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jimmy m
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23 Nov 2022, 8:33 am

These two conditions are the same. It is a brain flip. The dominant left side of the human brain (our daytime brain) becomes injured and goes off line. In a way we die. But the supporting brain that exist on the right side of the skull, which normally exist in our dream state (REM and NREM) springs to life and tries to keep us alive. These two brains are very different beings.

As a child of around age 3, I was struck by a large bull. It severely damaged by left side of my brain. As a result, I experienced what is described as a near death experience. I became an Aspie. Now, a couple years ago in my 70's, I suffered a massive stroke. In addition to severe aphasia damage, I also lost half of my vision on my right side. Normally this would be almost a life ending experience. But because I suffered a brain flip as a child, I was able to make significant recovery (not complete but significant).

These two conditions Asperger's Syndrome and Aphasia are the same.


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klanka
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23 Nov 2022, 3:37 pm

Quote:
Inability to comprehend language
Inability to pronounce, not due to muscle paralysis or weakness
Inability to speak spontaneously
Inability to form words
Inability to name objects (anomia)
Poor enunciation
Excessive creation and use of personal neologisms
Inability to repeat a phrase
Persistent repetition of one syllable, word, or phrase (stereotypies, recurrent/recurring utterances/speech automatism)
Paraphasia (substituting letters, syllables or words)
Agrammatism (inability to speak in a grammatically correct fashion)
Dysprosody (alterations in inflection, stress, and rhythm)
Incomplete sentences
Inability to read
Inability to write
Limited verbal output
Difficulty in naming
Speech disorder
Speaking gibberish
Inability to follow or understand simple requests

I dont have any of these symptoms though.

Someone else posted and said that brains of dead aspies were examined and found to be child-like in structure.



jimmy m
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04 Dec 2022, 12:01 pm

klanka wrote:
I dont have any of these symptoms though.

Someone else posted and said that brains of dead aspies were examined and found to be child-like in structure.


Many of the symptoms that you wrote describe what I experienced immediately after my stroke. I lost my ability to read (bur I retained my ability to write). Fortunately, I was able to regain that ability back after a few days. After my stroke, I looked at some writing and the words brake apart. Each of the letters fragmented into many pieces in front of my eyes and reassembled back into an entirely new alphabet system. One I could not read or interpret.

In addition, I lost my knowledge of all words. There were a few words left over but they were words I had learned from songs many years ago when I was young. It was extremely hard for me to say anything intelligently because I could not find the right words to say. So I substituted the few words that survived. So instead of saying one simple word, I had to use 10 or 20 words that were still inside my brain instead. It was so complex that most people could not understand what I was trying to say.

Luckily I was able to begin repairing the damage quickly. I was able to learn how to read again. I am at around the 8th grade level but my speed is still slow. It didn't impact my ability to write, only read. I wrote a short article to myself around three and a half weeks after my stroke. But I couldn't really read what I had written. I found the letter around a half year after my stroke and I was astonished by what I had written.

Now when I was around age 3 and suffered a near death experience, at that time I probably couldn't yet read or write. I was able to speak at around age 2 years and 3 months. But even at that age, I was only at the beginning of learning speech.

You wrote "
klanka wrote:
Someone else posted and said that brains of dead aspies were examined and found to be child-like in structure.


This makes a lot of sense. When I was struck by a large bull around the age of 3 and experienced a near death experience, the dominant left side of my brain died. The supporting brain on the right side of my skull came on line a short while later. It didn't know what happened. I had been brought to my bed in the house. I saw my dead body had been placed into my bed and my parents were looking at me in utter horror. I was not my body. I was right next to my body but I could see both my dead body and my parent. Then a voice came and said "Live or Die, Your Choice." I do not know where the voice came from. I never heard it speak to me before. I just couldn't allow my parents to feel such pain and hurt. So I said Live. But I came back as a very different person. I was utterly fearless.


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