What are some signs you are moderately autistic

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orbweaver
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12 Jul 2022, 2:51 pm

I obvs haven't seen a lot of the show, but are we sure that Kaelynn is ".5" and not just high masking?

Are we sure Dani is "passing that well" or are we just missing the tells because 1) she's an artist type and 2) "quirky girls" are in fashion now?

Here's why I ask.

I presented a lot like Dani in my 20s (am a Los Angeles Jew, and was an art/design major, so we have a lot in common) - and it gave me hell because it "did not pass as normal" like it does now. IT WAS A BIG PROBLEM. It was not okay to be a "quirky girl" in the 1990s except perhaps unless you *were* an artist type or something who had rich parents. It wasn't as normed as it is today. I went through hell trying to stop seeming "quirky." (Nobody said quirky. They just said WEIRD.) A woman who presents like Dani would've come off very differently in the 1990s. Also - IMO, yes she has autism tells; she has very clumsy movements (see her get in and out of chairs? It reminded me of me. Can't tell you how often I've knocked a chair over trying to sit down or get up.)

She can pass as a "quirky girl" especially being an animator. I wonder how well she really is doing in her career etc or if she's just had a lot of supports/family help, so her problems are more invisible than mine have been, tbh. I gather she must be from a very privileged family.

Even being a quirky girl like Dani was not an option for me when I was her age (in the early 90s) and I absolutely had to have the right persona to hold down work, etc. I definitely "fell in love" way too quickly with people, it was especially bad once I started wanting a spouse, but knew not to say anything about it. They could tell anyway and got freaked. It only really worked with other ND people.

So I transformed my public image from being a Dani, to being more like a Kaelynn, for several years. (Sometimes I wonder how much is autism presentation vs how much is culture - Dani has soooooooooo much Yiddishkeit omg and I feel like a lot of my "high masking period" was actually about trying to learn to pass specifically as WASP now that I no longer lived in LA and now that I have ZERO Jewish support system, idk if I was trying to seem less autistic or just trying to seem less "Jewy.")

(My dx was specifically Asperger's, and it can present in my case like ADHD, and more of my problems at this point are executive function related. I have social problems but a chunk of my professional life is based online and I'm very very good at curating my image so that people at a casual level of contact with me, do not see my social problems.)

Finally:

re: Level 1 autistics: I feel like I've known a few Level 1 presenting people now whose primary problem was social, who experienced relatively little sensory stuff that would present beyond "picky/idiosyncratic personal preferences" (which are common among NTs as well; for example, not liking crowds or your eyes being sensitive to sunlight/bright lights, or having specific food preferences, mean very little on their own without the rest of the autism picture there).
These people are late diagnosed and their early diagnosis was ADHD. Some of them just come off like rude, loud normies (and there are lots of rude, loud normies). Some of them come off like nerdy normies with social anxiety.

The person I knew who would probably be considered Level 2 while we were together, that being my ex, couldn't even socialize well with the Aspie types I was friends with, couldn't hold a job without having a mental health breakdown,
and had very different ideas about what constitutes autism vs what doesn't, than my Aspie friends did. His emotional regulation was much, much worse than mine.

Also, re: Dani:

With regard to being an artist type - compare Sam in the last season of Atypical to previously in the show; isn't it interesting how, in the context of being an art student, a lot of his autistic optic kind of fades away, because he doesn't really stand out among other artists?


