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Jay123
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06 Jul 2022, 11:46 pm

Being on the Spectrum, Disability Rights is an issue I care deeply about. I actually go on marches for the Issue. I have extreme dislike of Ableism. In my view your entitled to equal rights no matter your Race, Religious views, Gender, Sexual Orientation, or weather your disabled or not. What's your opinion of Disability Rights?



IsabellaLinton
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07 Jul 2022, 1:13 am

Exactly the same as yours.



temp1234
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07 Jul 2022, 2:19 am

I do believe in equality for all. The problem is the majority of the people don't agree with me on that, and yet they pretend to support equality. In order for equality to happen, all people have to die.



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07 Jul 2022, 2:22 am

Agree 100%



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07 Jul 2022, 8:27 am

When it comes to me, I try not to think about it, as I hate being a burden and helped by others.

When it comes to others, blessed are those that struggle and all that. Yes, equality for all, along with social support when needed. I'll help where I can, disabled family, for example.



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07 Jul 2022, 8:46 am

I do get irked about people having to change the English language slightly to include the small minority of transgender people (in other words to make them happy) but people with autism are still allowed to be treated terribly and discriminated against, even though there are probably more autistic people on this planet than there are people who think they're genderless.

There's debates now on teachers having to say "children" instead of "boys and girls", stuff like that. At work there are more men than women and the men always call us all "chaps" or "guys" or "lads", but I don't care and I'm not going to waste my energy demanding them to say "people" or whatever.

With how things are going in this society, in 50 years time we probably won't be allowed to say "people" any more in case it offends people who don't identify as a human. It's sometimes hard to live in a world with words that suit every single neurotype/sexuality/race, etc. Sometimes you've just got to not take words so seriously and move on with your life.

There are people like most autistics that get treated diabolically throughout their lives, and I mean treated disgustingly, and we've just got to accept that it's because we're a minority and that NTs aren't obliged to understand us, but then there's some of the genderless people whining about a pronoun that's been used for thousands of years and is harmless.


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Twilightprincess
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07 Jul 2022, 8:54 am

Joe90 wrote:
I do get irked about people having to change the English language slightly to include the small minority of transgender people (in other words to make them happy) but people with autism are still allowed to be treated terribly and discriminated against, even though there are probably more autistic people on this planet than there are people who think they're genderless.

There's debates now on teachers having to say "children" instead of "boys and girls", stuff like that. At work there are more men than women and the men always call us all "chaps" or "guys" or "lads", but I don't care and I'm not going to waste my energy demanding them to say "people" or whatever.

With how things are going in this society, in 50 years time we probably won't be allowed to say "people" any more in case it offends people who don't identify as a human. It's sometimes hard to live in a world with words that suit every single neurotype/sexuality/race, etc. Sometimes you've just got to not take words so seriously and move on with your life.

There are people like most autistics that get treated diabolically throughout their lives, and I mean treated disgustingly, and we've just got to accept that it's because we're a minority and that NTs aren't obliged to understand us, but then there's some of the genderless people whining about a pronoun that's been used for thousands of years and is harmless.


Using inclusive language is really not much of a burden. Being able to use “they” and “them” can even make things easier in specific grammatical contexts.

“People” is a gender neutral term and will not need tweaking.

It’s relatively easy to adjust one’s language to be more inclusive. It can be challenging (and expensive) to make other adjustments, though. Hopefully, there will continue to be more supports for people on the Spectrum.


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07 Jul 2022, 10:11 pm

I also believe in disability rights, 100%.


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08 Jul 2022, 9:07 am

Twilightprincess wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
I do get irked about people having to change the English language slightly to include the small minority of transgender people (in other words to make them happy) but people with autism are still allowed to be treated terribly and discriminated against, even though there are probably more autistic people on this planet than there are people who think they're genderless.

There's debates now on teachers having to say "children" instead of "boys and girls", stuff like that. At work there are more men than women and the men always call us all "chaps" or "guys" or "lads", but I don't care and I'm not going to waste my energy demanding them to say "people" or whatever.


Using inclusive language is really not much of a burden. Being able to use “they” and “them” can even make things easier in specific grammatical contexts.

“People” is a gender neutral term and will not need tweaking.

It’s relatively easy to adjust one’s language to be more inclusive. It can be challenging (and expensive) to make other adjustments, though. Hopefully, there will continue to be more supports for people on the Spectrum.


I'd assume her point was that it irks her how much attention the demands of gender minorities get in comparison to the problems of those on the autism spectrum. Yes, changing people's ways of thinking about autism and people on autism spectrum is far more complicated than teaching people to say people instead of girls and boys or they/them instead of him/her, but most people aren't even trying to think how the world could be better for us too and act on it.

