MAGA’s give apparent ‘Heil Hitler’ salute at Trump rally

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DeathFlowerKing
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21 Sep 2022, 7:58 am

I agree with kraftie, plus even though white people have a long history of things they deserve to feel ashamed about it's not right to demonize all white people by lumping them together into one category. All white people are not the same just like all non-white people are not the same.



cyberdad
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21 Sep 2022, 8:07 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
We have to stamp out racism. But we also have to go beyond "race." Into a future where everybody is given a fair shake. Otherwise, as stated above, racism will continue to fester.


I agree but you need to teach students like the ones in thesw typical American classrooms why everyone in the class looks the same?. Here's an exercise
Google American classroom and see how many pictures look like this

Image

or this

Image

or this

Image

Notice the common theme in all these typical American classrooms



ASPartOfMe
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21 Sep 2022, 8:31 am

cyberdad wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
We have to stamp out racism. But we also have to go beyond "race." Into a future where everybody is given a fair shake. Otherwise, as stated above, racism will continue to fester.


I agree but you need to teach students like the ones in thesw typical American classrooms why everyone in the class looks the same?. Here's an exercise
Google American classroom and see how many pictures look like this

Image

or this

Image

or this

Image

Notice the common theme in all these typical American classrooms

Not exactly wring, not exactly right.
US schools remain highly segregated by race and class, analysis shows
Quote:
While US schools are growing more diverse, they remain highly segregated by race and class, according to a new analysis.

More than a third of students in the US attended racially segregated schools – schools in which more than three-quarters of students were accounted for by one race or ethnicity, according to an analysis of 2020-21 Common Core education data by the US Government Accountability Office. What’s more, more than one in 10 students – 14% – attended schools where 90% of students were of one race or ethnicity.

The report, released Thursday, comes just six years after the agency found a stark increase in the percentage of poor, Black and Latino students attending predominantly poor and minority schools over the course of a decade and a half.

While Black students accounted for 15% of the US public school population, 23% of them attended schools that were more than three-quarters Black. By comparison, 43% of white students, who now make up less than half of the US school population, attended predominantly white schools, nearly double that of Black students. For Latino students, who accounted for 28% of the US school population, 31% attended predominantly Latino schools.

The majority of schools in the midwest and north-east, which also had the highest percentage of schools that were predominantly a single race, were majority white. By comparison, schools in the west had more predominantly Latino students, while the south had more schools with largely Black and Latino students than other parts of the country.

US government officials highlighted two contributing factors.

While Black students accounted for 15% of the US public school population, 23% of them attended schools that were more than three-quarters Black. By comparison, 43% of white students, who now make up less than half of the US school population, attended predominantly white schools, nearly double that of Black students. For Latino students, who accounted for 28% of the US school population, 31% attended predominantly Latino schools.

The majority of schools in the midwest and north-east, which also had the highest percentage of schools that were predominantly a single race, were majority white. By comparison, schools in the west had more predominantly Latino students, while the south had more schools with largely Black and Latino students than other parts of the country.

US government officials highlighted two contributing factors to the continued segregation of America’s children: school district boundaries that determine who has access to what schools and the rise of school district secessions – the phenomenon of towns breaking away from larger school districts to establish their own school districts.

Frankenberg says that past supreme court cases have undermined efforts to desegregate school districts and the steps the federal government can take to integrate schools.

School funding also often relies on local property taxes and students often attend schools close to where they live, creating unequal access to resources when communities are segregated. What’s more, a separate landmark case in 2007 over Seattle’s desegregation efforts limited what voluntary integration efforts could be taken.

The GAO report found that between the 2009-10 and 2020-21 school years, more than 30 new districts broke off from previous school districts in seven states. Districts that broke from larger ones became wealthier and less racially diverse than the districts left behind, while the percentage of students on free or reduced lunch – a proxy for poverty – was sliced in half.


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kraftiekortie
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21 Sep 2022, 8:34 am

There are complex reasons why this is so.

It could be enforced segregation. It could be that nonwhite people are deliberately kept out of certain neighborhoods. It could be that "it just so happens that all the residents in this isolated village or town are white."

As for myself, my "special school" had very few black kids. When I went to public elementary school, there were very few black kids in my 6th grade class. My junior high in Queens was segregated by race, even though black kids were bused in. My junior high in Manhattan, though, was multicultural.

After 1971, after age 10, I went to summer camps which were multicultural. They were either YMCA camps, or Jewish camps. One camp was very religiously Jewish; the other Jewish camp was very secular. My mother didn't care that there were black and Hispanic kids in my camp, and that we shared bunks.

I have not lived in an exclusively white neighborhood since I moved out from my mother's house at age 20. At present, I live in a "minority white" neighborhood. Most of the residents are Hispanic, Indian, or East Asian.



DeathFlowerKing
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21 Sep 2022, 8:42 am

I live in Georgia and I've always went to mixed public schools and lived in mixed neighborhoods, of course the neighborhoods I lived in were always poor neighborhoods. There is a lot of racism in Georgia but strangely (at least where I live) segregation doesn't really seem to be that big an issue, except for when you're talking about the churches around here.



cyberdad
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21 Sep 2022, 7:10 pm

Socio-demographics determines where people choose to live. Middle class white/Asian people/white hispanic in North America proactively move to suburbs where their own kind predominate. They actively send their kids to schools that are less multicultural.

The issue is an open sore here in Australia. In the big cities everyone knows wealthy affluent suburb means three things
1. Expensive unaffortdable housing
2. 99% white/Asian population
3. Selective prestigious schools

I recall back in the late 1980s that new developments in the Melbourne suburb of Dandenong (one of our larger outer suburbs), white people started moving out in droves to avoid incoming refugee families and new migrants who took advantage of he cheaper housing prices. Today the only whites left in Dandenong are poorer communities of Greeks, Arabs and some eastern European migrants. Nobody with an Anglo-Celtic surname ventures into that geographic area.