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12 Jul 2022, 7:21 pm

I'm moderate, not mild. For me that plays out in a lot of ways. I can't work (though I could before my last major burnout). At this point in life, having to commit to doing something outside of my house regularly and then doing it...eh, that would lead to another burnout for me and likely another stay in a psych hospital. I cope poorly with responsibility, pressure, stress, most things really. As a result, I am on disability. That's one support I need. I do go out in public alone sometimes, but I prefer not to. When I do go out, I have a note I carry in my hand that has some basic info on it should i have a shutdown in public. This has happened to me enough for it to be a concern. My sensory issues are real and problematic...sometimes I cannot communicate this is a problem until it's too late and I'm something like catatonic. God help me is my car needs repair or some other form of adulting. It'll take me a week or two to be able to make a call to get whatever fixed, if I even manage to make that call. I ignore a lot of problems because they overwhelm me and I shut down if I think about them. I suck at emotions and when I do have them, I shut down or fail to understand them. I suck at change and when it happens, I freak out. Most of my time is spent preparing for things I have to do or want to do so I can do them then I need time to recover from those things. My life is exhausting in a lot of ways. Still, I try my best to live it on my terms and do things that bring me some okay in the middle of the rest of the mess. Most messed up part, when I'm on top of my stuff, I seem okay. Hell, I might say I am okay. But as soon as one tiny hiccup comes along, my whole world spins off its axis. I'm sure there's more, but that's what I've got at the moment. Point being, for me, being moderate doesn't mean I don't seem okay/nt/whatever at least some of the time (because I can and I do and it's bizarre), but when I'm not, I'm really not. And it doesn't take much to get me to not really okay.



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12 Jul 2022, 8:23 pm

I think I'm closer to being on the "moderate" part of the spectrum.

People usually notice that something is "wrong" or "delayed" about me, but don't always pinpoint it as being due to autism since I can be relatively articulate and I actively try to socialize + control my "odd" behaviours. I still am never sure what to do when interacting with others though, even if they're someone I talk to a lot or if it's a social situation that I've experienced a lot, so I am noticeably very awkward + sometimes avoidant of interacting.

I have a small amount of tolerance for socializing and can only truly handle having a few minor interactions with others in a day without becoming exhausted, and usually get bored and want to exit interactions after just a few minutes, even with people I like talking to.

I have noticeable sensory issues and have to take a lot of measures to keep them under control + avoid sensory overload. I get sensory overload a lot and have shutdowns often due to it.

I am relatively independent and am able to care for myself, and have a job (though I don't know if I would have been able to keep it if my aunt didn't work with me + helped me get it). I don't go places by myself that often though, since I get overwhelmed and overstimulated really easily, so I still rely on others to go in public.

I rely heavily on routines and things occurring in predictable ways, so I get really stressed out if routines change or something happens that I don't expect. Sometimes those things make me shutdown if I don't get help from other people to manage them, since I don't know how to handle them.



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13 Jul 2022, 4:43 pm

Thinking on this, it's interesting to me to think about my ASD-1 friends and myself and think about where we are all at.

The thing is:

I am not even sure I could tell who is ASD-1 from ASD-2 without being the clinician looking at any of these people. The person I was with who was probably ASD-2 (ex partner, not on this list) while we were together, didn't have fundamentally different presentation or different problems from my best friend, who was given the actual diagnosis of ASD-1. In some non-social functioning ways that ex was *less* impaired than my best friend (and is another case of someone who "passes less socially but is more impaired in other ways.") Both have in common though that they were never able to hold a full time job without ending up with a severe mental health crisis after about a month. In common between my unlisted ex partner and my best friend, they are both trans, and both experienced a sharp jump in functioning after beginning transition, which is very interesting to me! Both related to aspects of their pre-transition trans experience as being a heavier burden of masking; ex actually managed to become a therapist after transitioning.

The big difference I see in function is that some of us have invisible supports or - in the case of one of us - are able to make enough money to just transact a lot of support (if you can afford to buy pre-cooked meals every night, you don't need to cook or wash dishes, for example.) I think a big thing with lots of seemingly highly functional ND advocate types is that they're rich enough to have healthy support networks or to be able to just transact their supports. Their wealth makes it almost impossible to see how impaired they might really be, so they look like these people flitting about and living their lives. I feel also like you have to distinguish the socially isolating parts of autism from the socially isolating parts of poverty. Because poverty is the main thing isolating some of the more socially adept people I know.

So these are the people I know who are ASD-1 and all are somewhat impaired:

One, a woman who is a non-masker, is on disability and her *only* big presenting social issues, are being rude/inappropriate/unpresentable/openly argumentative, but it's kept her from being able to work. She has some quirky/odd things about her and has trouble taking the bus/walking long distances because of dyspraxia, especially if she has to carry stuff. But she has lived alone for most of her adult life with very few supports (aside from needing someone to go with her if she goes to the store, because of being unable to walk and carry things). She is both extroverted and very socially impaired, is not a high self monitor at all, and is just kind of in her own oblivious bubble out in public and will talk to whomever. But she requires very few supports at home and manages her life for the most part, with financial help.