Of course, us on the spectrum are partly to blame for that; if we made as much noise about our rights as sexual- and gender minorities make about theirs, there'd certainly be much more talk about our rights, too, or so I'd assume.

...Does the autism spectrum have a flag of it's own? If not, anyone up for making one?



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08 Jul 2022, 3:05 pm

Quote:
I'd assume her point was that it irks her how much attention the demands of gender minorities get in comparison to the problems of those on the autism spectrum


Yes, that was what I was trying to say.

Usually when I complain about how we're treated in society, the answer here is always "it's because we're a minority, and the world has always only been catered for the majority". But genderless people are also a minority but the world now has to make them happy by altering what we can and can't say.

Quote:
Of course, us on the spectrum are partly to blame for that; if we made as much noise about our rights as sexual- and gender minorities make about theirs, there'd certainly be much more talk about our rights, too, or so I'd assume.

I have heard of autistic people attending protests and doing TV shows based on autism and lots of other things like that, but society still seems to be in the dark ages when it comes to autism. It'd be nice to live in a world where it's 'politically incorrect' to discriminate against autism or even bully them for being autistic.

Quote:
...Does the autism spectrum have a flag of it's own? If not, anyone up for making one?


No aliens though. I hate Aspies associating autism with aliens. We need to get the world to know that we are humans too!


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Texasmoneyman300
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10 Jul 2022, 5:51 am

Jay123 wrote:
Being on the Spectrum, Disability Rights is an issue I care deeply about. I actually go on marches for the Issue. I have extreme dislike of Ableism. In my view your entitled to equal rights no matter your Race, Religious views, Gender, Sexual Orientation, or weather your disabled or not. What's your opinion of Disability Rights?

Obviously I believe in disability rights but my parents are very ableist.they say I am "playing the autism card" or "You cant have it both ways" when i stand up for my rights as a disabled autistic person.They dont even believe I am disabled.Its so annoying.So I subjected to ableism pretty much every day.They did not even think I had the right to a college education with accomadtions.



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10 Jul 2022, 6:34 am

Texasmoneyman300 wrote:
Jay123 wrote:
Being on the Spectrum, Disability Rights is an issue I care deeply about. I actually go on marches for the Issue. I have extreme dislike of Ableism. In my view your entitled to equal rights no matter your Race, Religious views, Gender, Sexual Orientation, or weather your disabled or not. What's your opinion of Disability Rights?

Obviously I believe in disability rights but my parents are very ableist.they say I am "playing the autism card" or "You cant have it both ways" when i stand up for my rights as a disabled autistic person.They dont even believe I am disabled.Its so annoying.So I subjected to ableism pretty much every day.They did not even think I had the right to a college education with accomadtions.


well thats why autism is best called a disability instead of a difference


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Texasmoneyman300
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10 Jul 2022, 9:59 am

Caz72 wrote:
Texasmoneyman300 wrote:
Jay123 wrote:
Being on the Spectrum, Disability Rights is an issue I care deeply about. I actually go on marches for the Issue. I have extreme dislike of Ableism. In my view your entitled to equal rights no matter your Race, Religious views, Gender, Sexual Orientation, or weather your disabled or not. What's your opinion of Disability Rights?

Obviously I believe in disability rights but my parents are very ableist.they say I am "playing the autism card" or "You cant have it both ways" when i stand up for my rights as a disabled autistic person.They dont even believe I am disabled.Its so annoying.So I subjected to ableism pretty much every day.They did not even think I had the right to a college education with accomadtions.


well thats why autism is best called a disability instead of a difference

Good point.I wish my parents saw it that where my autism was a disablity and not a difference.



klanka
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10 Jul 2022, 10:53 am

Funnily enough I was just thinking this morning that it's a disability.

How can the government help someone whose disability is to make it hard to form relationships? Aspie groups where they meet irl are good.



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11 Jul 2022, 4:41 am

klanka wrote:
How can the government help someone whose disability is to make it hard to form relationships? Aspie groups where they meet irl are good.


It's a lot more than that. Having trouble socializing means trouble with forming connections, and in today's world trouble forming connections often means trouble getting jobs. How government could help could be spreading the info that even if a person can't butter up the right people at right time, they can do the jobs they've been educated for. Or something similiar.



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11 Jul 2022, 7:07 am

That sounds like a good idea. It seems like people with asd had just been left to navigate life with hardly any help despite having a recognised disability for a long time. I dont know what its like now for those who have a diagnosis.
I havent been diagnosed yet.

I was trying to just rely on God for the way forward...something happened to me recently which might indicate something is going to happen but I dont like to say and try to predict what is going to happen.