Page 1 of 1 [ 8 posts ] 

AnnieK
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 6 Sep 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 91

05 Oct 2008, 2:38 am

Hi guys

Work is offering a training course in public speaking. I was wondering how important is public speaking for career advancement? Looking on the web I get a lot of sites saying it is important - OTOH a lot of those sites are also trying to sell you books/guides on public speaking!

Assuming it is important, what is an Aspie to do? I'm thinking public speaking might actually be easier for an Aspie than normal speech as you can practice beforehand...



bunny-in-the-moon
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 18 Sep 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 98
Location: UK

05 Oct 2008, 4:18 am

I love public speaking... but only when it's me talking about something I know a lot about.

I don't think it's impossible for aspies to be in the spotlight, albeit I'm aware for most it would be daunting. But for me, it's only awkward when I feel out of my depth, if I'm talking about something I know little about, because then I feel as thought my every word and move is under scrutiny.

When I'm discussing something I know a lot about, it's different, it's like I become possessed. Almost as if the shy, awkward and insecure side of me that can sometimes take hold completely disappears. I talk with my hands, eyes have a burning quality (allegedly) and most of all I get into a "zone" whether if someone tackles me on what I'm saying, I can be extremely quick and witty in my retort.

I think, like you say, because you could practice beforehand, you could become well acquainted with the material and that would work wonders for your confidence when actually speaking about it in front of others. There are only two other issues I'm guessing could pose a problem, with most aspies it does - the eye contact problem and also feeling awkward about where your hands are. As I say, if you manage to "talk with your hands", move them in sync with the points being put across, although not to the extent people are thinking you're having some sort of fit (too much flailing of the arms throws people, believe me :) ). Eye contact can be difficult I'll admit, but just don't focus on one person for too long, if you see how politicians speak to a crowd, they're not looking down at thier feet or up in the air, they're kind of "scanning" the crowd, looking from left to right and so on.

Hope I helped a little :? .



zeichner
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 10 Sep 2008
Age: 62
Gender: Male
Posts: 689
Location: Red Wing, MN

05 Oct 2008, 8:28 am

Whether or not you find it useful for your work, there are a number of reasons why you might find it to be a useful skill.

You will learn a number of techniques for organizing your thoughts to get the desired point across. You might also find this useful in formal social situations, like job interviews.

You will learn how to present yourself - where to put your hands, how to look out at the audience, how to stand, etc. You may find these to be good tips for everyday social interactions.

They might get into tips for how to modulate your voice - in public speaking, you are like an actor on the stage (similar to the way many people with AS feel with any social interaction.)

So yes, I think you should take advantage of the training.


_________________
"I am likely to miss the main event, if I stop to cry & complain again.
So I will keep a deliberate pace - Let the damn breeze dry my face."
- Fiona Apple - "Better Version of Me"


pineapple
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Apr 2006
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 573
Location: california

07 Oct 2008, 8:00 pm

I think its importance totally depends on your field.
I've done some public speaking, and I find it's easier than regular speaking, since you'll have a good idea of what you're saying beforehand, and in most cases the audience will have an interest in what you're saying.



886
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Jan 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,662
Location: SLC, Utah

07 Oct 2008, 9:59 pm

I find public speaking to be impossible. But that's just me.

Not offering much encouragement I suppose, but it can be really difficult for an aspie to overcome such a feat.


_________________
If Jesus died for my sins, then I should sin as much as possible, so he didn't die for nothing.


t0
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Age: 47
Gender: Male
Posts: 726
Location: The 4 Corners of the 4th Dimension

07 Oct 2008, 10:29 pm

I also find public speaking to be easier than casual conversation. I don't try to make jokes and just stick to the content. I think it just takes practice.



Bradleigh
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 May 2008
Age: 30
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 6,576
Location: Brisbane, Australia

08 Oct 2008, 3:01 am

I am pretty good at public speaking, but I have a tendency of not fully practiceing before hand, knowing the points and winging a lot of it, causeing a bit of stumbleing over words. I have learnt some good things that most people at my school didnt realy know, the trick especialy for beginers is to look at the of the room, like stareing at the bricks. Though with me I kind of have a sort of non shy me that takes over in such a situation, I do crack jokes, often getting some laughs but usualy it is the ones that come to me all of a sudden. I compared to other people I can look at others faces realy well, as I am not looking at my notes all of the tune, but sometimes I do leave my place and a few seconds of knowing you forgot what to say can feel like a minute, but I find public speaking fun.


_________________
Through dream I travel, at lantern's call
To consume the flames of a kingdom's fall


AnnieK
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 6 Sep 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 91

11 Oct 2008, 10:19 am

Thanks guys! I think I will do the course.