Her social mistakes usually happen right away and she's a very polarizing person (a "love me or hate me" kind of person.) However I will also say she is one of the BEST and most decent and honest people I have ever known in my entire life, is extremely reliable, and never flakes at the last minute, ever. I don't know what her "mask slipping" would look like, she's just herself out in public. She is the one person I'm mentioning here who's on disability and she is the least functionally impaired of them in terms of non-social types of impairments, but was also the first to get a diagnosis. She is also highly literal and doesn't get some common expressions, and doesn't get ANY unspoken social cues. But apart from the dyspraxia and her social issues, she is able to live on her own and run her own life with the resources she's been provided, which isn't true of the rest of us (most of us have somewhat higher support needs than she does). And - she's also funny and witty. She just doesn't get YOUR jokes, unless you have a similar sense of humor. Which I do. She can be an incredibly fun person to be around, though I get worn out after a while.

A different person - my best friend of 25 years - is socially quite adept on the surface, but requires a lot of hidden supports most people would never guess at, and runs into glitchy things in her friendships and relationships that cause problems down the road. She is very, very unable to confront people or manage conflict (which is as much because of being dependent upon others, as anything). She is extremely polite and well-mannered and well spoken, and is a very, very good judge of character. She has strong empathy and uses it to navigate social situations. But as of her late 40s, she has never been able to hold down a job or complete even a single school class due to invisible disabilities (autism related as well as common autism comorbids) that are *not* related to social deficits - mix of mood related stuff, executive function, and non-24 circadian rhythm disturbance. She possesses a lot of empathy and can easily put herself "into another person's shoes." She is the least autistic-seeming of our whole social world that seems to be mostly autistic people, and doesn't have strong sensory problems. She struggles with social stuff because of flaking on people a lot, having higher support needs than her friends can handle, etc. But not because of issues related to social intelligence or missed cues.
Nobody ever took her for autistic. After all this time knowing her - even as I've successfully guessed it in other people - I never pinned it down, either. She comes across very socially practiced, polite, and highly educated. But the requiring a lot of hidden supports, catches people by surprise, and if you don't know that you're having to navigate that she has all of these very hidden disabilities, you may end up wondering why this perfectly composed and well-behaved person is such a flake. Her "mask slipping" can look like a sudden, abrupt withdrawal or loss of interest or pulling away that you never anticipated, or suddenly dropping out of a group or game without warning, after an extended period of interaction - she tends to socialize in sprints. She is socially adept, and aware of a ton of social dynamics, and educated *me* about many of them. Has a ton of disabling deficits that are not obvious to people at first glance and have relatively little to do with how well she presents socially. She is not literal. She gets lots of cues. She could TEACH people about social stuff, in some cases.

Then there is my ex husband, non-diagnosed, of whom I've suspected autism pretty much since I found out about my own autism, though he is the case of an autist who can be difficult to distinguish from a "cerebral" style narcissist. He is a classic Little Professor, but puts on a mask of being amiable. He ended up with my entire friend group (even and especially the autists, who saw through him right away) hating him by the time we split up. He has no friends. I actually think of him when I think of masking because he is a bit of a phony - is very smiley and fawny and mirrory and Nice Guy until he isn't able to mask anymore for the day or he's decided he doesn't like you anyway and doesn't need to impress you, and the real him comes out (who actually has disdain for most people). He performed well at work and was well liked and depended upon there. He managed to live on his own his entire adult life and travel the world. But he has a ton of severe, invisible deficits that are only noticeable in a domestic situation with him, and which require a lot of hidden supports. (If you are his wife, you are basically his caregiver.) He is deeply impaired with C-PTSD type presentation, severe sensory issues and meltdowns (this usually came up during the weekends and didn't present at work), and executive function problems. He is actually very emotionally labile and *intensely* emotional and one of the types of autists who would experience themselves as deeply empathic, while not being seen as empathic by others. He is very easily offended and very easily triggered (and it's impossible to keep up with what all triggers him). He comes off as someone who doesn't laugh at your jokes not because he doesn't get them but because it means your jokes are just dumb. He judges people for being into normie humor and thinks of himself as smarter and more erudite than most people. He only wants to be friends with "the right" people and doesn't care if some "dumb jock" normie gives him a hard time because he thinks he's better than the normie. He hasn't presented for diagnosis because he doesn't think anything is actually wrong with him, everyone else is just stupid. Due to generational dynamics (older Gen X), he grew up just being thought of as highly gifted. He isn't literal, he basically talks in poetic expressions and lots of vague information and gets impatient when you can't keep up, and has minor meltdowns or shutdowns when forced to speak more directly or literally.

