41 am

Best of luck with your test!



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08 Jul 2022, 6:01 pm

One way I understand the 7 layer dip of OSI is to look at the RFCs for protocols that I know like HTTP or telnet or FTP or SSH and see which parts fit what layers of the dip.


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29 Jul 2022, 8:35 am

MTCNA here. Never had an issue understanding the OSI layer, but I'd say Network Chuck may have a good short-ish video on the topic free on youtube.



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30 Jul 2022, 8:49 am

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_over_Avian_Carriers

A silly (yet functional and practical) example of keeping choices for some layers while changing choices for others.

https://avinetworks.com/glossary/layer- ... balancing/

This covers Load Balancing. Understanding the Layers can help understand Load Balancers, and understanding Load Balancers can help to understand the Layers.


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