Then there's me. I think I am the most like Dani, but as a middle aged adult who "learned better" about saying some things out loud. But she's just like my 23 year old self! Like Dani, it possibly doesn't come off as an autism optic because I work in a similar field and present myself as artsy. I get into chairs like she does and struggle not to knock them over when sitting or standing, which is embarrassing. I think I am a bit of a masker, because I act differently around people I have to be on Good Behavior around, vs people I'm comfortable around. I aggressively have to keep my friends and social circles separate because I'm not the same person around all of them, especially if some of them are people I professionally network with.

I didn't take hints in my 20s, and often "said the unspoken part out loud." But I got better, because of making "social stuff" (interpersonal psychology, social psychology, anthropology, etc) my special interest for so long. Because my dysregulation has presented as health issues for *years* and I show very little emotion, including when I'm in distress, I pass as "mentally healthy" to people, let alone non-autistic - my needing to leave a noisy room comes off like a middle aged migraine sufferer (which I am) and not an autist. When I was younger, I seemed weird/quirky, but nobody I knew in my teens - except for the other autists - whom I told about my later diagnosis, believed it to be correct. I have whole periods of my life (usually when I've got invisible supports in place) where I seem socially normal, and people outside of my house just don't really see my impairments. I live life basically peering through a keyhole - standing at a distance, observing, reading, studying, but almost never directly engaging. I am not literal. I am not easily offended. I am also not easily moved or triggered. I am competent at my work but struggle with executive function problems, getting started, etc, but it believably passes as "someone with bad ADHD" to most people who don't know I'm autistic.

I struggle with attention, processing, and cognitive overload issues in group situations that make me look either rude (when I'm actively participating) or deeply withdrawn (when I'm not) and there's literally just no way for me to engage a group situation, except to try to avoid any upon which my life/livelihood could depend (work is going better with WFH). I experience these issues even in groups where I don't have to be "on good behavior." I have episodes of mutism sometimes if I'm pushed into a social situation and *forced* to talk/give a presentation. I have executive function issues that heavily resemble a bad case of ADHD. I have never passed as neurotypical, but when I insisted I "just had ADHD," people accepted that and moved on. It looks weirdly selective because I do SO WELL at topics I'm knowledgeable about or for example, my work.

Of *all* of the people I know, whom I've mentioned - I'm the *only* one that has food issues, restricted interests, rigidity, same-sameyness, heavy stimming, spacing out in public, etc. And I am also one of the least socially impaired of them, and one of the two most emotionally regulated. I am not literal - like, at all, I use a ton of metaphors and similes and "read between the lines" in speech with no problem. I am not a black and white thinker.

Still and all - if you are not actually inside my house and inside my head, you may not at all see my deficits. It's not even necessarily ALWAYS masking, I'm just not impaired in those same ways. It's why I'm not quick to jump to assuming that a comparatively socially skilled autist like Kaelynn or Dani isn't necessarily impaired in some way we can't see.

It is interesting to me that some of the most socially skilled, "passing" autistics I know, have invisible impairments and either have or require invisible supports, and are more deeply impaired than most people guess. In fact, it's the very most socially skilled autists of the ones I mentioned (including myself), that have the most problems just living on their own and going about their business. But it's the most socially impaired ones (such as the first example, and my ex-husband) who seem to have successfully lived on their own.

In my ex-husband's case, though, I really feel that it's only because he's a male who works in computers and without being *both* of those things together, he wouldn't be able to have enough money to survive on his own, given that the money he made allowed him to make up for a ton of deficits. He didn't have to cook for himself, and because of being a man - his disorganization and sloppiness were a lot more accepted, etc. Mind you, I am talking about a different generation (older X) and I think things are changing with younger people and their gender dynamics are very different.

Some of these people have relationship histories and friend groups. But the LEAST socially skilled autist I know - someone who gets kicked out of every group she joins, and never seems to learn better social technique, and isn't interested in doing so, you simply like her or you don't and you take her as she is - is also the most emotionally stable, the least impaired in her day to day functioning life, and requires fewer supports than the people who *are* socially functioning. That is fascinating to me.

I am not even sure I know anyone who is "moderate" and the fact that I met my other autistic friends at social events in public, tends to filter for autistic people who like going to social events in public.

BTW - ALL of us have a previous diagnosis of ADHD, it's just a common generational experience for late diagnosed Gen X autists as autism was almost never diagnosed in anyone who did not fit a particular clinical picture of autism, while practically everything could get called ADHD.


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14 Jul 2022, 8:44 am

The "autism level 2?" thread has a graphic...


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14 Jul 2022, 11:56 pm

Muse933277 wrote:
James from Love On The Spectrum US in my opinion is Level 2 Autistic, or otherwise known as moderately autistic.






I would say Subodh (who's also on the show) is level 2.5. It's clear that he's autistic and may have some intellectual challenges, but he's still able to communicate verbally and do some things on his own.






Abbey is anywhere from level 1 to 1.5. She's able to communicate effectively but may have some apparent but minor social difficulties and maybe some difficulties with living independently (for now). She doesn't come off as immediately autistic to the general population (professionals may be able to tell) but she may come off as a bit awkward.







Dani is level 1. She's able to communicate effectively, doesn't have any odd or awkward demeanor that would give away her autism, and has shown that she's smart and capable of holding down a job. However, it's clear that she has some social deficits if you really pay attention. Being too honest and blunt, and falling for people too fast, are just some examples.







Kaelynn in my opinion is level 0.5, and is probably the most mildly autistic person on the show so far. Like Dani, she's capable of communicating effectively, doesn't have an odd demeanor or mannerism that would give her away being autistic, and she appears to be highly intelligent and capable of functioning really well. She lives on her own, can hold down a full time job, and appears to have friends. I would say she's more socially skilled than Dani is as well. She can easily pass off as neurotypical and her autism is more of an identity than a serious disorder.



This is not accurate. I would bet money that Abby is a level 2, and Kaelynn could possibly be a level 1.. but there is no 0.5. We also can’t see these individuals difficulties outside of the show.. so, you can’t accurately rate their autism levels. Especially since I don’t believe you’re trained to. Abby is moderately autistic, and Dani and Kaelynn but have obvious symptoms of autism.



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15 Jul 2022, 1:56 am

OK, here are examples of 3 different individuals on the spectrum, and although not every autistic person is the same, these are still scenarios in which anyone would use the term mild, moderate or severe to describe them.

1. Sally was diagnosed with autism at age 3. She was noticeably delayed with speech and other important milestones. She went to a special school. As an adult she can speak but only repetitively and has echolalia, and is non-verbal when upset, overwhelmed or having a meltdown. She's unable to communicate her feelings or have any sort of conversation with anyone. She wears ear defenders most of the time and rocks and flaps her hands a lot. She spends 3 days a week in care to give her parents a break, and is unable to work or be independent. Although not all severe autistic individuals are like her, calling her severe or low-functioning is rather accurate.

2. Craig was diagnosed with autism at age 5. He had speech delays but started speaking at the age of 4. Due to his high intelligence he went to mainstream school at first but was bullied too much and also found being in a classroom of 30 children stressful, so he went to a special school from age 9 to 18. As an adult he lives alone in an apartment, and gets financial support from social services. He's had a part-time job before but due to his communication difficulties he couldn't stick at it, and he now receives disability benefit and doesn't have a job. But despite his communication difficulties he's still social and belongs to a Mencap group for adults with neurodevelopmental disabilities, and has a lot of friends that have downs syndrome or intellectual disability or autism, etc. Not all moderate individuals are the same as him but it still makes sense to call him moderate if you were to describe his functioning/severity.

3. Joe was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome at age 15. He reached all his milestones at the average times and attended mainstream school. His difficulties went unnoticed at school and because he could mask so well the teachers thought he was just shy and nervous. He had some friends at school but was bullied at high school and was sometimes lonely. At the age of 28 he lives with his parents but has a full-time job, can drive a car and even has a girlfriend. He loves music and films and knows almost every film that has ever existed. If you had a conversation with him you probably wouldn't guess that he's autistic, as he makes normal eye contact and can follow a conversation like a normal NT. He can sometimes get in tempers which involves slamming doors, shouting, crying and even threatening to commit suicide, even though he isn't depressed. Not all mild Aspies are the same but he is still someone you'd probably refer to as mild/high-functioning. Another Aspie can be different in every way to him but still be mild/high-functioning.

So that is my two cents anyway on the subject of autism severity across the spectrum. So just look at these as templates. Severity does exist.


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15 Jul 2022, 2:07 am

skibum wrote:
The Autism severity rating is a tool to help providers figure out what support systems a person will need. That is its function.


They should have an Autism Level 0 - Needs Ignored category :P

Honestly, I don't really get why they even specify "needs support." I'm Level 1 and I've never had support in my life, when needed or not.



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15 Jul 2022, 4:35 am

This is a very helpful thread. I was diagnosed at Level 1, so as far as I know, I appear to be 'normal' (whatever that is) except when something unexpected crops up, or I'm physically struggling with tiredness, hunger etc. and likely to get angry/upset. Then I do not appear 'normal' at all.

Sensory problems: I can't stand loud noise or much noise at all, I need absolute quiet most of the time. To the point where I don't like music and don't listen to it. Music is too repetitive and annoying. This is apparently so weird that no one can understand it and makes me an outcast. I can't stand extremes of heat or cold, too bright lights or strong smells. I don't like shopping malls, they are too loud and bright.

It occurred to me that I have never lived on my own. I lived with my mum, then went to university (which didn't go well), now live with my husband, who is a nurse, so takes good care of me. So I don't know if I could live alone! I doubt it.

I have had a lot of full time jobs, but often had meltdowns in them because of bullying or pressure of work. I have been a stay at home mum since 2005 which has been very lonely as I wasn't able to make many mum friends, presumably because I seem weird or whatever, I don't know.

I find it hard to tell who is a genuine friend and who is just using me, anyway. Although I'm getting better at that.


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15 Jul 2022, 9:02 am

HighLlama wrote:
Honestly, I don't really get why they even specify "needs support." I'm Level 1 and I've never had support in my life, when needed or not.
I'm also Level 1. Lived independently and married. Found out at age 64 I was on the Spectrum.

With the benefit of hindsight I can see I sometimes received subtle support which often resembled toleration.


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15 Jul 2022, 3:16 pm

Double Retired wrote:
HighLlama wrote:
Honestly, I don't really get why they even specify "needs support." I'm Level 1 and I've never had support in my life, when needed or not.
I'm also Level 1. Lived independently and married. Found out at age 64 I was on the Spectrum.

With the benefit of hindsight I can see I sometimes received subtle support which often resembled toleration.


I have definitely received extra help, similar to what you mention. And I'm grateful for it. I just meant formal supports.



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15 Jul 2022, 3:24 pm

HighLlama wrote:
skibum wrote:
The Autism severity rating is a tool to help providers figure out what support systems a person will need. That is its function.


They should have an Autism Level 0 - Needs Ignored category :P

Honestly, I don't really get why they even specify "needs support." I'm Level 1 and I've never had support in my life, when needed or not.


Yes - It's like systemic gaslighting: "Ha Ha! You need significant support but you can't have it!" Image

I'm listed as needing significant support but I think that means "In order to even try appearing like a normal person, you would need a lot of people as wingmen. If you aren't interested in acting like a normal person be independent and chart your own course, but you'll end up in burnout or breakdown. Then we can absolve ourselves of responsibility because we called it years ago. Have fun, and cheerio!"

To be fair I've had a lot of support from psych, OT, Speech Therapists, and ADHD doctors.

The problem is that none of it works, and I'm happier being myself than trying to change.



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15 Jul 2022, 4:08 pm

Quote:
2. Craig was diagnosed with autism at age 5. He had speech delays but started speaking at the age of 4. Due to his high intelligence he went to mainstream school at first but was bullied too much and also found being in a classroom of 30 children stressful, so he went to a special school from age 9 to 18. As an adult he lives alone in an apartment, and gets financial support from social services. He's had a part-time job before but due to his communication difficulties he couldn't stick at it, and he now receives disability benefit and doesn't have a job. But despite his communication difficulties he's still social and belongs to a Mencap group for adults with neurodevelopmental disabilities, and has a lot of friends that have downs syndrome or intellectual disability or autism, etc. Not all moderate individuals are the same as him but it still makes sense to call him moderate if you were to describe his functioning/severity.


im moderate functioning and im similar to this

i im a bus driver and driving is my passion and special interest
im good at dealing with the public too.i can be bossy and authoritive and not get affected by emotions of other people
i mask a lot but im not mild.
i have full on meltdowns even in public and i like being alone even though im not shy or anything i just have no interest in people except for my son and my husband because thats unconditional love and my father is dead and im not close to my mother at all and i dont like my sister much

i am disliked and misunderstood by people in general except for my husband and my son

i may not look autistic but i am


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Have diagnosis of autism.
Have a neurotypical son.


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15 Jul 2022, 6:58 pm

Caz72 wrote:
Quote:
2. Craig was diagnosed with autism at age 5. He had speech delays but started speaking at the age of 4. Due to his high intelligence he went to mainstream school at first but was bullied too much and also found being in a classroom of 30 children stressful, so he went to a special school from age 9 to 18. As an adult he lives alone in an apartment, and gets financial support from social services. He's had a part-time job before but due to his communication difficulties he couldn't stick at it, and he now receives disability benefit and doesn't have a job. But despite his communication difficulties he's still social and belongs to a Mencap group for adults with neurodevelopmental disabilities, and has a lot of friends that have downs syndrome or intellectual disability or autism, etc. Not all moderate individuals are the same as him but it still makes sense to call him moderate if you were to describe his functioning/severity.


im moderate functioning and im similar to this

i im a bus driver and driving is my passion and special interest
im good at dealing with the public too.i can be bossy and authoritive and not get affected by emotions of other people
i mask a lot but im not mild.
i have full on meltdowns even in public and i like being alone even though im not shy or anything i just have no interest in people except for my son and my husband because thats unconditional love and my father is dead and im not close to my mother at all and i dont like my sister much

i am disliked and misunderstood by people in general except for my husband and my son

i may not look autistic but i am


This sounds like my 2 aunts, one of whom ended up on disability and never worked (and her special interests are in sexist fields that didn't hire women at that time) and one of whom is now on disability for unrelated health issues. They both have speech and communication problems but seem to be able to mask for short periods of time. They can drive. They can live independently with some help, but require support with lots of tasks.

I suspect that this was my ex while we were together, too. (He was on meds that messed with his functioning, and seems to have gotten much better since his diagnosis and going off the meds.)

My mom is probably Level 1. She has worked, but got into personality issues with bosses, and has been a housewife for the past 25 or more years. She does not have meltdowns unless it's a major major crisis (during her cancer scare for example). She has had friends but tends to fall out with them. She spends most of her time researching her special interests (usually related to history) and writing.


I am probably Level 1. I am more hindered by executive function stuff (ADHD comorbid) than social stuff.


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15 Jul 2022, 7:08 pm

HighLlama wrote:
skibum wrote:
The Autism severity rating is a tool to help providers figure out what support systems a person will need. That is its function.


They should have an Autism Level 0 - Needs Ignored category :P

Honestly, I don't really get why they even specify "needs support." I'm Level 1 and I've never had support in my life, when needed or not.
I am a level three and I don't get any support. I have never had any in my life either.


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